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    I have heard of students taking Biomedical sciences as a degree then doing a postgraduate degree in medicine. Are there any advantages/disadvantages of doing this that anyone can think of? As I am tempted to do this option since I have had no relevant work experience. (Because I thought I was going to do veterinary medicine till recently so got W.E for that instead )
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    - More competitive
    - More expensive
    - More time consuming
    + Get there in the end
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    All are disadvantages, theres nothing advantageous about it
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    it buys you more time to decide if medicine is deffo the route you wanna take...thats why im doing it anyway...
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    I dont think their is many advantages, maybe you get more life experience, also I have heard graduates make better doctors! But I suppose the disadvantages outweigh the advantages!

    Only go down this route if you get less than AAB at A level!
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    (Original post by shaz111)
    I dont think their is many advantages, maybe you get more life experience, also I have heard graduates make better doctors! But I suppose the disadvantages outweigh the advantages!
    dont
    Only go down this route if you get less than AAB at A level!
    What if you get AAA, just don't have the average medicine applicant GCSE grades.

    And you could always get rejected even with AAA, I sometimes wonder is it worth taking a gap year and reapplying or going to do a Bsc and try for GEP's.
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    Personally I prefer Biochemistry or Medicinal Chemistry to Graduate Medicine but either way you get there in the end. I just find Biochemistry/Medicinal Chemistry to be more interesting xD
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    Surely this route will give you the advantage of NHS funding for 3 years of your course instead of one (should you go on a graduate course), then you will get good education in your first degree which might help.

    And it must be good to do a degree first, otherwise american universities wouldn't insist on them.

    It's only an extra 2 years to get the initial medicine degree.
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    (Original post by FinalFlash)
    What if you get AAA, just don't have the average medicine applicant GCSE grades.

    And you could always get rejected even with AAA, I sometimes wonder is it worth taking a gap year and reapplying or going to do a Bsc and try for GEP's.
    If you are predicted AAA many places are prepared to overlook "bad" grades at gcse. My gcse grades were 5A*2A3BC which, for a medical applicant, is towards the lower end of a spectrum. From what my interviewers told me and the admission staff is poke to at various universities, gcses are rarely a deal breaker. If you have them, great, if not you will have to work a little harder to show you are right for them.

    I can't comment with authority on any of this, much less the GEP program, but 3 years delay is proably more than you are thinking it is, and lack of motivation could be a serious problem, not to mention competitiveness cost etc etc
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    (Original post by FinalFlash)
    What if you get AAA, just don't have the average medicine applicant GCSE grades.
    Depends what you mean by poor GCSE's, I guess if you get below 5 C's you could say GEP would be advisable, but even then I dont think med schools disadvantage students that resat their GCSE's, so I would recommend that you do a good few GCSE resits, and then reapply!

    Graduate medicine is abit like Law conversion courses, or Investment banking positions they are all hyper competitive because everyone wants to do them!
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    As a graduate post-biomedical student I can tell you that the GEP entry programme is pretty much useless because of the competition.. never .. contemplate it if you have the option to take a gap year and reapply for medicine. 3 years of extra study is no joke for something you didnt want to do and most certainly will exhaust you by the end of it.
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    (Original post by PJ991)
    Surely this route will give you the advantage of NHS funding for 3 years of your course instead of one (should you go on a graduate course), then you will get good education in your first degree which might help.

    And it must be good to do a degree first, otherwise american universities wouldn't insist on them.

    It's only an extra 2 years to get the initial medicine degree.
    There's a lot of factual inaccuracy and misconceptions here i think. Start by explaining the last line and we can go from there.
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    There's a lot of factual inaccuracy and misconceptions here i think. Start by explaining the last line and we can go from there.
    I think he meant:

    Standard entry = 5 years
    GEP entry = 3 + 4 years (assuming a successful 1st application) = 7 years total = 2 years "extra".
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I think he meant:

    Standard entry = 5 years
    GEP entry = 3 + 4 years (assuming a successful 1st application) = 7 years total = 2 years "extra".
    oh i see
    thanks
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    There's a lot of factual inaccuracy and misconceptions here i think. Start by explaining the last line and we can go from there.
    I'll go through it all shall I?

    NHS offer bursaries and loans for medicine courses. For a standard 5 year degree at undergraduate, NHS pay the fees for the 5th year, and they offer loans for bursaries for living.

    For a 4 year graduate course, the NHS will pay fees for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th year, and also offer loans and bursaries.

    In America, for a medicine degree, you must also hold an undergraduate degree.

    It will take an extra 2 years because the standard Biomedical Science degree will usually be 3 years, and a graduate medicine course will be 4. Which means it takes 7 years to get both degrees, compared to 5 on a straight up medicine course.
    ~(Obviously you not a proper doctor then)
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    (Original post by shaz111)
    Depends what you mean by poor GCSE's, I guess if you get below 5 C's you could say GEP would be advisable, but even then I dont think med schools disadvantage students that resat their GCSE's, so I would recommend that you do a good few GCSE resits, and then reapply!

    Graduate medicine is abit like Law conversion courses, or Investment banking positions they are all hyper competitive because everyone wants to do them!
    I have an averages of B's and C's, but if i do get predcted 3 A's and do well in my ukcats (which is in a weeks time) i feel that even with my extra curricular and work exp stuff...I'm going to end up going the Loung route because of my Gcse's.

    Anyways time will tell.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    - More competitive
    - More expensive
    - More time consuming
    + Get there in the end
    Debatable don't you think? I'd worry about embarking on a degree like biomed with the sole aim of doing medicine afterwards - it wouldn't be too hard to end up as an embittered lab monkey ten years down the line.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    Debatable don't you think? I'd worry about embarking on a degree like biomed with the sole aim of doing medicine afterwards - it wouldn't be too hard to end up as an embittered lab monkey ten years down the line.
    I guess that depends on how capable you are of patching up the weaknesses in your application before you end up soul destroyed.
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    (Original post by PJ991)
    I'll go through it all shall I?

    NHS offer bursaries and loans for medicine courses. For a standard 5 year degree at undergraduate, NHS pay the fees for the 5th year, and they offer loans for bursaries for living.

    For a 4 year graduate course, the NHS will pay fees for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th year, and also offer loans and bursaries.

    In America, for a medicine degree, you must also hold an undergraduate degree.

    It will take an extra 2 years because the standard Biomedical Science degree will usually be 3 years, and a graduate medicine course will be 4. Which means it takes 7 years to get both degrees, compared to 5 on a straight up medicine course.
    ~(Obviously you not a proper doctor then)
    Obviously I not.
    I am indeed a student.
    I only have 2 problems with what you say. Medicine via GEP is more expensive than via undergraduate course. Doesn't matter whose funding what, by the time you are an earning junior, the GEP Dr. is in more debt.

    As for the, if the Americans do it it must be a good idea or necessary.
    Really?
    Sure it's nothing to do with the astronomical college fees US institutions charge, and the pharma companies who fund the vast budgets of said institutions requiring Doctors to be in large amounts of debt in order to 'monetarily persuade' them to prescribe certain drugs?
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    (Original post by James92)
    I have heard of students taking Biomedical sciences as a degree then doing a postgraduate degree in medicine.
    It's still an undergraduate degree in medicine ... even if you are a graduate.

    (Original post by FinalFlash)
    I sometimes wonder is it worth taking a gap year and reapplying or going to do a Bsc and try for GEP's.
    What exactly do you find confusing about it?

    The gap year route is less expensive and is generally less time consuming. Then getting in at the end is generally a less competitive process.
 
 
 
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