Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Plan for tuition fees to go up to a possible £7,000 a year? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/lif...cle6727699.ece

    Interesting idea - which may see former polytechnics giving degrees for free, but more prestigious unis charging up to a possible £7,000 a year if they choose to.

    Any thoughts on this? Sorry if it's a re-post.


    Edit: Yeah, and I get the distinct feeling this should be in the Uni Finance section ...
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I'd be lying if I said I wasn't expecting a bigger response :lolwut:
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Speaking as a student at an ex-poly, what a crap idea.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    i would still pay to go to uni
    im not rich but the money doesnt bother me unless they expect me fund it myself
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Craig_D)
    I'd be lying if I said I wasn't expecting a bigger response :lolwut:
    You've not even given it half an hour! :p:

    There was a thread along the same sort of lines yesterday (though from a different angle): http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=977557

    I've not really thought the issue through in much depth before now, but to some extent, it's probably inevitable - many universities just aren't getting enough funding (from fees and government subsidy) to cover the cost of courses, and the money needs to come from somewhere. The government's not really in much of a position to spend considerably more, which leaves this sort of proposal. It's undeniable that the cost of undergraduate courses varies widely, which lends weight to the argument that the fees charged should vary accordingly.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Craig_D)
    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/lif...cle6727699.ece

    Interesting idea - which may see former polytechnics giving degrees for free, but more prestigious unis charging up to a possible £7,000 a year if they choose to.

    Any thoughts on this? Sorry if it's a re-post.


    Edit: Yeah, and I get the distinct feeling this should be in the Uni Finance section ...
    That was the idea for top up fees, but which uni would stick its hand up and say 'im rubbish but cheap!'?

    This isn't news either by any means...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'd still go to uni despite a raise in fees. I think I'd be willing to pay up to £100k for 3 years bachelors. Not that I'm rich, far from it actually. I just find degree level education worth it up to that much and would accept being in huge debts.
    Having said that, I just find the UK's education costs absolutely ridiculous. So many other countries in europe have all unis with no tuition fees not just for their own nationals but all students from EU countries. My dream is to go to University of Copenhagen in denmark, it's just one of the best things I've ever seen in my life!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Illusionary)
    You've not even given it half an hour! :p:

    There was a thread along the same sort of lines yesterday (though from a different angle): http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=977557

    I've not really thought the issue through in much depth before now, but to some extent, it's probably inevitable - many universities just aren't getting enough funding (from fees and government subsidy) to cover the cost of courses, and the money needs to come from somewhere. The government's not really in much of a position to spend considerably more, which leaves this sort of proposal. It's undeniable that the cost of undergraduate courses varies widely, which lends weight to the argument that the fees charged should vary accordingly.
    True :p: I was a little impatient.

    I agree that the raising of fees is inevitable somewhat, with inflation and the credit crunch, reduced public spending, you'd think that they would be shooting up every year. But what I think is weird is a sudden hike where they are doubling the fee.

    Don't get me wrong, I am a Tory (you may throw stones if you want) but this seems like a typically unpopular Tory idea (the kind that made people hate Thatcher and Major) to split the nation - even if Labour are 'involved' (it was even John Denham that suggested it, but it doesn't look left-wing to me ). The effect of this will be to force poorer families into the old polys (because of their need for cheaper fees), while the rich begin to dominate Oxbridge and the other prestigious unis again, because they can afford it, a move that I do not agree with.

    I thought the whole point of all unis being the same price was to give poorer students an equal shot at Oxbridge?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Davy-Jones)
    I'd still go to uni despite a raise in fees. I think I'd be willing to pay up to £100k for 3 years bachelors. Not that I'm rich, far from it actually. I just find degree level education worth it up to that much and would accept being in huge debts.
    Having said that, I just find the UK's education costs absolutely ridiculous. So many other countries in europe have all unis with no tuition fees not just for their own nationals but all students from EU countries. My dream is to go to University of Copenhagen in denmark, it's just one of the best things I've ever seen in my life!
    I don't think we've got it that bad, considering the cost of tuition at some of the Universities in the US.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Davy-Jones)
    I'd still go to uni despite a raise in fees. I think I'd be willing to pay up to £100k for 3 years bachelors. Not that I'm rich, far from it actually. I just find degree level education worth it up to that much and would accept being in huge debts.
    Having said that, I just find the UK's education costs absolutely ridiculous. So many other countries in europe have all unis with no tuition fees not just for their own nationals but all students from EU countries. My dream is to go to University of Copenhagen in denmark, it's just one of the best things I've ever seen in my life!
    So you're happy with 51% income tax on income above 40k?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    This is just depressing. What am I supposed to do.

    My family's combined income is about £38k, it's not the governments definition of poor, I am not entitled to any financial help under the new plans. But 38k isn't a lot, my family can't give me any financial help (my parents don't even have a pension for themselves, let alone savings for anyone else)

    What am I supposed to do? Just accept it and have a ****** unskilled job for the rest of my life? How is this fair.

    People always denounce the system saying "You should be in a uni because of your intellect, not because of your parents' wealth" - but this is the exact same thing in reverse.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by screenager2004)
    This is just depressing. What am I supposed to do.

    My family's combined income is about £38k, it's not the governments definition of poor, I am not entitled to any financial help under the new plans. But 38k isn't a lot, my family can't give me any financial help (my parents don't even have a pension for themselves, let alone savings for anyone else)

    What am I supposed to do? Just accept it and have a ****** unskilled job for the rest of my life? How is this fair.

    People always denounce the system saying "You should be in a uni because of your intellect, not because of your parents' wealth" - but this is the exact same thing in reverse.
    How would this change affect you?

    How are you worse off than pre topup fees when fess were payable in advance?

    38k is higher than the median household income, quite a bit more.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Quady)
    So you're happy with 51% income tax on income above 40k?
    Yep, considering in return you'd get one of the best human index development/quality of life in the whole world.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Davy-Jones)
    Yep, considering in return you'd get one of the best human index development/quality of life in the whole world.
    Don't you get that if you don't go to uni?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Quady)
    Don't you get that if you don't go to uni?
    Ofcourse, anybody and everybody would get that.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Quady)
    How would this change affect you?

    How are you worse off than pre topup fees when fess were payable in advance?

    38k is higher than the median household income, quite a bit more.
    Perhaps it won't make her any worse off, but it makes Oxbridge impossible, doesn't it? They will be the first to start charging £7,000, so poorer students that could have been Oxbridge students will end up at a former poly, because of the pull of the cheaper price. The uni can now raise its price by any amount it wants, up to £7,000, so the way I see it going:

    £7,000: Oxford, Cambridge
    £6,500: Durham, Imperial, LSE
    £6,000: Warwick, York, Exeter, Bristol
    £5,000: Nottingham, Leicester, Birmingham, Loughborough
    £4,000: Sheffield, Leeds, Liverpool
    etc ...(roughly)
    and then Free: Oxford Brookes, De Montford, Nottm Trent, Sheffield Hallam, and so on.

    And suddenly which university you went to is a symbol of how rich you are, rather than your ability.

    Strangely, the effect may be that the better ranking free former polys, like Oxford Brookes (which I think is the highest ranking former poly?) becomes the Oxbridge for 'poor' people, and start getting loads of students that are Oxbridge standard but can't afford it, and maybe they could even start asking for AAA on their popular courses?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Craig_D)
    Perhaps it won't make her any worse off, but it makes Oxbridge impossible, doesn't it? They will be the first to start charging £7,000, so poorer students that could have been Oxbridge students will end up at a former poly, because of the pull of the cheaper price.
    How is it impossible?

    You pay the same in advance so its a one way bet.

    Why do you expect a market in fees this time round when it didn't happen last time?

    You expect on the of the most popular unis (leeds) to only put their prices up by 700 quid?

    Why would polys reduce their prices by over 3k?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Craig_D)
    Perhaps it won't make her any worse off, but it makes Oxbridge impossible, doesn't it? They will be the first to start charging £7,000, so poorer students that could have been Oxbridge students will end up at a former poly, because of the pull of the cheaper price. The uni can now raise its price by any amount it wants, up to £7,000, so the way I see it going:

    £7,000: Oxford, Cambridge
    £6,500: Durham, Imperial, LSE
    £6,000: Warwick, York, Exeter, Bristol
    £5,000: Nottingham, Leicester, Birmingham, Loughborough
    £4,000: Sheffield, Leeds, Liverpool
    etc ...(roughly)
    and then Free: Oxford Brookes, De Montford, Nottm Trent, Sheffield Hallam, and so on.

    And suddenly which university you went to is a symbol of how rich you are, rather than your ability.

    Strangely, the effect may be that the better ranking free former polys, like Oxford Brookes (which I think is the highest ranking former poly?) becomes the Oxbridge for 'poor' people, and start getting loads of students that are Oxbridge standard but can't afford it, and maybe they could even start asking for AAA on their popular courses?
    To be honest, I'd imagine that most of the top universities would go straight for the highest fee possible rather than having as rapid a decline in fee as that. Obviously there's room for interpretation in what would be considered 'top' in this context, but I'd argue that it's certainly more than just Oxbridge. It's not just Oxford and Cambridge where the courses cost a lot to provide, and the number of applicants is such that the quality of applicants wouldn't be substantially affected.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Illusionary)
    To be honest, I'd imagine that most of the top universities would go straight for the highest fee possible rather than having as rapid a decline in fee as that. Obviously there's room for interpretation in what would be considered 'top' in this context, but I'd argue that it's certainly more than just Oxbridge. It's not just Oxford and Cambridge where the courses cost a lot to provide, and the number of applicants is such that the quality of applicants wouldn't be substantially affected.
    This.

    I'd be suprised if the top 15-20 didn't go full fees if it was only a 7k cap.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Craig_D)
    The uni can now raise its price by any amount it wants, up to £7,000, so the way I see it going:

    £7,000: Oxford, Cambridge
    £6,500: Durham, Imperial, LSE
    £6,000: Warwick, York, Exeter, Bristol
    £5,000: Nottingham, Leicester, Birmingham, Loughborough
    £4,000: Sheffield, Leeds, Liverpool
    etc ...(roughly)
    and then Free: Oxford Brookes, De Montford, Nottm Trent, Sheffield Hallam, and so on.
    Dumb. Most would charge the full £7,000 - students wouldn't say "oh I'd rather go to Durham than Oxford to save £500."

    + even dumber that you seem to rank Durham as the 3rd best uni in the country.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.