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    *bump*
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    ???
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    Just keep contacting various engineering companies. I had a taster with TWI and Lotus which were both helpful.
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    thanks man
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    hmmmm
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    eh, i am applying for aeronautics at imperial, and engineering at Cambridge too. The thing is, its nice writing it down on the statement, and the committment may give a better impression to your UCAS referee. But for a relatively small advantage I am currently sitting in an office of a Contruction engneering company (Fluor Daniel) Given absolutely nothing to do (this is in Beijing), apart from access to the company net - with a few insightful articles, i feel so far it is a waste of time, as i am not even paid for this, just sitting around in the office from 8-6 for 2 weeks of my holidays.

    My pov is that it is only really valuable if you know you are gaining actual 'work experience', make sure to do your research beforehand at the tasks you will undertake and understand how you will squeeze it for all its worth and show what you have gained, otherwise dont do it, as i have gained nothing, except the ability to write it into the statement - I might as well have lied tbh.
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    that's a good perspective on it actually.
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    (Original post by thmadness)
    eh, i am applying for aeronautics at imperial, and engineering at Cambridge too. The thing is, its nice writing it down on the statement, and the committment may give a better impression to your UCAS referee. But for a relatively small advantage I am currently sitting in an office of a Contruction engneering company (Fluor Daniel) Given absolutely nothing to do (this is in Beijing), apart from access to the company net - with a few insightful articles, i feel so far it is a waste of time, as i am not even paid for this, just sitting around in the office from 8-6 for 2 weeks of my holidays.
    Erm, surely you can make an attempt to talk to the people there and get a better idea of how the industry works? Admittedly I've only done paid work experience (with exception of the stuff during secondary school) but my colleagues have always tried to make sure I know what's going on, even if it's stuff I can't really help with. The reason companies take on students for work experience, paid or not, is so they can do their bit in teaching the next bunch of students, so unless they're willing to talk to you so you get something out of it then it's a bit pointless.
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    thefish_uk: you got into cambridge for engineering; how was it for you? More details on what you did including work experiencing would be useful. thanks man
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    Communicating and knowing the industry is not a problem, with access to detailed articles on the network regarding projects in China, also being the aide of an aide helps as she has told me alot about the whole process and principles of the company. However while this is useful, I can't help but feel that you don't need actual work experience to do some research and talk to people. I get the feeling that i'm sitting around in the office not being useful for my time at all.

    If you want to know more about the industry, don't take the complicated route.
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    (Original post by Tony2DaMax)
    thefish_uk: you got into cambridge for engineering; how was it for you? More details on what you did including work experiencing would be useful. thanks man
    I can't actually find a copy of my personal statement so I'll have to remember! Work experience wise I had two weeks' year 10 work experience (engineering office) and EES. The year 10 thing was interesting as I had no idea I wanted to be an engineer until then (or about the professional side of engineering), and ended up in an office where they designed buildings and thought "this is cool!" I also mentioned a couple of books I'd read (numbers 5 and 6 from here) and briefly said what I'd learnt from them, plus I mentioned how I'd had a go at computer programming (nothing epic, just messing around). These were the subject-related extra-curricular things I had. Non-subject-related I talked about the school climbing club and a school international link group trip to Tanzania.
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    Thanks a lot thefish_uk! So even small things you do that show enthusiasm are good.
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    interesting replies so far
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    I partially take back what i said, it is indeed valuable - as yesterday was spent guiding the vice-chair and senior negotiator, both of which were from America around the pearl market in Beijing. I got to ask alot of questions regarding the contruction/recruitment/engineering process, saved them about 50% from haggling (they pick on foreigners here and ended up with all questions answered from the top dogs themselves along with a business card to keep 'in contact' if i have any more questions or have graduated and looking for employment.
    However i would say that is purely luck, and they only took interest because i am bilingual.

    Today, however i am back here doing jack all =)
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    hahaha nice one man
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    My successful Cambridge application included what could, at a push, be described as a day of "work experience". Just read the technology articles of New Scientist and be able to talk passionately about how they inspire you. This was basically the extent of my research and it allowed me to write a considered and thorough PS and perform well at uni interviews. However, if you are applying for YINI, a lack of (any) past work (experience) will, in my experience, cripple you. Remember that, even with minimal exposure to the industry, passion will shine through, where as in stark contrast the best placements in the world combined with only wanting to study the subject because it's a fast-track into finance will be blatant for all the wrong reasons.
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    YINI?

    I also feel like I'm at a disadvantage because I take the IB and work placements aren't a part of the curriculum like they are in A levels
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    YINI?
    Year in Industry. It's a gap year scheme, but, in my experience they're completely incompetent (don't let that put you off though).

    work placements aren't a part of the curriculum like they are in A levels
    There aren't work placements in A-Levels...
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Work_ex...United_Kingdom
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    buuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuump
 
 
 
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