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How are diesel cars better than just normal petrol cars? Watch

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    (Original post by HJV)
    Most of them have a turbo, though. A blown turbo is easily £1000+ in repairs.

    My God.

    And petrol cars don't have turbos?


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    (Original post by DirtyHarry)
    But in the same regard the petrol engines aren't as tough because they don't need to cope with such pressure in the first place.

    And surely it depends entirely on how the car has been driven.
    Dealing with internal forces means its less susceptible to external forces aswell.
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    (Original post by HJV)
    Well that just basically means your dad's car has double insulation around the engine space while your crappy car has hardly any insulation. On the whole, with everything else the same, diesels tend to be louder.
    not to mention more cylinders and a better exhaust system.
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    (Original post by Friggerpants)
    Are you being serious?

    More complex?


    Is there an ignition circuit with plugs that could go wrong? No
    Do they rev over 4500ish RPM? No
    Do you have to worry about AFR? No.

    Do you even have to worry about Cetane rating or quality of fuel? Generally, no.


    The most complex thing that could go wrong is Cambelts and turbos, which surpsrisngly go on petrol counterparts.

    Fuel pumps can be expensive, but it's easy to change if you know how.


    Another benefit is that diesel ECU's love parameters being changed, thus making it easy to map them.
    What does the rev-limit have to do with it? Honda engines seem to manage fine revving until the end of time.

    And most 'normal' petrol cars don't have turbos to go wrong in the first place whereas all diesel engines do now.
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    (Original post by Friggerpants)
    My God.

    And petrol cars don't have turbos?


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    Where on earth did you see me say that? Relatively, there's a lot more naturally aspirated petrols than diesels. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by DirtyHarry)
    What does the rev-limit have to do with it? Honda engines seem to manage fine revving until the end of time.

    And most 'normal' petrol cars don't have turbos to go wrong in the first place whereas all diesel engines do now.
    The fact it revolves a lot less, means less wear. It's basic engineering.


    What do you mean by turbo go? It's not a common fault, and actually you're more likely to blow a turbo on a petrol due to compressor surge, a problem a Diesel won't have due to the lack of throttle body.
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    (Original post by HJV)
    Where on earth did you see me say that? Relatively, there's a lot more naturally aspirated petrols than diesels. :rolleyes:
    Whatever, the fact is turbo's go on both fuels, so why should that matter?
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    (Original post by Friggerpants)
    The fact it revolves a lot less, means less wear. It's basic engineering.


    What do you mean by turbo go? It's not a common fault, and actually you're more likely to blow a turbo on a petrol due to compressor surge, a problem a Diesel won't have due to the lack of throttle body.
    As I said, Honda engines seem ok being able to rev to near enough twice that.

    That's fine and all but as has been said there are far more naturally aspirated petrol cars than there are with forced induction, certainly when considering mass-market cars where diesels mainly are.
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    **** diesel. petrol is smoother, nicer to drive, more entertaining, and fuel consumption isnt that much of an issue with new petrol cars. You have to drive diesel cars 'harder' to get the same out of them as 'normal' driving would with a petrol of the same power/torque etc.

    did anyone see the fifth gear test recently where two of the same car, one 1.2 petrol, one 1.4? diesel did the same route, and the petrol came out with a better mpg?

    plus diesel fumes smell nasty and petrol doesnt
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    (Original post by MR.PINK)
    for the same VOLUME: diesel have more energy than petrol
    so to move the same distance, in the same car with the same engine size, you would need less volume of fuel if using diesel.

    eventhough diesel is slightly more expensive than petrol pet liter, in the long run its cheaper because u need less of it to travel the same distance.

    hope that helps

    p.s. rep [+vely] if u agree
    Diesel is the same price or 2p cheaper p/l than Petrol now!!
    :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by WilliamWJ)
    **** diesel. petrol is smoother, nicer to drive, more entertaining, and fuel consumption isnt that much of an issue with new petrol cars. You have to drive diesel cars 'harder' to get the same out of them as 'normal' driving would with a petrol of the same power/torque etc.

    did anyone see the fifth gear test recently where two of the same car, one 1.2 petrol, one 1.4? diesel did the same route, and the petrol came out with a better mpg?

    plus diesel fumes smell nasty and petrol doesnt
    As has already been said, both have their merits, which ever you prefer is immaterial to this thread.
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    (Original post by WilliamWJ)
    **** diesel. petrol is smoother, nicer to drive, more entertaining, and fuel consumption isnt that much of an issue with new petrol cars. You have to drive diesel cars 'harder' to get the same out of them as 'normal' driving would with a petrol of the same power/torque etc.

    did anyone see the fifth gear test recently where two of the same car, one 1.2 petrol, one 1.4? diesel did the same route, and the petrol came out with a better mpg?

    plus diesel fumes smell nasty and petrol doesnt
    thats the first thing i think about when im driving:rolleyes:

    also in a diesel i can hold a car on a hill with no breaks and no gas, petrol you stall on a flat road with no gas.
    i drive a diesel van all day and a petrol when i finish and i much prefer diesel as they are easier to drive.
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    What Turbos are you talking about?

    Sure on my old 2.2 DCi Primera/X Trail a Turbo would be about £1,000. The Injection Pump was £2,300!!

    But on my TDi a New KKK turbo was £180 and a New VE injection pump was £200!!! no expensive at all!

    The PD Injector units are cheaper than a whole injection pump, but there are 4 to replace.
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    (Original post by 1721)
    thats the first thing i think about when im driving:rolleyes:

    also in a diesel i can hold a car on a hill with no breaks and no gas, petrol you stall on a flat road with no gas.
    i drive a diesel van all day and a petrol when i finish and i much prefer diesel as they are easier to drive.
    You can hold a petrol car on a hill using just the clutch too.

    It's called Clutch Control.

    It's bad for your clutch to hold a car on a hill and not use a handbrake.

    My Petrol won't chug along like a diesel when the revs get too low.

    You can't hold a diesel on it's clutch without it moving slightly, you have to go up and down a bit on the pedal.
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    (Original post by 1721)
    thats the first thing i think about when im driving:rolleyes:

    also in a diesel i can hold a car on a hill with no breaks and no gas, petrol you stall on a flat road with no gas.
    i drive a diesel van all day and a petrol when i finish and i much prefer diesel as they are easier to drive.
    i hate driving diesel cars. i used to have a 1.5 dci 2002 clio and it was meant to be a very 'refined' engine. you could tell it was a diesel. driving my mums 1.4 turbo A3 is sooo much nicer.

    ever been stuck behind a smelly old diesel van? closing off the air vents in your own car still does not get rid of that nasty oil burning smell.
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    (Original post by SomeonecalledJohnny)
    You can hold a petrol car on a hill using just the clutch too.

    It's called Clutch Control.

    It's bad for your clutch to hold a car on a hill and not use a handbrake.

    My Petrol won't chug along like a diesel when the revs get too low.

    You can't hold a diesel on it's clutch without it moving slightly, you have to go up and down a bit on the pedal.

    Maybe the fact a Diesel has A LOT more torque near idle than a petrol may assist to pulling off without gas.
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    (Original post by DirtyHarry)
    As I said, Honda engines seem ok being able to rev to near enough twice that.

    That's fine and all but as has been said there are far more naturally aspirated petrol cars than there are with forced induction, certainly when considering mass-market cars where diesels mainly are.
    So buy a Honda? I don't understand what you're trying to achieve here..............

    Hondas are engineered very well. But so are BMW diesel engines?

    Diesel's can't rev high due to more revs, the worse fuel combustion you get.

    Maybe so, but it's not exactley a common thing, turbo failure.

    So far I've done nearly 100k and not had a turbo blow once.
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    (Original post by SomeonecalledJohnny)
    You can hold a petrol car on a hill using just the clutch too.

    It's called Clutch Control.
    yeah but you have to use alot of gas with petrol and its just alot easier in a diesel.
    less chance of stalling really.
    (Original post by WilliamWJ)
    ever been stuck behind a smelly old diesel van? closing off the air vents in your own car still does not get rid of that nasty oil burning smell.
    i drive a smelly old van about and ive never smelt anything that bad
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    (Original post by Friggerpants)
    Whatever, the fact is turbo's go on both fuels, so why should that matter?
    Possibly, because unless you want to actually go anywhere, you are obliged to have a turbocharger on a diesel engine...


    The first thing a Diesel enthusiast will mention when they talk about their cars isn't how it handles, it isn't the power, it isn't the ride, handling, comfort, value etc... it's always how many miles it gets to the gallon. :rolleyes: **YAAAAWN!!!**

    A big petrol engine is where it's at. Fact. :cool:
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    (Original post by 1721)
    yeah but you have to use alot of gas with petrol and its just alot easier in a diesel.
    less chance of stalling really.

    i drive a smelly old van about and ive never smelt anything that bad
    ha i want to find you in a 20 year old transit and hold it at about 4grand infront of you, see how you like it! :p:
 
 
 
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