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    (Original post by K the Failure)
    They're all just as **** as each other.
    Tut tut. Don't swear

    The OP wants some free online IQ tests, not stupidly accurate ones which, in reality, take 2 hours to complete.
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    haha, got 135
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    Thanks for the replies, this has become quite an interesting thread to read.

    And I've never taken IQ tests seriously, but I've always wanted a numerical figure to tell me how 'intelligent' I am - even if just for the comical aspect, especially if it is ridiculously low or high! :p:

    (Original post by Simplicity)
    But in History you will need to know who say Goring is and what was his plan as if they ask you about Nazi germany then your pretty screwed if you don't know what he did.
    As a current maths and history pupil I can see where you're both coming from (you and Vicious Fishes) and you're both valid in your own arguments. Here, however, I would like to point out that very few history exam questions are ever that specific for the reason that they want to test your ability to analyse and reason a crafted argument rather than recall reams of information. In papers where questions do get that specific, there are always options for example, "complete two questions out of the following eight". This is something you would never see in a maths paper, at school level anyway.

    (Original post by Simplicity)
    However, the small details that get you the marks really need memory. Plus, if you can remeber stuff about Goring for example then it makes it easier to argue that German economy was geared towards war before WW2.
    True - I would not doubt that one bit. However, it is similarly true that remembering the small details of how to correctly carry out a certain mathematical operation, or how best to write a proof, are essential to making a maths paper easier than if you did not have the memory to remember this information.

    At the end of the day, the ability to remember is important to all types of exams which one sits at the end of a course of study, as opposed to aptitude tests. You can argue that certain subjects lean further in the favour of those who have good memories than others, but we'll all consider different levels of achievement (such as to get a D by simply recalling information in history is possible, but not getting a A by the same method) and our own subjective impressions... so such an argument will only go round in circles! :woo: :yes: :p:
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    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    In papers where questions do get that specific, there are always options for example, "complete two questions out of the following eight". This is something you would never see in a maths paper, at school level anyway.
    What history exam are you doing? I did History at A level. Pretty much choose one out of two questions. Actually, in STEP you can choose which question you do but then thats STEP. Anyway, I don't see how you can reason that its not memory because you have choice of which question you anwser. Certainly, if it wasen't memory they would force people to do a certain question as the details of the question would be unimportant as its not based on memory. The only reasons they would have options is if you knew more on one topic, hence memory.

    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    True - I would not doubt that one bit. However, it is similarly true that remembering the small details of how to correctly carry out a certain mathematical operation, or how best to write a proof, are essential to making a maths paper easier than if you did not have the memory to remember this information.
    Firstly, there is no proofs at alevel just show. Lastly, thats C1 and C2. Thats like saying if you can't spell then you can't write which is correct. Anyway, Further maths goes beyound that. Plus your forgetting method marks, they allow mistakes and if you did make a mistake then you either don't understand it or can't check. Both not dependent on memory more crappy reasoning.

    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    At the end of the day, the ability to remember is important to all types of exams which one sits at the end of a course of study, as opposed to aptitude tests. You can argue that certain subjects lean further in the favour of those who have good memories than others, but we'll all consider different levels of achievement (such as to get a D by simply recalling information in history is possible, but not getting a A by the same method) and our own subjective impressions... so such an argument will only go round in circles!
    Actually, neuroscience will help. The part that does maths in your brain is at the side and if you look at the brain whilst somebody is doing maths its clear its not based on memory. I'm pretty sure you can't say that about history because you will have to constantly access facts i.e. like what Goring did in WW2. I disagree I'm pretty sure if you can remeber all the arguments and what to debate then its easy to get an A in history.

    Maths is more spotting pattarns and being able to reason deductively. Which, is sort of the opposite of memory.
 
 
 
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