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    Okay so this doesn’t really belong in here and it’s a double post - I know I should know better. But I need help and im guessing alot of the people on here that work as HCA are mostly likely med students or applying.
    Ive just accepted a job on the nurse bank as a HCA, training is in 4 weeks and last for 3 weeks. What can I expect at this training?

    I was told to prepare for the training but not what it would include :woo:



    thanks
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    3 weeks, wow that's extensive. I have been thrown straight into the deep end after one day induction.

    It's not going to be rocket science. If you can cope with a degree I am sure you can cope with some basic care skills training as well. Mendatory stuff that they must cover includes manual handling, health and safety and basic life support. I would imagine they will also show you how to do obs.

    Good luck.
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    (Original post by belis)
    3 weeks, wow that's extensive. I have been thrown straight into the deep end after one day induction.

    It's not going to be rocket science. If you can cope with a degree I am sure you can cope with some basic care skills training as well. Mendatory stuff that they must cover includes manual handling, health and safety and basic life support. I would imagine they will also show you how to do obs.

    Good luck.
    That what I was thinking thanks ill have a look into that thanks. I have 3 weeks 9-5 mon-fri training then a week of mentored shifts. Im not worried about it being hard its the fact she said recommended we prepare for it i dont want to be the only one not knowing what she talking about. Their 6 of us being trained together and im the only one that done Alevel so the theory shouldnt be to bad
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    I am also from the old school who had a training day, two super-numary shifts then thrown in.
    I don't understand what she means by 'the theory'? The theory of what? How to make a bed? How to wash a patient?? Balls.

    My first months were hard. Hard physically, I felt like a complete clutz a lot of the time, always knocking things over and petrified that I was going to hurt someone. And when it's all going ***s up some senior nurse will come along and sweep the patient into bed like magic, leaving you feeling half relieved and half embarassed. Then things begin to get easier, you meet helpful nurses who show you some tricks, and you work out a few things on your own. And then the job starts to get less interesting.
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    Mentored shifts are probably going to be the most usefull part of the whole experience. I had to learn loads as I went along and I would have loved to have somone with me at first to show me the ropes.

    If they expect you to do preparation it would be helpfull for them to let you know what's coming. She must be thinking that she has a bunch of mindreader is her class. :confused:

    I hope that they are paying you for all that time you will spend training.

    One important thing that I have forgotten: infection control. Learn all the official steps for handwashing and you will impress. :p:
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    (Original post by belis)
    If they expect you to do preparation it would be helpfull for them to let you know what's coming. She must be thinking that she has a bunch of mindreader is her class.

    I hope that they are paying you for all that time you will spend training.

    One important thing that I have forgotten: infection control. Learn all the official steps for handwashing and you will impress.
    Yeah we will be getting paid for the 3 weeks training. Arghhh I could probz repeat them all in my sleep thanks to microbiology last year. TBH she probz does think we can read minds. She litterally gave us all a CRB form and the start date of training then goes it would be advisable to prepare before the course starts.

    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    I am also from the old school who had a training day, two super-numary shifts then thrown in.
    I don't understand what she means by 'the theory'? The theory of what? How to make a bed? How to wash a patient?? Balls.
    It wouldnt surprise me, if i remember rightly the ward i used to volunteer on the HCA did, ECG, OBS, took bloods and some other tasks so i suspect that what will be covered.
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    (Original post by brokenangel)
    It wouldnt surprise me, if i remember rightly the ward i used to volunteer on the HCA did, ECG, OBS, took bloods and some other tasks so i suspect that what will be covered.
    Ah I see, you're not going to be a Grade A then - my line manager refused to give me any more training because they like me cheap, and HCAs who can do all those things get paid more than I do
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    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    Ah I see, you're not going to be a Grade A then - my line manager refused to give me any more training because they like me cheap, and HCAs who can do all those things get paid more than I do
    Oh I didnt realise that well the nurse bank ill be working for if i remember rightly has all bank staff qualified to do that sort of tasks. Im not 100% sure as i said she was very vague.
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    (Original post by brokenangel)
    Okay so this doesn’t really belong in here and it’s a double post - I know I should know better. But I need help and im guessing alot of the people on here that work as HCA are mostly likely med students or applying.
    Ive just accepted a job on the nurse bank as a HCA, training is in 4 weeks and last for 3 weeks. What can I expect at this training?

    I was told to prepare for the training but not what it would include :woo:



    thanks


    christ i had to get my glasses to read this!!

    Errr, well it'll be mostly on manual handling, taking observations, filling in the observation charts properly, doing dipping, meeting patients toileting needs, assisting in feeding and drinking, washing and personal care, ...even more manual handling..then the usual, fire safety, data protection, BLS- ie what to do in an emergency

    thats what a hca does and should know really, im sure ive missed something out and it DOES depend on where you go, for example on some wards hca's can't do obs and the RN's do etc, plus you can take packages and build on skills, usually after 3-6 months tho, these are things like taking ecg's, but its only if its needed really


    edit: oh and barrier nursing etc, what apron for what..what mop for what, who cleans what up

    Edit: i think the 'hcas' you're thinking of that took blood, cannulated etc were clinical support workers, not healthcare assistants, csw's are more with the medical team than the nursing team- but sometimes there is an overlap, depending where you are i guess
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    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    I am also from the old school who had a training day, two super-numary shifts then thrown in.
    I don't understand what she means by 'the theory'? The theory of what? How to make a bed? How to wash a patient?? Balls.


    Half of my first semester was doing this, and ive just finished an essay on the importance of personal care, mouth care in a patient..do not underestimate their importance!!! although thats whats nice about working as HCA i'm not having to consider the EBM behind everything you do

    My first months were hard. Hard physically, I felt like a complete clutz a lot of the time, always knocking things over and petrified that I was going to hurt someone. And when it's all going ***s up some senior nurse will come along and sweep the patient into bed like magic, leaving you feeling half relieved and half embarassed. Then things begin to get easier, you meet helpful nurses who show you some tricks, and you work out a few things on your own. And then the job starts to get less interesting.
    why's it embaressing a senior nurse can asisst in manual handling easier? its one of those things that just comes better with pratice really, the more you do it, the easier its gotten i find, i spend half the time moving patients than i did a year ago, because i dont have to stop and think what i need, or how to do something
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    Edit: i think the 'hcas' you're thinking of that took blood, cannulated etc were clinical support workers, not healthcare assistants, csw's are more with the medical team than the nursing team- but sometimes there is an overlap, depending where you are i guess
    Oh well ill just have to wait and see 3 weeks seems like a long time
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    I have applied for a bank HCA job as a school leaver. I applied to one previously but didn't get shortlisted to interview. I am still waiting to hear further from my current application.

    my question is did you have any trouble getting the HCA job?
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    (Original post by trektor)
    I have applied for a bank HCA job as a school leaver. I applied to one previously but didn't get shortlisted to interview. I am still waiting to hear further from my current application.

    my question is did you have any trouble getting the HCA job?

    if you have experience in a care setting, ie volunteering in a care home for a few months..or something then yeah its v.easy, it is a long application process though
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    (Original post by trektor)
    I have applied for a bank HCA job as a school leaver. I applied to one previously but didn't get shortlisted to interview. I am still waiting to hear further from my current application.

    my question is did you have any trouble getting the HCA job?

    if you have experience in a care setting, ie volunteering in a care home for a few months..or something then yeah its easy, it is a long application process though
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    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    I am also from the old school who had a training day, two super-numary shifts then thrown in.
    I don't understand what she means by 'the theory'? The theory of what? How to make a bed? How to wash a patient?? Balls.

    My first months were hard. Hard physically, I felt like a complete clutz a lot of the time, always knocking things over and petrified that I was going to hurt someone. And when it's all going ***s up some senior nurse will come along and sweep the patient into bed like magic, leaving you feeling half relieved and half embarassed. Then things begin to get easier, you meet helpful nurses who show you some tricks, and you work out a few things on your own. And then the job starts to get less interesting.
    this.
    well i dont know about the last bit havent gotten there yet
    i was originally supposed to have 2 shifts... i got 4 after some begging haha.
    3 weeks seems a bit overkill

    (Original post by trektor)
    I have applied for a bank HCA job as a school leaver. I applied to one previously but didn't get shortlisted to interview. I am still waiting to hear further from my current application.

    my question is did you have any trouble getting the HCA job?
    have you got any w/e dealing with people? little kids or smth perhaps?
    i got the first job i applied for. old people's homes, they always need workers.....
    if only med shcool interviews were easy as the interview for HCA haha
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    if you have experience in a care setting, ie volunteering in a care home for a few months..or something then yeah its easy, it is a long application process though
    I have been volunteering in a care home for almost a year now. Hopefully my current application will be more successful.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    why's it embaressing a senior nurse can asisst in manual handling easier?
    Because I am always embarassed when I can't do something for myself - personality flaw I'm afraid! But yes it does get easier with practice, and after three years I like to think I'm reasonably good now!

    Half of my first semester was doing this, and ive just finished an essay on the importance of personal care, mouth care in a patient..do not underestimate their importance!!! although thats whats nice about working as HCA i'm not having to consider the EBM behind everything you do
    I'm not saying balls because these are not important things, I'm saying balls because the test of whether you can do them or not appears to be writing an essay! *That* is balls, people should be taught practical skills, why does everything have to be a written exercise these days?
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    (Original post by LatinMachine)
    Because I am always embarassed when I can't do something for myself - personality flaw I'm afraid! But yes it does get easier with practice, and after three years I like to think I'm reasonably good now!

    I'm not saying balls because these are not important things, I'm saying balls because the test of whether you can do them or not appears to be writing an essay! *That* is balls, people should be taught practical skills, why does everything have to be a written exercise these days?

    well it was an excercise on looking at literature critiquing and EBM, its important as a nurse, as its part of the code of conduct to keep up best pratice and knowledge, if you do something where evidence has said its dangerous, or not efficent..not good! Plus personal care has a lot of stuff about infection control, dignity, consent..catheter care, mouth care when on oxygen, asessing pressure sores etc
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    (Original post by brokenangel)
    Okay so this doesn’t really belong in here and it’s a double post - I know I should know better. But I need help and im guessing alot of the people on here that work as HCA are mostly likely med students or applying.
    Ive just accepted a job on the nurse bank as a HCA, training is in 4 weeks and last for 3 weeks. What can I expect at this training?

    I was told to prepare for the training but not what it would include :woo:



    thanks
    I wouldn't know. I never did me ealthcare edumaction. Probs boring shizzle like manual handling, fire safety, infection control, food handling.

    Bank HCA = happy bank account
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    (Original post by No Future)
    Bank HCA = happy bank account
    Really I didnt think there would be many shifts going, where your at do you manage to get 8+hours per week. I really want to do 8hours as that ill nearly cover my uni rent meaning i can live in halls next year not at home
 
 
 
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