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    I'm hoping to apply in September, grades permitting, for either engineering or physics. But unfortunately I cannot decide which to apply for and I'm quickly running out of time. I enjoy doing both maths and physics and would like engineering because of the opportunity to use both, but having said that I'm very interested particularly in the physics side of things and I think I would enjoy the course as much as engineering. But it worries me that there are a lot fewer jobs actually working in physics, especially since I don't want to go into finance, and the salaries aren't as high as for engineering.

    With regards to long term goals, I would ideally like a job that's not just office work. I also quite like the idea of moving to either Australia or America at some point after university. Can anyone give me any advice or pointers on this?

    I will be doing A-levels next year in physics, computing and further maths if that helps. Any help is very much appreciated.
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    (Original post by SuperNinja09)
    I'm hoping to apply in September, grades permitting, for either engineering or physics. But unfortunately I cannot decide which to apply for and I'm quickly running out of time. I enjoy doing both maths and physics and would like engineering because of the opportunity to use both, but having said that I'm very interested particularly in the physics side of things and I think I would enjoy the course as much as engineering. But it worries me that there are a lot fewer jobs actually working in physics, especially since I don't want to go into finance, and the salaries aren't as high as for engineering.

    With regards to long term goals, I would ideally like a job that's not just office work. I also quite like the idea of moving to either Australia or America at some point after university. Can anyone give me any advice or pointers on this?

    I will be doing A-levels next year in physics, computing and further maths if that helps. Any help is very much appreciated.
    If you enjoy the theoretical side go and do Physics. If you want to apply it engineering is the way forward. Physics is what should happen. Engineering is what actually happens.
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    I had this same problem as you! After going to a couple of open days (both physics and engineering), engineering sounds really, really, really boring.
    So i'm gonna apply for physics.
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    Do Engineering if you want to know what happens, do Physics if you want to know WHY something happens.

    MY Physics teacher equated it to this: Why would you use a bike machine when you can go biking on the moors?
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    (Original post by Zerodos)
    Physics is what should happen. Engineering is what actually happens.
    No, not really at all. Physics is what happens too. Engineering is about how to apply science to produce things (buildings, chemicals, etc) in an economic way.

    If you are unsure start with physics, you can always become and engineer with a physics degree anyway.
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    In terms of difficulity both in getting a good degrees and/or in being accepted into a good uni, how does physics and eng differ?

    Sorry for invading the thread.
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    (Original post by twig)
    In terms of difficulity both in getting a good degrees and/or in being accepted into a good uni, how does physics and eng differ?

    Sorry for invading the thread.
    I received an email a few months ago from an admissions tutor stating that right now, prospective physicists are in a "Buyers market," in that, due to the lack of competition, a merely competent applicant can get into a good university.
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    (Original post by calvinuk)
    I received an email a few months ago from an admissions tutor stating that right now, prospective physicists are in a "Buyers market," in that, due to the lack of competition, a merely competent applicant can get into a good university.
    Interesting.They can get in,but will they stay/last the course ? Something that worries me abit ,hehe.
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    I had the same problem, i had my heart set on physics but then realised I would prefer engineering (civil). The reason being is that I feel I would be more interested in how the science makes it happen, in particular to the environment.

    Also engineers are in demand and in my field I want to specialise in (civil), there will always be jobs out there.
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    (Original post by vortex64)
    I had the same problem, i had my heart set on physics but then realised I would prefer engineering (civil). The reason being is that I feel I would be more interested in how the science makes it happen, in particular to the environment.

    Also engineers are in demand and in my field I want to specialise in (civil), there will always be jobs out there.
    I was just about to start a thread on this too.

    Deep down I'd like to do Physics but I don't like the idea of spending 3 years studying a degree that will never be of much use to me except to say I have a degree in Physics.

    Engineering leads to a career much more easily doesn't it? Whereas most physics graduates end up in finance unless they go for a PhD and then do some kind of research?

    I don't think I really understand what the Engineering course entails, I've looked through loads of prospectus' and I just don't understand where the physics/maths side would fit in?

    Seems like a lot of talk about business skills, something I'm not too interested in.
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    (Original post by Josh-H)
    I was just about to start a thread on this too.

    Deep down I'd like to do Physics but I don't like the idea of spending 3 years studying a degree that will never be of much use to me except to say I have a degree in Physics.

    Engineering leads to a career much more easily doesn't it? Whereas most physics graduates end up in finance unless they go for a PhD and then do some kind of research?

    I don't think I really understand what the Engineering course entails, I've looked through loads of prospectus' and I just don't understand where the physics/maths side would fit in?

    Seems like a lot of talk about business skills, something I'm not too interested in.

    It's like any degree. It's not necessarily what career it guarantees at the end of it, it's about the transferable skills you aqquire.
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    (Original post by Josh-H)
    I was just about to start a thread on this too.

    Deep down I'd like to do Physics but I don't like the idea of spending 3 years studying a degree that will never be of much use to me except to say I have a degree in Physics.

    Engineering leads to a career much more easily doesn't it? Whereas most physics graduates end up in finance unless they go for a PhD and then do some kind of research?
    I know exactly what you mean. For me, physics seems more interesting but it would be easier to walk straight into a job with engineering. There are quite a lot of interesting jobs out there for physicists other than physics research, teaching or finance though. If you want to know what kind of jobs you can get, maybe try looking at the New Scientist jobs page online or something similiar.
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    (Original post by SuperNinja09)
    I'm hoping to apply in September, grades permitting, for either engineering or physics. But unfortunately I cannot decide which to apply for and I'm quickly running out of time. I enjoy doing both maths and physics and would like engineering because of the opportunity to use both, but having said that I'm very interested particularly in the physics side of things and I think I would enjoy the course as much as engineering. But it worries me that there are a lot fewer jobs actually working in physics, especially since I don't want to go into finance, and the salaries aren't as high as for engineering.

    With regards to long term goals, I would ideally like a job that's not just office work. I also quite like the idea of moving to either Australia or America at some point after university. Can anyone give me any advice or pointers on this?

    I will be doing A-levels next year in physics, computing and further maths if that helps. Any help is very much appreciated.
    If you have a natural flair and ability for Maths (especially the mechanics and pure side of it), you should consider Engineering. You should wait for your AS Level results and decide then. If you notice your mechanics modules, pure modules and mechanics Physics modules are very high marks, you clearly have the ability.

    Then you have to convince yourself that you enjoy it. Do you enjoy problem solving and the way mechanical models work? There are also many branches of engineering too, which need to be considered (eg. automotive, electronic). The subject is very much applied knowledge - are you able to quickly ascertain which methods of thinking are required for each problem?

    Physics is an evolving subject whereas Engineering is not quite like that. Physics will look at theories, present past and future, as well as some application, so if you have a creative, exploring mind that can deal with the appropriate quantitative nature of Physics, then go with that. Again, it's a question of what you enjoy and to an extent whether you enjoy science as a whole (eg. did you enjoy the atomic and bonding side of Chemistry?)
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    (Original post by Josh-H)

    I don't think I really understand what the Engineering course entails, I've looked through loads of prospectus' and I just don't understand where the physics/maths side would fit in?

    Seems like a lot of talk about business skills, something I'm not too interested in.
    Well I'm no expert on it, but it varies from various engineering disciplines. From what I can make out is that it is a very busy schedule, with lots of lectures, lab work, group work etc.

    I went to the Exeter open day and got a booklet on engineering which lists and explains each modules that are on offer, which is useful.
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    (Original post by sil3nt_cha0s)
    Physics is an evolving subject whereas Engineering is not quite like that. Physics will look at theories, present past and future, as well as some application, so if you have a creative, exploring mind that can deal with the appropriate quantitative nature of Physics, then go with that.
    This boundary blurs heavily, in both academic and industrial Engineering research. Some might say that Engineering is to Physics what Physics is to Mathematics, but I suspect both comparisons are unfair and untrue. Contributions occur in both directions and although you might be good at Physics, you may also make a phenomenal Engineer that can contribute to the body of knowledge in both.

    No doubt opinions will differ
 
 
 
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