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    Does physics lead easily into a job in the environment/weather/geographical stuff/fuel?
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    Well, there is the field of geophysics. Physicists are employed in the areas of environmental modelling, combustion and meterology so I'd say it certainly is possible. I work in the energy sector and we hve physicists working in several areas you have mentioned within my company.
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    Oh I see. What about things like predicting earthquakes, and studying mountains for eruptions etc.?
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    I'd say physics is one of those degrees that can get you into a whole lot of things. It's a very good degree, you can even get employed by banks with it :eek:
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    (Original post by n0c0ntr0l)
    I'd say physics is one of those degrees that can get you into a whole lot of things. It's a very good degree, you can even get employed by banks with it :eek:
    I didn't think that was such a leap :p:

    I'm not an expert in this but I would have thought a physicist (with a good level of computer skills) would be able to go into these types of fields. They are multidisciplinary areas and so require people from several different specialities.
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    (Original post by BrightGirl)
    Oh I see. What about things like predicting earthquakes, and studying mountains for eruptions etc.?
    Yes it is certainly possible, you'd have to do a Masters or PhD in Geophysics though

    (Original post by n0c0ntr0l)
    I'd say physics is one of those degrees that can get you into a whole lot of things. It's a very good degree, you can even get employed by banks with it :eek:
    Shocking! Like a 3rd of physics students probably end up in some sort of finance...

    But also, you can get employed by banks with practically any degree (i'm not saying it's easy, you need to have a good degree, but the subject isn't so important)
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    Do Engineering.
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    Definitely weather. To become a WMO certified forecaster you need a science or met degree and a physics degree is very highly rated by the major weather research and forecasting groups in the UK and abroad.
    Worked for me anyway
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    (Original post by BrightGirl)
    Oh I see. What about things like predicting earthquakes, and studying mountains for eruptions etc.?
    Earth hazard monitoring and the like is more geoscience related, but with a physics degree you do have a chance of working in that field. I would imagine you would be expected to have at least an MSc in geophysics (which isn't very common in the UK at all) but then again, I don't have much experience so I'm not sure :p:
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    (Original post by MC REN)
    Yes it is certainly possible, you'd have to do a Masters or PhD in Geophysics though



    Shocking! Like a 3rd of physics students probably end up in some sort of finance...

    But also, you can get employed by banks with practically any degree (i'm not saying it's easy, you need to have a good degree, but the subject isn't so important)

    Geography, History, Maths, Physics and Economics being the main ones though for front office jobs
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    (Original post by MC REN)
    Yes it is certainly possible, you'd have to do a Masters or PhD in Geophysics though
    (Original post by trm90)
    Earth hazard monitoring and the like is more geoscience related, but with a physics degree you do have a chance of working in that field. I would imagine you would be expected to have at least an MSc in geophysics (which isn't very common in the UK at all) but then again, I don't have much experience so I'm not sure :p:
    What is Geophysics, is it a proper degree or just something you do after your degree? How come it's not common?
    You know a Masters, if you do an Msc in Physics, would you then need to do an extra masters in Geophysics? :confused:
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    (Original post by BrightGirl)
    What is Geophysics, is it a proper degree or just something you do after your degree? How come it's not common?
    You know a Masters, if you do an Msc in Physics, would you then need to do an extra masters in Geophysics? :confused:
    There are over half a dozen undergraduate geophysics programmes around the country, but there are very few Masters courses in them (most of them being focused on structural geology or applied methods etc).

    You could try and do a geophysics related project in a physics masters, but a geophysics masters would provide you with more specific knowledge better suited to volcano monitoring/earthquake monitoring.
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    (Original post by BrightGirl)
    What is Geophysics, is it a proper degree or just something you do after your degree? How come it's not common?
    You know a Masters, if you do an Msc in Physics, would you then need to do an extra masters in Geophysics? :confused:
    Geophysics is just an area of Physics, including seismology and mantle convection and tectonics and stuff - most Physics courses will have some options (by the time you get to 4th year probably) relating to geophysics.

    If you do an Msc in Phys then you would be able to do a PhD in Geophysics and research it without doing a specialised masters (the masters would be if you only did BSc) or you could go straight into work for some company (like Schlumberger or BP or something) which looks into that sort of stuff - but again, for the sort of work you sound like you'd be interested in, you would probably want a PhD
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    (Original post by trm90)
    There are over half a dozen undergraduate geophysics programmes around the country, but there are very few Masters courses in them (most of them being focused on structural geology or applied methods etc).

    You could try and do a geophysics related project in a physics masters, but a geophysics masters would provide you with more specific knowledge better suited to volcano monitoring/earthquake monitoring.
    Oh wait so I would have to not do the physics degree altogether and apply for a Geophysics one instead. Aw mannnn, i'd have to redo my UCAS all over again.
    And I suppose if I had a change of heart and wanted to do research in physics or something, it would be harder to get into that after a Geophysics degree...
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    (Original post by MC REN)
    Geophysics is just an area of Physics, including seismology and mantle convection and tectonics and stuff - most Physics courses will have some options (by the time you get to 4th year probably) relating to geophysics.

    If you do an Msc in Phys then you would be able to do a PhD in Geophysics and research it without doing a specialised masters (the masters would be if you only did BSc) or you could go straight into work for some company (like Schlumberger or BP or something) which looks into that sort of stuff - but again, for the sort of work you sound like you'd be interested in, you would probably want a PhD
    Oh...how long does a PhD usually take? So would you recommend doing a physics degree over a geophysics one? I am still not sure what I want to do really...regarding future jobs.
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    My degree is Physics and maths, which in honors will get me into computer software engineering.
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    (Original post by BrightGirl)
    Oh...how long does a PhD usually take? So would you recommend doing a physics degree over a geophysics one? I am still not sure what I want to do really...regarding future jobs.
    PhD is usually 3-4 years, but it isn't really anything like doing an undergraduate degree - you get paid to do real research, you're not sitting exams, etc

    I'd recommend doing a physics degree - the met office requirements are pretty broad:

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/corporat...recasting.html

    And if you aren't really sure then doing a broader undergraduate degree is probably sensible.
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    (Original post by BrightGirl)
    Does physics lead easily into a job in the environment/weather/geographical stuff/fuel?
    It can do. Your best bet is to look at the websites of the kind of company you want to work for and have a look at their careers section and see what sorts of graduates they recruit.
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    (Original post by MC REN)
    PhD is usually 3-4 years, but it isn't really anything like doing an undergraduate degree - you get paid to do real research, you're not sitting exams, etc

    I'd recommend doing a physics degree - the met office requirements are pretty broad:

    http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/corporat...recasting.html

    And if you aren't really sure then doing a broader undergraduate degree is probably sensible.
    Thanks so much, I think i'll stick with the physics degree then.
    Repped.
    Thanks everyone else as well!
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    (Original post by ToastyCoke)
    My degree is Physics and maths, which in honors will get me into computer software engineering.
    I'm sorry to hear that
 
 
 
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