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    (Original post by MrGuillotine)
    To clear up, 1g of pure fat contains 9kcal, while 1g of body fat contains 7.7kcal (equivalent to the figure of 3500kcal/lb of fat).

    In your reply to my first post, the 3500 figure was irrelevent. When Stryer says 15kg has the energy content of 135000kcal he's going on 1g of pure fat = 9kcal. He didnt use the 3500 figure because of the extra water, and since water has no energy value, it would have given a bloated (and false) value.
    I don't understand, why would he be talking about pure fat when that isn't how it's stored in the body? 15kg of pure fat is still 18kg body fat. Body fat percentages are measured using the whole 1lb of body fat, you don't subtract 13% for the water part of the fat cells. You're talking about the way fat enters our bodies when talking about the way we burn fat off. You can't use both, they're different.
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    (Original post by Buster_Bunny)
    theres no way imo, im the same.
    Used to swim competitively for about 6 years, and now i have a large ribcage (so no sexy waist) and broad shoulders. Sucks!
    Apparently the same growth is not true of the IQ or general intelligence level if you believe swimming increases skeletal size.

    You are herby the 'Tard of the day'
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    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    Apparently the same growth is not true of the IQ or general intelligence level if you believe swimming increases skeletal size.

    You are herby the 'Tard of the day'
    It increases ur lung capacity, so now dont u look like the fool.
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    (Original post by Buster_Bunny)
    It increases ur lung capacity, so now dont u look like the fool.
    It increases your lung capacity so forcefully that it makes your ribcage larger? The ribcage is made of bone.
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    (Original post by Chumbaniya)
    It increases your lung capacity so forcefully that it makes your ribcage larger? The ribcage is made of bone.
    Go and look at other competitive female swimmers. Search cassie patten, she went to my school and was in the olympics. Just look at her!
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    (Original post by Buster_Bunny)
    Go and look at other competitive female swimmers. Search cassie patten, she went to my school and was in the olympics. Just look at her!
    That is classic, I didn't know swimmers got brain damage from the water!

    Soft tissue increasing the size of the skeletal frame, hmm, I think not.

    You have now been promoted to Empress Tard, ruler of the Tards of Tradsville, you should be ashamed of your own stupidity!
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    (Original post by ERC')
    Hey, umm not sure if this is true but it might work for you . . .
    do weights for your arms continuously without a rest day.

    A rest day is used for the fibres in your muscles to rebuild themselves hence making the muscle gradually get bigger, so if you were to continually do weights on your arms with no rest day there would be no time for the muscle to rebuild itself therefore it would decrease.
    If we're discussing stupid posts, surely this one needs to be mentioned?!!
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    (Original post by Powerlifter)
    That is classic, I didn't know swimmers got brain damage from the water!

    Soft tissue increasing the size of the skeletal frame, hmm, I think not.

    You have now been promoted to Empress Tard, ruler of the Tards of Tradsville, you should be ashamed of your own stupidity!
    My god, uve gotta be the most pathetic person ever on here.
    Be proud... L. O. L.
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    (Original post by Buster_Bunny)
    Go and look at other competitive female swimmers. Search cassie patten, she went to my school and was in the olympics. Just look at her!
    Hmmm. This could be because her massive lungs have forced her ribcage apart, or it could be because competetive swimmers have larger muscles than most women (especially the lats which are going to make the chest look bigger) and because those who naturally have a larger chest and lung capacity are better suited to become competetive.
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    (Original post by Buster_Bunny)
    My god, uve gotta be the most pathetic person ever on here.
    Be proud... L. O. L.


    OMG, wen i red that I wz lke woteva don't be disrespectin me innit

    Please my dear, if you are going to try to argue then it is advisable to change to the grown up head and leave the Barbie chav head well alone.
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    (Original post by Powerlifter)


    OMG, wen i red that I wz lke woteva don't be disrespectin me innit

    Please my dear, if you are going to try to argue then it is advisable to change to the grown up head and leave the Barbie chav head well alone.
    :sheep:

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    (Original post by Brotherhood)
    I don't understand, why would he be talking about pure fat when that isn't how it's stored in the body? 15kg of pure fat is still 18kg body fat. Body fat percentages are measured using the whole 1lb of body fat, you don't subtract 13% for the water part of the fat cells. You're talking about the way fat enters our bodies when talking about the way we burn fat off. You can't use both, they're different.
    15kg of pure fat does not have the same energy content as 15kg body fat; it has more, 9kcal/g compared to 7.7kcal/g. (body fat has energy-void water making up the extra weight)

    Its the 15kg out of the 18kg body fat which actually has an energy value, and thus it is the 15kg that is used when determining how much energy our fat stores can give us. You can add 3kg of water to 15kg of pure fat, it won't affect its energy content.

    Body fat percentages aren't designed to deal with energy values; they're more interested in amount of body fat, which is why they take into account the 13% water content.
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    (Original post by MrGuillotine)
    15kg of pure fat does not have the same energy content as 15kg body fat; it has more, 9kcal/g compared to 7.7kcal/g. (body fat has energy-void water making up the extra weight)

    Its the 15kg out of the 18kg body fat which actually has an energy value, and thus it is the 15kg that is used when determining how much energy our fat stores can give us. You can add 3kg of water to 15kg of pure fat, it won't affect its energy content.

    Body fat percentages aren't designed to deal with energy values; they're more interested in amount of body fat, which is why they take into account the 13% water content.
    You're talking about human energy stores. We don't have pure fat. The energy in 15kg pure fat IS the energy in 18kg of body fat, so saying that a person has a certain amount of energy and therefore a certain amount of fat is only true if you count the water. The water is part of the cell. It's therefore only true to say that a person has 135,000Kcal of energy if they have 18kg body fat.

    But we're just splitting hairs.
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    (Original post by Brotherhood)
    You're talking about human energy stores. We don't have pure fat. The energy in 15kg pure fat IS the energy in 18kg of body fat, so saying that a person has a certain amount of energy and therefore a certain amount of fat is only true if you count the water. The water is part of the cell. It's therefore only true to say that a person has 135,000Kcal of energy if they have 18kg body fat.

    But we're just splitting hairs.
    Ah OK I see where you're coming from. Yeah, you're right 18kg body fat has 135,000kcal of energy, but my point was just that its the 15kg out of that 18kg which contributes to the 135,000kcal of energy as the rest is by and large just water, which is why the book mentioned 15kg.

    Cool, I think we're in agreement.
 
 
 
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