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    (Original post by FinalFlash)
    I have an averages of B's and C's, but if i do get predcted 3 A's and do well in my ukcats (which is in a weeks time) i feel that even with my extra curricular and work exp stuff...I'm going to end up going the Loung route because of my Gcse's.

    Anyways time will tell.
    Chill out about WE and extra curricular stuff. I didn't start WE until late september and only managed 4 hours before my interview. I just thought in advance about "what i had learned about medicine and my suitability to it". I never set foot in a hospital or even spoke to a Doctor. Whether that will come back to bite me we will see but hey, I have a place at Medical School.
    I wasn't epecting to be asked about Extra curricula stuff at all, so when i was i just blurted out "I'm writing a novel" and that was that.

    It's not what you do, It's what you say.
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    (Original post by PJ991)
    ~(Obviously you not a proper doctor then)
    And who exactly are you again?
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    Obviously I not.
    I am indeed a student.
    I only have 2 problems with what you say. Medicine via GEP is more expensive than via undergraduate course. Doesn't matter whose funding what, by the time you are an earning junior, the GEP Dr. is in more debt.

    As for the, if the Americans do it it must be a good idea or necessary.
    Really?
    Sure it's nothing to do with the astronomical college fees US institutions charge, and the pharma companies who fund the vast budgets of said institutions requiring Doctors to be in large amounts of debt in order to 'monetarily persuade' them to prescribe certain drugs?
    I wasn't referring to you (sidewalkwhenshewalks) being a doctor, I was referring to the hypothetical person who has just finished their medicine degree. I used this instead of "one is not a doctor" because I'm not that formal.

    I also apoligise for typing you instead of you're, merely a typo.

    Lets not get into why you (one) already need(s) a degree in America. I just pointed it out.
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    (Original post by Renal)
    And who exactly are you again?
    As I have posted above, I wasn't referring to the person who I replied to.
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    (Original post by PJ991)
    As I have posted above, I wasn't referring to the person who I replied to.
    Still, who are you? Practising doctor? Senior med student? What's your interest here?
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    (Original post by PJ991)
    I wasn't referring to you (sidewalkwhenshewalks) being a doctor, I was referring to the hypothetical person who has just finished their medicine degree. I used this instead of "one is not a doctor" because I'm not that formal.

    I also apoligise for typing you instead of you're, merely a typo.

    Lets not get into why you (one) already need(s) a degree in America. I just pointed it out.
    Sorry for being cruel over the typo.
    You did say in your first post that if the Americans did it it must be a good idea, which is a fallacy and a dangerous one at that.
    Also your "not a proper Dr" comment brings into question what you originally meant with the 2 year comment, because i dont think it was what GSG and I thought. How are you not a proper doctor after completing your medical degree? What is the initial medical degree?

    The way I see it this is a very tangled mess and one that can only be sorted with drastic measures. I suggest you either
    Restate your original post, edited for clarity, so any misconceptions can be remedied, and i can better understand your views

    or

    you retract your original statement i.e. delete it using the edit feature

    thank you
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    Sorry for being cruel over the typo.
    You did say in your first post that if the Americans did it it must be a good idea, which is a fallacy and a dangerous one at that.
    Also your "not a proper Dr" comment brings into question what you originally meant with the 2 year comment, because i dont think it was what GSG and I thought. How are you not a proper doctor after completing your medical degree? What is the initial medical degree?

    The way I see it this is a very tangled mess and one that can only be sorted with drastic measures. I suggest you either
    Restate your original post, edited for clarity, so any misconceptions can be remedied, and i can better understand your views

    or

    you retract your original statement i.e. delete it using the edit feature

    thank you
    In terms of not being a proper doctor, I mean that, after the degree, you can't just leave and be a fully qualified doctor, you need to do more training in your chosen field.
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    (Original post by PJ991)
    In terms of not being a proper doctor, I mean that, after the degree, you can't just leave and be a fully qualified doctor, you need to do more training in your chosen field.
    I see.
    Thanks for clearing it up i thought you were drawing a distinction between undergrads and GEP being somehow proper/improper
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    (Original post by Renal)
    Still, who are you? Practising doctor? Senior med student? What's your interest here?
    I am none of the above. I have spent time looking into this though, and referred to websites like this, regarding the funding between the 2 courses: http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/details...lt.aspx?Id=557

    I based the point of it being an extra 2 years by knowing that an accelerated graduate medicine course is 4 years + the undergraduate 3 year degree.

    And fair enough, my point about the USA is dodgy to say the least, but I've typed it now, so people know I've said it, and accept my mistake.

    It doesn't take a doctor/trainee doctor/medicine applicant etc. to look into these things.
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    (Original post by PJ991)
    I am none of the above. I have spent time looking into this though, and referred to websites like this, regarding the funding between the 2 courses: http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/details...lt.aspx?Id=557

    I based the point of it being an extra 2 years by knowing that an accelerated graduate medicine course is 4 years + the undergraduate 3 year degree.

    And fair enough, my point about the USA is dodgy to say the least, but I've typed it now, so people know I've said it, and accept my mistake.

    It doesn't take a doctor/trainee doctor/medicine applicant etc. to look into these things.
    Not to have the mechanical ability, but the motivation, certainly it helps.
    Just a bit of leisure time reading was it?
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    Not to have the mechanical ability, but the motivation, certainly it helps.
    Just a bit of leisure time reading was it?
    No it wasn't.
    I was considering doing a Physiology or Pharmacology or Biology and Immunology degree, and while looking into what you can do with them afterwards, I read into graduate medicine.
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    (Original post by PJ991)
    No it wasn't.
    I was considering doing a Physiology or Pharmacology or Biology and Immunology degree, and while looking into what you can do with them afterwards, I read into graduate medicine.
    And what are you doing?
    I'm just being nosey now
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    And what are you doing?
    I'm just being nosey now
    Well I'm not doing any degree, just doing UCAS now, but I'm going to apply for 4 universities for Italian.

    Then my 5th will be one of the sciences I mentioned at Newcastle.
    (Personal statement is unimportant for this because I get a guaranteed offer anyway)
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    Disadvantages: When you do a biomed degree, purely to get into medicine and you find that you've been unsuccessful. That's horrible.

    Even if you feel you have to go down graduate route, think very carefully about the degree you do and the employment opportunities should you decide not to medicine or medical schools decide they don't want you.

    And just to throw in somethimg I've mentioned before, one of my biomed course buddies originally got 3 offers for medicine but got AAC and subsequently got rejected from medicine. He did biomed, got a thrid and is now screwed. LOL just think things through.
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    1. The GEP route is FAR more competitive, and there is absolutely no guarentee you will get a med school place after you graduate.

    2. The GEP route is FAR more expensive, even with the NHS funding. The average student will accrue around £27,000 of debt from the Biomedical Science degree, then a further ~£25k from the GEP Medicine degree. That's ~£52k altogether, as opposed to ~£42K for your average school leaver med student. (These are very rough figures based on 3K rent a year, 3K living costs per year and 3K tuition fees).

    3. When you get onto the GEP programme, the workload is incredibly intense, particularly in the first year where you have to learn what would be spread across the first 2 years of the normal degree, which is difficult in its own right.

    4. You spend 3 years doing something you aren't interested in, and trust me when i tell you this; a biomedical science degree is COMPLETELY different to a medicine degree. You will be doing a lot of tedious lab practicals and learning about methods of measuring biochemical substances etc. Ultimately you are being trained for a job which requires far less mental application than doctoring.
    On my biomed degree, modules covered were:
    1st year - health and disease, anatomy and physiology, cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology and research methods
    2nd year - microbiology, analytical chemistry, histology, statistics and pharmacology
    3rd year - microbiology, clinical chemistry, haematology, cell pathology, genetics, immunology and your dissertation

    All of these (with a couple of exceptions) were geared towards lab work, and were often tedious.

    5. Getting a 2:1 in a Biomedical science degree is still extremely tough, as the poster aboves example shows. It is certainly one of the more difficult degrees to do well in.


    Those are 5 good reasons to avoid the graduate route. I was lucky to get 3 offers after my degree but that is very much the exception. I would strongly advise against the GEP route unless absolutely necessary.
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    (Original post by hoonosewot)
    I was lucky to get 3 offers after my degree but that is very much the exception. I would strongly advise against the GEP route unless absolutely necessary.
    Out of interest, did you do your first degree at Newcastle? If yes, did you apply to transfer to medicine at the end of stage 1?
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    (Original post by PJ991)
    Out of interest, did you do your first degree at Newcastle? If yes, did you apply to transfer to medicine at the end of stage 1?
    Nope, i wasn't even aware you could transfer at Newcastle!

    Good point to bring up though, as that's another highly inadvisable option many people go for, going onto a biomed course and then trying to transfer. The amount of people who do that successfully is minute compared to the amount that attempt it.
 
 
 
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