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    (Original post by GormlessWonder)
    No, 'Gelder and Kitchen' in Hull. I suppose being a smaller firm up North would have made it easier as well.

    Anyway, keep trying to get work experience in the holidays, I'll still be trying to at uni probs.
    Tbh I don't know what gives you a better chance out of big and small firms. Most of the the big companies didn't respond at all while most of the small companies did but had no positions, even temporary, to offer because there simply isn't any room.

    Oh I will :p: One small company said that they MAY have something available in the Spring, so I'll enquire again then What uni are you going to?
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    (Original post by pippa90)
    Tbh I don't know what gives you a better chance out of big and small firms. Most of the the big companies didn't respond at all while most of the small companies did but had no positions, even temporary, to offer because there simply isn't any room.

    Oh I will :p: One small company said that they MAY have something available in the Spring, so I'll enquire again then What uni are you going to?
    Westminster, maybe see you down in London.
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    (Original post by GormlessWonder)
    Westminster, maybe see you down in London.
    Cool, yeah maybe
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    Architecture is definately not worth it. Perhaps it is worth it to do part 1, but part 2 is soul destroying and frankly not worth it.

    If we are to enter a discussion about worth, we must first establish a means to measure 'worth'. If you're measure is financial, it is categorically not worth it. If you're measure is pleasure, creativity, joy, social life, general well being and happiness, it also categorically not worth it.

    In fact, I struggle to find any method of measuring the worth architecture, if it is for you're own satisfaction or some sugar coated ideology for some kind of personal achievement, then it is also not worth it? Why? Because the outcome, pass, fail, drop out, succeed, whatever it may be, is often in the hands of tutors, who are part of a political system, who's opinions are entirely without fact. Ie. there is no clear criteria in which a project can be judged. The opinions of the tutors in question, (the people who decide your fate; their decision is usually a finger in a wind; ahhh this projects an A , that's a B.. why? what is your criteria? they'll feed you some inevitable BS about context, resolution, organisations, conceptual dexerity, intellectual ambition, refinement... what are these 'criteria' they are ambigious to say the least. So much down to following the party line (a house style of a school) both on the tutor's part and on the student's part and also down to the 'mood' of the tutor and the 'mood of the student' and the 'favourites' in the year; it's all frankly, a outrageously pathetic method of judging and measuring the projects, which have taken so much blood and tears to produce.


    Therefore, if we take another example of personal achievement, perhaps a marathon, or climbing everest, or perhaps sailing around the world; there is a clear means in w hich to measure the performance of your venture. Consequently, your future and you're efforts and entirely in the realms of chance. In a nutshell; architecutre is a gamble; a game of roulette, black or red, pass or fail. It really doesn't matter.

    Why are you doing it ? Why should anyone care? Truth be told; the general public, the other students, the 'world out there' to which architects have little or no connection too because of their isolation, and inevitable solitude doesn't care, it never did and it never will.
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    worth it or not, its a perspective. nobody is gonna answer that for you.
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    Architecture is worth MINUS £30K in my bank balance after 3 years of part 1.
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    (Original post by yeahyeahyeahs)
    Architecture is worth MINUS £30K in my bank balance after 3 years of part 1.
    did you get that job you interviewed for?
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    (Original post by jrhartley)
    did you get that job you interviewed for?
    No, I didnt go for the interview. I don't have time to have a part time job in an office and university at the same time.
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    (Original post by ArchiBoi)
    Architecture is definately not worth it. Perhaps it is worth it to do part 1, but part 2 is soul destroying and frankly not worth it.

    If we are to enter a discussion about worth, we must first establish a means to measure 'worth'. If you're measure is financial, it is categorically not worth it. If you're measure is pleasure, creativity, joy, social life, general well being and happiness, it also categorically not worth it.

    In fact, I struggle to find any method of measuring the worth architecture, if it is for you're own satisfaction or some sugar coated ideology for some kind of personal achievement, then it is also not worth it? Why? Because the outcome, pass, fail, drop out, succeed, whatever it may be, is often in the hands of tutors, who are part of a political system, who's opinions are entirely without fact. Ie. there is no clear criteria in which a project can be judged. The opinions of the tutors in question, (the people who decide your fate; their decision is usually a finger in a wind; ahhh this projects an A , that's a B.. why? what is your criteria? they'll feed you some inevitable BS about context, resolution, organisations, conceptual dexerity, intellectual ambition, refinement... what are these 'criteria' they are ambigious to say the least. So much down to following the party line (a house style of a school) both on the tutor's part and on the student's part and also down to the 'mood' of the tutor and the 'mood of the student' and the 'favourites' in the year; it's all frankly, a outrageously pathetic method of judging and measuring the projects, which have taken so much blood and tears to produce.


    Therefore, if we take another example of personal achievement, perhaps a marathon, or climbing everest, or perhaps sailing around the world; there is a clear means in w hich to measure the performance of your venture. Consequently, your future and you're efforts and entirely in the realms of chance. In a nutshell; architecutre is a gamble; a game of roulette, black or red, pass or fail. It really doesn't matter.

    Why are you doing it ? Why should anyone care? Truth be told; the general public, the other students, the 'world out there' to which architects have little or no connection too because of their isolation, and inevitable solitude doesn't care, it never did and it never will.
    Why are you all so miserable? Why are you going through this? Why not quitting, finding a different place in life and.... be happy... or be unhappy there as well then change and be unhappy there as well then change and be unhappy there as well until you realise it isn't them, it is you!

    Please stop torturing yourself, change your course, do something else... be happy...

    please....
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    (Original post by archi_b)
    Why not quitting
    Probably involves masochism.
    Most of the architects here do seem to detest the course passionately, rather than just be made miserable by it, seems to be a kind of sick desperate hopelessness that they get off on. :awesome:
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    (Original post by ArchiBoi)
    Architecture is definitely not worth it. Perhaps it is worth it to do part 1, but part 2 is soul destroying and frankly not worth it.

    If we are to enter a discussion about worth, we must first establish a means to measure 'worth'. If you're measure is financial, it is categorically not worth it. If you're measure is pleasure, creativity, joy, social life, general well being and happiness, it also categorically not worth it.

    In fact, I struggle to find any method of measuring the worth architecture, if it is for you're own satisfaction or some sugar coated ideology for some kind of personal achievement, then it is also not worth it? Why? Because the outcome, pass, fail, drop out, succeed, whatever it may be, is often in the hands of tutors, who are part of a political system, who's opinions are entirely without fact. Ie. there is no clear criteria in which a project can be judged. The opinions of the tutors in question, (the people who decide your fate; their decision is usually a finger in a wind; ahhh this projects an A , that's a B.. why? what is your criteria? they'll feed you some inevitable BS about context, resolution, organisations, conceptual dexerity, intellectual ambition, refinement... what are these 'criteria' they are ambigious to say the least. So much down to following the party line (a house style of a school) both on the tutor's part and on the student's part and also down to the 'mood' of the tutor and the 'mood of the student' and the 'favourites' in the year; it's all frankly, a outrageously pathetic method of judging and measuring the projects, which have taken so much blood and tears to produce.


    Therefore, if we take another example of personal achievement, perhaps a marathon, or climbing everest, or perhaps sailing around the world; there is a clear means in w hich to measure the performance of your venture. Consequently, your future and you're efforts and entirely in the realms of chance. In a nutshell; architecutre is a gamble; a game of roulette, black or red, pass or fail. It really doesn't matter.

    Why are you doing it ? Why should anyone care? Truth be told; the general public, the other students, the 'world out there' to which architects have little or no connection too because of their isolation, and inevitable solitude doesn't care, it never did and it never will.
    This is the same for a lot of creative subjects.
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    (Original post by GormlessWonder)
    Probably involves masochism.
    Most of the architects here do seem to detest the course passionately, rather than just be made miserable by it, seems to be a kind of sick desperate hopelessness that they get off on. :awesome:
    If you're not joking, that's a very ignorant and naive view.
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    (Original post by pippa90)
    This is the same for a lot of creative subjects.
    True. But the difference between architecture and other creative disciplines is that architecture is supposed to be a professional qualification (read: training to become an architect). This is where the problem lies.
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    (Original post by Ex Death)
    If you're not joking, that's a very ignorant and naive view.
    Joking mostly. But from what I've read here, you do need to be the kind of person who thrives on this kind of punishing required work ethic.
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    (Original post by Ex Death)
    True. But the difference between architecture and other creative disciplines is that architecture is supposed to be a professional qualification (read: training to become an architect). This is where the problem lies.
    Why is that a problem?
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    (Original post by pippa90)
    Why is that a problem?
    I think the point that's being made is, for example, if you are a ceramicist or a painter, you can throw a pot or make a painting and people can obviously differ in their opinion of it as a piece of art.

    Architecture is treated and taught in the UK as almost an art as well. This is what I have been banging on about for ages - what Valerio Olgiati correctly identifies as 'the genius dellusion'. Olgiati maintains (and I totally agree with him) that architecture is far closer to a science than a creative art. There are far too many 'rules' that you can't just pay no attention to that as you can in the pure arts.

    Consequently, arbitrary "I like it" / "I don't like it" comments are somewhat less fair. You see a lot of schemes that tutors swoon over that would be totally unbuildable for various reasons (structure, regs, cost, etc). The point I think that is being made is the assessment of work frequently remains far too much in the art department, far too infrequently in the reality department.

    If you contrast that with, say the way architecture is taught at ETH Zurich, you start to understand the difference. Have a look at their work:

    http://www.arch.ethz.ch/darch/vorste...ch.php?lang=en
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    (Original post by jrhartley)
    I think the point that's being made is, for example, if you are a ceramicist or a painter, you can throw a pot or make a painting and people can obviously differ in their opinion of it as a piece of art.

    Architecture is treated and taught in the UK as almost an art as well. This is what I have been banging on about for ages - what Valerio Olgiati correctly identifies as 'the genius dellusion'. Olgiati maintains (and I totally agree with him) that architecture is far closer to a science than a creative art. There are far too many 'rules' that you can't just pay no attention to that as you can in the pure arts.

    Consequently, arbitrary "I like it" / "I don't like it" comments are somewhat less fair. You see a lot of schemes that tutors swoon over that would be totally unbuildable for various reasons (structure, regs, cost, etc). The point I think that is being made is the assessment of work frequently remains far too much in the art department, far too infrequently in the reality department.

    If you contrast that with, say the way architecture is taught at ETH Zurich, you start to understand the difference. Have a look at their work:

    http://www.arch.ethz.ch/darch/vorste...ch.php?lang=en
    Ah yes I get what you mean :p: I've just finished an art and design foundation course, focusing in interior design and the tutors knew jack all about it, and just focused on the colour use and how well my work was presented. I spent God knows how long doing loads of ergonomical workings out, like shelf heights, space between rails, size of fitting rooms etc. (I was re-designing a shop) and all they did was look at it, say okay, then moan that the colours were too 'out of the bottle' and that the people walking around in the shop's clothing didn't match the interior colours! :mad: It pissed me the hell off! lol

    I agree that Architecture should be classed as more scientific, but then tbh I wouldn't want all architects to be building standard, boring looking buildings that look the same as all the rest. There have to be at least a few amazing artistic architects who can create awesome looking buildings while still making them possible to build
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    In school architecture is art in practice architecture is a business.

    Every year you see lots of presidents medals entries that just simply couldn't be built and either the students don't have a clue how they could maybe possibly be built or they choose to leave it out of their 12 slides because their tutors know the judges don't care.
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    Thats the one thing that annoys me about Architecture as a subject. I have recently graduated and there was a group who were the tutors favourite that all funnily enough came off with firsts. Within my school of architecture there was blatant favourites and everyone else knew it. On of said favourites whos final project to quote a tutor was "Boring" still came off with a first. Why? Because of who she is!

    Whether it doing it as a career is worth it depends on you as an individual. Personally I dont care what the tutors say about my work so long as they dont try and screw me and give me a tutu. However give it afew years and I may change my opinion! To do it as a profession you have to love it. If your just doing it as a job your in the wrong profession.
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    (Original post by ArchiBoi)
    In fact, I struggle to find any method of measuring the worth architecture, if it is for you're own satisfaction or some sugar coated ideology for some kind of personal achievement, then it is also not worth it? Why? Because the outcome, pass, fail, drop out, succeed, whatever it may be, is often in the hands of tutors, who are part of a political system, who's opinions are entirely without fact. Ie. there is no clear criteria in which a project can be judged. The opinions of the tutors in question, (the people who decide your fate; their decision is usually a finger in a wind; ahhh this projects an A , that's a B.. why? what is your criteria? they'll feed you some inevitable BS about context, resolution, organisations, conceptual dexerity, intellectual ambition, refinement... what are these 'criteria' they are ambigious to say the least. So much down to following the party line (a house style of a school) both on the tutor's part and on the student's part and also down to the 'mood' of the tutor and the 'mood of the student' and the 'favourites' in the year; it's all frankly, a outrageously pathetic method of judging and measuring the projects, which have taken so much blood and tears to produce.



    Why are you doing it ? Why should anyone care? Truth be told; the general public, the other students, the 'world out there' to which architects have little or no connection too because of their isolation, and inevitable solitude doesn't care, it never did and it never will.
    Very well said.
 
 
 
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