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    Actually, it was the Muslim Arbitration Tribunal which was quoted in the Times at http://business.timesonline.co.uk/to...cle6721158.ece

    Freed Chedie, a spokesman for Sheikh Faiz-ul-Aqtab Siqqiqi, a barrister who set up the tribunal, said: “We put weight on oral agreements, whereas the British courts do not.”

    In a case last month a non-Muslim Briton took his Muslim business partner to the tribunal to sort out a dispute over the profits in their car fleet company. “The non-Muslim claimed that there had been an oral agreement between the pair,” said Mr Chedie. “The tribunal found that because of certain things the Muslim man did, that agreement had existed. The non-Muslim was awarded £48,000.”


    Interesting to see non-Muslims turning to them.

    In terms of faith-based arbitration tribunals, my general issue is as to who monitors them in terms of the decisions that they make - i.e. to ensure that decisions made are "fair" and don't unlawfully discriminate against people because, for example their gender.
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    Well if their going to get £48,000 then why wouldn't they...:dontknow:
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    He used a Shariah perhaps because his case was so thin it'd have been thrown out of a real court?
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    Now we are beginning to see a glimpse of Shari'ah. It is not all about executions or "barbaric punishments".

    There are stories back when the first generation of Muslims - the companions of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) - used to hold trials, and there were instances where the Muslims did in fact transgress beyond their powers as governors of towns outside of the central city of Madinah. The Khalifah (Caliph) would then judge between them, and there are cases where the non-Muslims were given the right to "discipline" the Muslims, even if they were governors.

    "So if they come to you (O Muhammad), either judge between them, or turn away from them...And if you judge, judge with justice between them. Verily, Allâh loves those who act justly. "

    (Al-Maa'idah - The Table Spread with Food - verse 42)

    Edit: To the person who neg repped me for this post, I am not concerned in the least with regards to reputation. Although, I assume you disapproved of the post since you were "offended". Would you care to enlighten me as to which part it was? Or was it merely because the post came from a Muslim?
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    I think most peoples view of Muslims, Islam and Sharia is very clouded. I am not a Muslim but do like to keep an open mind and the religion is founded on a basis of helping other people and attempting to be good citizens. However, the part most people hear about is the more traditional aspects of Islam, something which doesn't neccessarily fit in with our Western society.
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    In terms of faith-based arbitration tribunals, my general issue is as to who monitors them in terms of the decisions that they make
    This is probably the main probelm with these "Sharia" courts, they have no oversight or national guidlines.
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    (Original post by Longorefisher)
    I think most peoples view of Muslims, Islam and Sharia is very clouded. I am not a Muslim but do like to keep an open mind and the religion is founded on a basis of helping other people and attempting to be good citizens. However, the part most people hear about is the more traditional aspects of Islam, something which doesn't neccessarily fit in with our Western society.
    Realism as opposed to Idealism...
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    I usually find myself defending Sharia courts from those who somehow suggest they are bad without ever actually praising them. I like the idea. Issues like this can be cleared up quickly and efficiently - it's rather like the old practice of finding a village elder and having him rule on a dispute.

    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    In terms of faith-based arbitration tribunals, my general issue is as to who monitors them in terms of the decisions that they make - i.e. to ensure that decisions made are "fair" and don't unlawfully discriminate against people because, for example their gender.
    If one rejects the ruling of a tribunal and is then sued for what they are entitled to in the judgement, matters like that - a sort of legal oversight examining both the law and the tribunal's adherence to its own rules - can take place.
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    I'd lay down my life before Britain ever implements Sharia Law. This one case doesn't mean it's any less repugnant, if you've actually researched the system and the countries which operate it: half by friends would be sentenced to death, for a start.
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    (Original post by 35mm_)
    I'd lay down my life before Britain ever implements Sharia Law. This one case doesn't mean it's any less repugnant, if you've actually researched the system and the countries which operate it: half by friends would be sentenced to death, for a start.
    This is the funniest thing - people who do not understand.

    Shariah courts have NO real legal authority in the UK, just like the Jewish courts don't and NEVER will.

    It is simple 2 parties, consenting to have a decision made in accordance with Islamic Civil law, so can only rule on disputes over money, agreements etc.

    If either party doesn't want a decision through a Islamic 'court', they dont have to. They have no power to summon a witness or a defendant. They can't judge on criminal cases either. So they won't be sentencing to have your hands chopped off if you steal something. :tongue:

    There is no shariah law in the UK and never will be.. Newspapers like the Daily Mail (and I dont criticise them usually) know this, but still decided to run scare mongering, one sided, inaccurate stories about the issue.
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    (Original post by anonymouz)
    Shariah courts have NO real legal authority in the UK, just like the Jewish courts don't and NEVER will.
    Well, their judgements - based on contractual agreement between two parties to enter into arbitration - are legally enforceable.

    (Original post by 35mm_)
    I'd lay down my life before Britain ever implements Sharia Law. This one case doesn't mean it's any less repugnant, if you've actually researched the system and the countries which operate it: half by friends would be sentenced to death, for a start.
    Well, considering the first Islamic Tribunal was set up a good couple of years ago now, when will you be killing yourself?
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    well as long as it all ultimately answers to OUR law..
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Well, their judgements - based on contractual agreement between two parties to enter into arbitration - are legally enforceable.



    Well, considering the first Islamic Tribunal was set up a good couple of years ago now, when will you be killing yourself?
    Ofcourse, or there would be no point to it. I meant at first instance...

    Nobody is going to be dragged off to the local Imam to be punished for adultery.
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    What is the point in this thread? We have British Law as British Citizens.
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    (Original post by Mozzy1411)
    Now we are beginning to see a glimpse of Shari'ah. It is not all about executions or "barbaric punishments".

    There are stories back when the first generation of Muslims - the companions of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) - used to hold trials, and there were instances where the Muslims did in fact transgress beyond their powers as governors of towns outside of the central city of Madinah. The Khalifah (Caliph) would then judge between them, and there are cases where the non-Muslims were given the right to "discipline" the Muslims, even if they were governors.

    "So if they come to you (O Muhammad), either judge between them, or turn away from them...And if you judge, judge with justice between them. Verily, Allâh loves those who act justly. "

    (Al-Maa'idah - The Table Spread with Food - verse 42)
    Do you know how this particular thing works in the UK? Is it a voluntary tribunal sort of thing? What would happen if the guy who lost decided that he didn't want to accept that tribunal judgement?
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    (Original post by Mozzy1411)
    Now we are beginning to see a glimpse of Shari'ah. It is not all about executions or "barbaric punishments".

    There are stories back when the first generation of Muslims - the companions of the Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) - used to hold trials, and there were instances where the Muslims did in fact transgress beyond their powers as governors of towns outside of the central city of Madinah. The Khalifah (Caliph) would then judge between them, and there are cases where the non-Muslims were given the right to "discipline" the Muslims, even if they were governors.

    "So if they come to you (O Muhammad), either judge between them, or turn away from them...And if you judge, judge with justice between them. Verily, Allâh loves those who act justly. "

    (Al-Maa'idah - The Table Spread with Food - verse 42)
    oh ok so as long as it is not ALL about executions or barbaric punishments that makes it ok. am i understanding you correctly
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    now also Britons can escape our law and use Sharia law.This country will be Muslim in 20 years
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    The court can't 'award' the money. It has no jurisdiction beyond personal realm, right?
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Well, considering the first Islamic Tribunal was set up a good couple of years ago now, when will you be killing yourself?
    I meant fully implemented in place of British law.
 
 
 
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