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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    Holyrood seriously isn't going to be a timeless iconic piece of architecture like more traditional parliament buildings. The same goes for the Welsh Assembly building. They're tasteless, non-functional buildings that go for abstract style over practicality.
    I've got to completely disagree with you about the Senedd in Wales.
    I visited it not that long ago and it's a really nice building with a lot of functionality. The Chamber itself is very nice and has a fantastic viewing gallery looking down on it; there are also a mass of conference and meeting rooms - all in full view of the public and all fitted with TV cameras.
    I actually loved it for its almost open plan layout. While it is a very 'different' building, it does retain a distinct traditional parliament building type feel with its modern but not OTT aesthetics.

    Also, despite it being dogged by cost overruns, it was still built for £67 million. That is a steal compared to the £414 million Scottish Parlimanent Building - which in my opinion is just a horrible piece of architecture.
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    (Original post by Meteorshower)
    Holyrood may look ugly and weird from the outside, but it seriously is a hell of a lot better on the inside. Not that that matters for this thread I suppose! My favourite is Westminster
    You Shetlanders have quite a nice 'parliament building' in Lerwick:



    :p:
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    (Original post by L i b)
    You Shetlanders have quite a nice 'parliament building' in Lerwick:



    :p:
    Oh the fun i've had in that building.. :p:
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    (Original post by Student2806)
    I've got to completely disagree with you about the Senedd in Wales.
    But compared to that other seat of government in Cardiff - Neuadd y Ddinas (City Hall) - it's a bit ... well, lame.

    .
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    Ok it was a bit expensive but I quite like it:

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    (Original post by Adorno)
    But compared to that other seat of government in Cardiff - Neuadd y Ddinas (City Hall) - it's a bit ... well, lame.

    .
    I certainly didn't expect you to be a traditionalist!

    Architecture has always been used politically. Whilst the Victorians (I assume) who built Cardiff City Hall sought to project history, grandeur and all that, the spirit behind devolution was quite different. It didn't ever take off in Scotland at least, but they were definitely looking for some sort of 'new politics' in the assemblies.

    I'm not saying that this sort of openness, friendliness and so forth cannot be incorporated in traditional materials and styles - it can be, and in the case of building in a historic area like Holyrood should be - but that is not to say the modern style has no value or doesn't succeed in its objectives. In that role, I think the Senedd succeeds.

    Look at it this way: if I ever visited Cardiff, I'd want to look round the Assembly rather than the City Hall from what I've seen. People often think of me as an arch-traditionalist in architectural terms, but I'm really quite open-minded. That doesn't mean I'll entertain **** though.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    I certainly didn't expect you to be a traditionalist!
    Not a traditionalist, no ... but I am a historian of that period so I sort of prefer those sorts of buildings. The Senedd, to me, is lovely and has an amazing glow about it when the sun is setting on the bay. But, at the same time, it's completely outdone by the simple majesty of the Norwegian Church.

    Architecture has always been used politically. Whilst the Victorians (I assume) who built Cardiff City Hall sought to project history, grandeur and all that, the spirit behind devolution was quite different. It didn't ever take off in Scotland at least, but they were definitely looking for some sort of 'new politics' in the assemblies.
    Ironically, it's not even that old. City Hall was built in the Edwardian period - Cardiff became a city in 1905 - and was opened in 1906. But it just has a magnificence that the Senedd lacks - to me at least. Also, part of the problem of the Assembly is that it lacks a sort of popular legitimacy in the area in which it exists, which is sort of why I think spending a (small) fortune on a building "down the bay" when a lot of investment had already been ploughed in down there didn't do them any favours. Utilising city hall would have been cheaper and made a statement which reflected anglicised Welsh tradition (which is what Cardiff represented after all - the "Coal Metropolis" ..) balanced with the signage of the new Welsh "government".
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    (Original post by necessarily benevolent)



    LMFAO
    Fair enough. Still is a nice building now. I also agree with the Canadian Parliament, really nice inside too, and another one that gets my vote is:

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    (Original post by Mad Vlad)
    I think the Hungarian parliament building is up there with the likes of the Palace of Westminster.
    Wow! That's really beautiful!

    One that hasn't been mentioned yet: The Swedish Rikstag

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    The parliament of Austria is quite nice, even if it does look like UCL:



    If I had to vote though, it'd be a toss up between Westminster, Ottawa or Budapest.
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    (Original post by CatatonicStupor)
    My vote goes to Parliament Hill in Ottawa:


    :eek: Okay, wow.


    I'd never seen/heard of this before... it wins, in my opinion.
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    (Original post by MazalTov89)
    One that hasn't been mentioned yet: The Swedish Rikstag
    The Chamber inside leaves a lot to be desired, but that is one absolutely excellent building - a great (and daring) blend between historic and modern, in a wonderful setting. I'm amazed I've never seen, or at least remembered, it before now.
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    Vienna city hall if we're including municipal parliaments as well as national parliaments...
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    Otherwise, a split between Westminster and Budapest
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    (Original post by Rosie0914)
    :eek: Okay, wow.


    I'd never seen/heard of this before... it wins, in my opinion.
    All the Canadian federal buildings are quite pretty. The Supreme Court is a bit dodgy, but, I suppose it's not exactly meant to look pretty, but imposing. Rideau Hall, the Governor of Canada's Ottawa home can seriously rival Chequers. But, it falls short of the Governor General's Quebec home in the Quebec citadel.

    It's a shame this is only about parliament buildings, because Canada could just own the show with it's 'high up' buildings.
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    what the hell man, theyre only borrin buildings, dont be bashing over architecture
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    Not sure if it's been mentioned but the Austrian one is pretty nice.

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    Why on earth do Canada need so many parliament buildings? Do they need one for every state?
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    (Original post by CatatonicStupor)
    All the Canadian federal buildings are quite pretty. The Supreme Court is a bit dodgy, but, I suppose it's not exactly meant to look pretty, but imposing. Rideau Hall, the Governor of Canada's Ottawa home can seriously rival Chequers. But, it falls short of the Governor General's Quebec home in the Quebec citadel.
    What Canada needs is a proper Royal Palace.

    (Original post by Rizzletastic)
    Why on earth do Canada need so many parliament buildings? Do they need one for every state?
    Yeah. Kinda the point of federalism, that.
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    (Original post by Rizzletastic)
    Why on earth do Canada need so many parliament buildings? Do they need one for every state?
    Every province in Canada makes it's own decisions on certain aspects of the lives of citizens in their province (couple of examples are the legal drinking age (18 in some provinces, and 19 in other) and tax levels).

    It's kinda similar to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland having their own governments, they dont have absolute power, but can make key decisions that would affect the local are.
 
 
 
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