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    Heard this discussion on the radio and thought I'd bring it through to TSR.

    Agree, disagree, indifferent?

    I am of no opnion at this very moment.
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    Why do you say this?
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    (Original post by sil3nt_cha0s)
    Why do you say this?
    ?????
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    I think its more of the case the middle class favour the medical degree
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    Well I think its more complicated than its made out to be.

    There are a number of schemes run at medical schools up and down the country which offer students from underprivilaged backgrounds entry to medicine based on different criteria. I was very lucky to come of age just as these courses got going, although I like to think that eventually I would have gotten in lol.

    But yes, medicine is still very middle class, and I think that will remain for the forseeable future. There is more help for people from backgrounds like me than there has been before, but it doesn't change the fact that the idea of lots of debt and the lack of exposure to higher education can make medicine seem unobtainable.

    I think if you want it badly enough you can get there, even if it takes you on a bit of a roundabout journey to get there.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    I think its more of the case the middle class favour the medical degree
    Very possibly.

    I don't see why medical degrees should favour the middle class as such. Obviously there's the whole issue with some people living in a crap area and going to a crap school versus some people being able to afford to send their children to a private school or live in a good area with a better comprehensive etc etc, but presumably that's the same with most reasonably competitive degree courses.

    Wait, was the debate about middle-class children being more likely to get a place to study medicine at uni, or about middle class undergraduates doing better than working-class undergraduates once they were on the course? :confused:
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    (Original post by Meridian_Star)
    Very possibly.

    I don't see why medical degrees should favour the middle class as such. Obviously there's the whole issue with some people living in a crap area and going to a crap school versus some people being able to afford to send their children to a private school or live in a good area with a better comprehensive etc etc, but presumably that's the same with most reasonably competitive degree courses.

    Wait, was the debate about middle-class children being more likely to get a place to study medicine at uni, or about middle class undergraduates doing better than working-class undergraduates once they were on the course? :confused:
    The former.

    But more than that. The study said that individuals whose parents are from the highest earning groups were more likely to get into medicine, and that lower middle class as well as working class students were less likely to get in than before.
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    The application process surely favours richer people, not least because:

    1) Work experience is strongly preferred, if not essential;
    2) Those working in the medical profession, particularly those in positions to hire work experience students, are likely to be higher earners;
    3) It's surely easier to get work experience if you know the person who could give you a placement.
    4) Rich people tend to know rich people.
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    (Original post by Sarky)
    The former.

    But more than that. The study said that individuals whose parents are from the highest earning groups were more likely to get into medicine, and that lower middle class as well as working class students were less likely to get in than before.
    Did they give a reason, or were they just quoting statistics and getting people to discuss it?
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    I assume that this is based on Milburn's social mobility report which, while singling out medicine as an example, failed to note that medicine used to be more diverse and that Labour's education reforms have almost certainly done more to limit the career aspirations of the lower socioeconomic groups than any medical school.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    The application process surely favours richer people, not least because:

    1) Work experience is strongly preferred, if not essential;
    2) Those working in the medical profession, particularly those in positions to hire work experience students, are likely to be higher earners;
    3) It's surely easier to get work experience if you know the person who could give you a placement.
    4) Rich people tend to know rich people.
    Not necessarily - well obviously sometimes it is, but most people I know who have done medical work experience literally just wrote to hospitals or GP surgeries and asked. Most will take people, even if it's just for crappy jobs like filing and stuff..
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    (Original post by BJack)
    The application process surely favours richer people, not least because:

    1) Work experience is strongly preferred, if not essential;
    2) Those working in the medical profession, particularly those in positions to hire work experience students, are likely to be higher earners;
    3) It's surely easier to get work experience if you know the person who could give you a placement.
    4) Rich people tend to know rich people.
    Disagree. I wouldn't say that nurses, physios, carers or any other healthcare worker is as likely to be from a lower socio-economic class as an upper one.

    And 'hiring' work-ex students? :curious:
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    (Original post by Renal)
    I assume that this is based on Milburn's social mobility report which, while singling out medicine as an example, failed to note that medicine used to be more diverse and that Labour's education reforms have almost certainly done more to limit the career aspirations of the lower socioeconomic groups than any medical school.
    How so?
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    (Original post by Renal)
    Disagree. I wouldn't say that nurses, physios, carers or any other healthcare worker is as likely to be from a lower socio-economic class as an upper one.
    Not being a medical student (nor am I a prospective medical student, for that matter), my knowledge of getting work experience in the medical sector is purely anecdotal, but I would have thought that it was the more senior staff that chose whom to take on.

    And 'hiring' work-ex students? :curious:
    Taking them on, hiring them,... whatever you want to call it.
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    (Original post by Sakujo)
    How so?
    Closed grammar schools, removing scholarships, introducing tuition fees, uncapping tuition fees, doctor's pay cuts, doctor's accom cuts...

    http://www.hospitaldr.co.uk/blogs/bm...-up-profession
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    (Original post by BJack)
    Not being a medical student (nor am I a prospective medical student, for that matter), my knowledge of getting work experience in the medical sector is purely anecdotal, but I would have thought that it was the more senior staff that chose whom to take on.
    You thought wrong, it's more likely to be a human resources admin monkey. If clinical staff are involved a senior doctor has some swing, but so do senior nurses, senior PTs, senior OTs...



    Taking them on, hiring them,... whatever you want to call it.
    Sorry, I thought for a moment you were implying that they paid them.
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    (Original post by BJack)
    The application process surely favours richer people, not least because:

    1) Work experience is strongly preferred, if not essential;
    2) Those working in the medical profession, particularly those in positions to hire work experience students, are likely to be higher earners;
    3) It's surely easier to get work experience if you know the person who could give you a placement.
    4) Rich people tend to know rich people.
    i know numerous people on £30 a week EMA who've managed to get numerous work experience placements.
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    (Original post by Windsprite)
    Heard this discussion on the radio and thought I'd bring it through to TSR.

    Agree, disagree, indifferent?

    I am of no opnion at this very moment.
    Where on the radio?
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    (Original post by Renal)
    Closed grammar schools, removing scholarships, introducing tuition fees, uncapping tuition fees, doctor's pay cuts, doctor's accom cuts...

    http://www.hospitaldr.co.uk/blogs/bm...-up-profession

    I thought they were increasing pay? Not trying to be argumentative just curious.
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    (Original post by Tyrotoxism)
    i know numerous people on £30 a week EMA who've managed to get numerous work experience placements.
    And I know loads of people not on EMA who've managed to get plenty of experience. I didn't mean that it's impossible to get work experience unless daddy is a consultant; just that it's probably easier if he is.
 
 
 
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