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Are the National broadsheets dominated by Oxbridge graduates? Watch

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    Do you think it would be difficult to get a job as a journalist/editor for newspapers such as the Times, Guardian (and perhaps the Telegraph and Independant) without an Oxbridge degree?

    It seems to me that a huge number of the writers working for these papers are Oxbridge graduates - is this a fair assessment? Why is this? Talent? Elitism? Making the right contacts at University?
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    Read the article in the Economist on this, if you have not already.
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    What does the article say, in short?
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    Surely the amount of drivel they publish would suggest not?

    (Take this as sarcasm or serious - whatever you want :rolleyes:)
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    (Original post by brightxburns)
    Do you think it would be difficult to get a job as a journalist/editor for newspapers such as the Times, Guardian (and perhaps the Telegraph and Independant) without an Oxbridge degree?

    It seems to me that a huge number of the writers working for these papers are Oxbridge graduates - is this a fair assessment? Why is this? Talent? Elitism? Making the right contacts at University?
    My dads an editor for the Telegraph and he didn't even go to university. Most of the really well known columnists and editors are Oxbridge grads, but I think the less well known journalists are not all from that background. Its a seriously difficult profession to get into though.
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    I think this is one of those industries where it matters more about WHO you know, rather than what you know. Therefore, as you rightly suggested, the contacts made at high-calibre universities are essential.

    But, this is not to say that non-Oxbridge students do not stand a chance - there is a still a market out there for quality journalists, and if this is not on broadsheets, then the internet welcomes journalists with open arms.
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    It has no obvious elitism like law and investment banking.

    If it is dominated by Oxbridge, will you give up trying? Just do your best. I imagine there is a lot of moment in newspaper journalism i.e. people work at a smaller paper and move onto national respected and quality newspapers.

    I recommend Season 5 of The Wire.
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    (Original post by AP123)
    It has no obvious elitism like law and investment banking.

    If it is dominated by Oxbridge, will you give up trying? Just do your best. I imagine there is a lot of moment in newspaper journalism i.e. people work at a smaller paper and move onto national respected and quality newspapers.

    I recommend Season 5 of The Wire.
    Completely unrelated - but I'm on the beginning of Season 2.
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    (Original post by dodgyant)
    Completely unrelated - but I'm on the beginning of Season 2.
    Probably my least favorite season but it's still very good.

    Enjoy, you're in for a real treat :yep:
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    I should bloody well hope so.
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    (Original post by brightxburns)
    Do you think it would be difficult to get a job as a journalist/editor for newspapers such as the Times, Guardian (and perhaps the Telegraph and Independant)
    Perhaps the Telegraph??
    Telegraph and Times are the real heavyweights. Guardian is rubbish.
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    (Original post by Fusion)
    Read the article in the Economist on this, if you have not already.
    Do you have a link to this article? I'd be interested in reading it.

    In answer to the O.P, yes. Journalism's notoriously elitist and un-meritocratic. The emphasis they place on work experience (particularly given that virtually none of the newspapers offer much in the way of formal internship) ensures that it's who you know and not what you know that matters. A friend of mine doing work experience at a magazine publishing company sent a speculative application to one of the magazines. The response she got was this 'We don't usually take on undergraduate interns but seeing as you went to Rugby...'
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    (Original post by miss_world)
    Do you have a link to this article? I'd be interested in reading it.
    '
    http://www.economist.com/world/brita...ry_id=14085782
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    Thank you
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    (Original post by AP123)
    Probably my least favorite season but it's still very good.

    Enjoy, you're in for a real treat :yep:
    Sorry to go on a tangent again but - loved the first season. I liked the realism and depth that the characters had. In fact, I'm a bit hesitant to watch second season as I don't want to be disappointed...
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    (Original post by dodgyant)
    Sorry to go on a tangent again but - loved the first season. I liked the realism and depth that the characters had. In fact, I'm a bit hesitant to watch second season as I don't want to be disappointed...
    Continue watching, it's truly the best show ever, I can guarantee that you won't be disappointed.
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    (Original post by brightxburns)
    Do you think it would be difficult to get a job as a journalist/editor for newspapers such as the Times, Guardian (and perhaps the Telegraph and Independant) without an Oxbridge degree?

    It seems to me that a huge number of the writers working for these papers are Oxbridge graduates - is this a fair assessment? Why is this? Talent? Elitism? Making the right contacts at University?
    Well, firstly you need to remember that the best writers and journalists were probably excellent writers in school too and therefore got into Oxbridge. So to have graduated from Oxbridge implies a high level of potential from an early age too.

    After that, I would probably say that they make a lot of the right sort of contacts at university and following that, they are taught well and allowed to develop their own particular style nicely; which all go into the formula for becoming a top journalist / editor.

    I would personally say that any element of elitism comes into play after all of this, it can't be too strong a factor today but it is idealistic to claim that it doesn't exist at all.

    Source: Relatives who have been journalists for much of their lives - though some advice may be outdated today.
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    hey guys i dont know how much these links will help but hopefully someone will benefit!....

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/informatio...322053,00.html

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/gree...hing-magazines
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    I dunno. Catherine Townsend writes for The Independent.
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    I don't know about Oxbridge graduates, but in my dealings with editors/subeditors the vast majority seem to be extremely rude if nothing else. If they did attend Oxford or Cambridge then they obviously didn't gain too many "people skills" while they were there. I have given up trying to break into freelance journalism with such papers, since I don't want to be treated the way I have been treated so far (I've had people ignore me, play mind games with me, patronise me, give me crappy lies for excuses, not call when they promised they would, and even put the phone down on me - I don't care how busy people are, as far as I'm concerned you shouldn't put the phone down on anyone).

    All of this when I have a fair amount of journalism experience and an Oxford degree (albeit at postgrad rather than undergraduate level). Frankly, after the experience I've had with the national broadsheets, I don't know whether to tell people to bother trying or not.
 
 
 
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