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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    The situation is very different; the Portoguese have their own cultural identity and their own language. Until Partition, the province of Ulster had always been a definitive part of Ireland as a whole.
    Ulster also has the most die-hard republicans.
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    (Original post by indigoblue)
    Ulster also has the most die-hard republicans.
    ... who want a united Ireland, yes.
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    Portugal has never been part of Spain nor part of an Iberian kingdom, so the analogy fails.
    Wrong.
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    (Original post by AirRaven)
    Loyalist Marches? From London?

    Now how does that make any sense? The Love Ulster parade occurred in Dublin (or didn't actually occur in the end). The equivalent would be a Nationalist parade in the North- from Dublin. This hasn't happened.
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    (Original post by AirRaven)
    Wrong.
    What the ****? I replied to this and my reply's gone!

    As I tried stating before, read the entire article before you reference it. It even states that Portugal retained its status as a separate law zone and political and cultural entity. Unlike Northern Ireland, which blatantly was part of the Ireland and does not even have an historical reasoning behind which counties went where.
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    I wonder what justification was given for the boundaries of the initial partition of Ireland. It really does look like it was just a case of how big could they make Northern Ireland and still have a unionist majority. At the time did Northern Ireland have a large proportion of the population? I doubt that was the case.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    I wonder what justification was given for the boundaries of the initial partition of Ireland. It really does look like it was just a case of how big could they make Northern Ireland and still have a unionist majority. At the time did Northern Ireland have a large proportion of the population? I doubt that was the case.
    Down and Antrim had a Unionist majorty. Armagh was a small Unionist majority, and it has changed over the years. Tyrone, Fermanagh and Derry were all Nationalist strongholds, still are. They even asked to be allowed to stay with Ireland, but were refused. Ultimately, it was just to allow the unionists in Down and Antrim a viable enough area. The Irish felt that with Derry, Tyrone and Fermanagh, the Nationalists would have enough support after a few years, that the country would return, so they were willing to give them up. Obviously, due to the gerrymandering, that didn't happen and the Unionists still hold the smallest of majorities thanks to Down and Antrim being the most heavily populated counties.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    I wonder what justification was given for the boundaries of the initial partition of Ireland. It really does look like it was just a case of how big could they make Northern Ireland and still have a unionist majority. At the time did Northern Ireland have a large proportion of the population? I doubt that was the case.
    Well, Ulster Unionism had a distinct flavour long before partition, but yes the precise boundaries were more or less trying to satisfy as many of the people as they could in the short term. When Southern Ireland became the Irish Free State it was expected that the Border Commission would recommend major changes to where the boundaries lay - in the end, they opted simply to maintain more or less the status quo largely out of simplicity, I suppose. The report was never actually published.

    I suppose there was possibly also economic reasons: the presumption that a industrialised area on the east coast of Northern Ireland would require a larger agricultural area in order to have a mixed and self-sufficient economy.

    A very British tradition of cobbling things together and then thinking 'ah well, it seems to work fine' in all its glory.
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    Tyrone and the rest with the nationalist majority still got screwed over.
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    In my view as long as there are people loyal to the UK in NI it should stay British.

    To StarsAreFixed further above mentioning about certain Irish things in London and that it would never happen. Well have a good look around Kilburn/Harlesden/Shepherds Bush if you ever come to London. I am certain the hat still goes around the pub for the 'ra' in some of those places.

    London also is home to one of the biggest St Patrick's day parties in Europe after Dublin itself I believe. Ken Livingstone (the ****) chucked money at it when basically forgetting about St Georges day. The town hall of the town I live in even flew the tricolour for 3 days in 2005(even though people complained and it has not happened since).
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    The London Irish aren't exactly marching through the streets though, are they? A lot of them are alcoholics who were mistreated when they first came over anyway. Lots of cities have Paddy's Day parades, Londons is comparatively recent compared to New York etc. That's because Paddy's Day is clearly more fun
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    Its OK for Irish to immigrate to Britain, its OK for Britons to immigrate to IReland, (as long as they're not looking for governmental positions :p: )
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    we're both in the EU now. nationalism's sooo 20th century.
 
 
 
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