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    I've recently been doing some research into Irish history, and this question seems to arise frequently. I've noticed the theme of nationalism coming up fairly often, but I was wondering if there were any other reasons. What are your reasons for wanting an Ireland that is completely united?
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    So the map of Ireland looks nicer.
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    So that everyone can be involved in competitions that Walkers Crisps run I believe.
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    Because the original partition of the country was undemocratic, arbitrary and governed by baseless fear.
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    Only if southerners learn how to drive. :hmmm:
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    so i don't have to change currency when going to my nearest shop/petrol station....

    so businesses in Donegal don't get an unfair tax advantage over those in Derry....

    so i don't have to wait ages to get my Irish passport because its considered international mail so goes from Dublin-Bristol-Belfast-Derry....
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    I don't want a United Ireland and nor do most of the people of Northern Ireland, which for some reason Republicans don't seem to be able to grasp. I've even spoken to a good number of people who have said they don't care if the majority of the North is against union, they'd still want it despite their objections.

    The fact of the matter is, Ireland was never united until it was united under the English. So all this republican propaganda about a United Ireland and how the English have split a country in two is rubbish.
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    PAISLEY SAYS NO!!!

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    (Original post by ajp100688)
    I've even spoken to a good number of people who have said they don't care if the majority of the North is against union, they'd still want it despite their objections.
    Why do you think this is?
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    (Original post by ajp100688)
    I don't want a United Ireland and nor do most of the people of Northern Ireland, which for some reason Republicans don't seem to be able to grasp. I've even spoken to a good number of people who have said they don't care if the majority of the North is against union, they'd still want it despite their objections.
    what Republicans say is that whether or not the British should control part of Ireland should be decided by the people of Ireland, Ireland is 32 counties not just 6, if yoou take into account the whole of Ireland then you will find an overwhlming majority in favour of a united Ireland...
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    (Original post by WrongWayUp)
    Why do you think this is?
    Because Irish Republicanism has attained an almost religious like following, some people want it so much they are blinded to it's realities and don't even care if the population of the North want it or not. One of the people I know who supports a United Ireland is a pretty moderate person but hates the Good Friday agreement, he thinks it's a betrayal of the whole cause. Theres a reason Northern Ireland was created in the first place, so the whole United Ireland movement is based on a willing ignorance of the North's wants and needs.

    Irish Republicanism = fail.
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    (Original post by ajp100688)
    I don't want a United Ireland and nor do most of the people of Northern Ireland, which for some reason Republicans don't seem to be able to grasp. I've even spoken to a good number of people who have said they don't care if the majority of the North is against union, they'd still want it despite their objections.

    The fact of the matter is, Ireland was never united until it was united under the English. So all this republican propaganda about a United Ireland and how the English have split a country in two is rubbish.

    I have heard that the first part is true; and I've also heard that Northern Ireland is such a drain on resources that the Irish government actually has an interest in not unifying.

    However, the idea that Ireland was "never united until it was united under the English" would remain false even if it were changed to a more accurate "united AGAINST the English" - have you not heard of the Ard Ris, including my namesake?
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    (Original post by roryq)
    so i don't have to change currency when going to my nearest shop/petrol station....

    so businesses in Donegal don't get an unfair tax advantage over those in Derry....

    so i don't have to wait ages to get my Irish passport because its considered international mail so goes from Dublin-Bristol-Belfast-Derry....
    explain, im a bit lost, u live in N ireland or republic of Irealnd, ppl in N Ireland are entitled to an Irish passport or what?
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    So map makers dont have to use two colours when colouring the landmass of ireland just one. This in turn saves him/her raw materials directly benefiting the environment and economy. Basically if Ireland was reunited global warming and the current economic depression will become a thing of the past.
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    (Original post by niall c)
    I have heard that the first part is true; and I've also heard that Northern Ireland is such a drain on resources that the Irish government actually has an interest in not unifying.

    However, the idea that Ireland was "never united until it was united under the English" would remain false even if it were changed to a more accurate "united AGAINST the English" - have you not heard of the Ard Ris, including my namesake?
    The High Kings, I think? (my gaelige is a little rusty :P)

    I've heard of them, as far as my historical knowledge of them goes, they were pretty much on the whole just symbolic figures like the Holy Roman Emperors after the Peace of Westphalia. They were symbolically the premier kings but they only really held only power in their own territories while the rest of the lower kings continued their internecine squabbles and armed disputes.

    I wouldn't consider an Ireland fractured into numerous competitive and on often occasions fighting factions a unified Ireland, symbolic High King or not.

    And yes Northern Ireland makes less money than the UK puts into it, basically English taxes support it as it stands.
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    (Original post by ajp100688)
    Because Irish Republicanism has attained an almost religious like following, some people want it so much they are blinded to it's realities and don't even care if the population of the North want it or not. One of the people I know who supports a United Ireland is a pretty moderate person but hates the Good Friday agreement, he thinks it's a betrayal of the whole cause. Theres a reason Northern Ireland was created in the first place, so the whole United Ireland movement is based on a willing ignorance of the North's wants and needs.

    Irish Republicanism = fail.
    Utter ********. The country was split for purely selfish and undemocratic reasons. The Act of Partition should never have been allowed to happen, it went against the mandate of the British Government to uphold democracy, ie. majority rule and the majority of a whole Ireland in 1921 wanted a United Ireland under Irish rule. The Unionists only had a majority in Down and Antrim, which remains to this day as Derry, Fermanagh and Tyrone are generally Nationalist now as then.


    (Original post by niall c)
    I have heard that the first part is true; and I've also heard that Northern Ireland is such a drain on resources that the Irish government actually has an interest in not unifying.
    Northern Ireland in the past 5 or so years reached a level of economic output that it would have actually helped to boost the Irish economy .
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    (Original post by musti123)
    explain, im a bit lost, u live in N ireland or republic of Irealnd, ppl in N Ireland are entitled to an Irish passport or what?
    precisely mate, i live in Northern Ireland but under the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, the people of Northern Ireland were granted the right to Irish citiizenship and to hold an Irish passport....
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    I didn't realise I did want a united Ireland :lolwut:

    I don't know anywhere near enough about Ireland to say why though.
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    (Original post by roryq)
    precisely mate, i live in Northern Ireland but under the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, the people of Northern Ireland were granted the right to Irish citiizenship and to hold an Irish passport....
    We were granted that right in the Act of Partition, 1921, and the Irish Constitution. The Good Friday Agreement isn't that new an agreement. It just reiterates what's been said before: majority of nationalists in government, NI goes to the South, otherwise it stays.
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    (Original post by a_t)
    PAISLEY SAYS NO!!!

    I'd like to see a united Ireland for no other reason than to know Ian Paisley would die an extremely unhappy death.
 
 
 
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