Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Thread for people who don't like snobby people who put down Art's degree's!!! Watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chumbaniya)
    Bitter much y'all?
    I believe it's quite a normal reaction to be a little irate when you feel people are belittling your achievements.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    I suppose because Fine Art isn't an academic subject, as such.
    Yes it is. http://www.ruskin-sch.ox.ac.uk/admissions/criteria_bfa/
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jormungandr)
    I believe it's quite a normal reaction to be a little irate when you feel people are belittling your achievements.
    Surely it's better to ignore people or tell them why they're wrong? I imagine that there's a lot of bitterness amongst certain arts students because they are actually aware that their degrees are less valuable to employers and in many cases they don't do courses as challenging as those who do science degrees.

    Blanket statements are unfair, though, since there seems to be a lot of variation within the arts. I know from my experience that historians here actually have a big workload, whilst english students have barely anything to do, and that's just within one university.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I just try and look down on all degrees equally really, solves the issue :yes:
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fire2burn)
    So History is a complete and utter waste of time is it? We should only live in the present and completely disregard the past?

    The fact of the matter is you're not going to get a well rounded view of History particularly if you want to work in the field if you're just reading selected books from your local town library, tuition in the area is on the whole necessary. With strong competition for jobs a degree is usually a minimum requirement now.

    Just because you lack the insight into what you can do with a History degree doesn't mean you should slate it otherwise people are simply going to say Economics? That means you can only work in a bank right :/
    What do you mean by that? Of course Economists are not only desired by banks - they are needed across the whole of the services industry because the analytical and numerical skills we learn are invaluable in the industry. You may learn analytical skills in History, but do you learn any numerical? I don't think so. I guess if you want to be limited being a librarian or archiving as someone else suggested then go ahead and study it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chumbaniya)
    Surely it's better to ignore people or tell them why they're wrong? I imagine that there's a lot of bitterness amongst certain arts students because they are actually aware that their degrees are less valuable to employers and in many cases they don't do courses as challenging as those who do science degrees.

    Blanket statements are unfair, though, since there seems to be a lot of variation within the arts. I know from my experience that historians here actually have a big workload, whilst english students have barely anything to do, and that's just within one university.
    Perhaps that is ideal, and in the post before I responded to before the one you quoted I did exactly that. The issue is that people mocking arts degrees on this website are so common and rebuttals so plentiful that it sometimes feels rather infuriating and pointless to even try any more.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jormungandr)
    There's so many ridiculous claims in here that I am going to break them down one by one.


    Many of the subjects studied as Arts are as old as the concept of universities themselves, at least in the west (I.e., circa 12th century.) These same subjects cover topic widely regarded as valid academic endeavours. There is not a glut of employers refusing to hire arts degrees, and if arts degrees were bad there would be. Ergo, by reasonable criteria, arts degrees are 'proper degrees'.


    Some sciences can be studied in your own time, too, most notably mathematics and your own subject of economics (as much as that is a 'science'). That you can study arts at home ignores the point of an arts degree; that you are in contact with some of the most knowledgeable people in the world for that field. It also ignores that the value of the degree is also in part the formal recognition that you are capable of succeeding in academic endeavour at that level, and thus have the skills associated with that.


    You have the support and contact with tutors who have office hours. It also means you have to do your own research, which as noted is a valuable skill (and demonstrates you can work unsupervised and are a self-starter).


    I think it is quite worthwhile, thank you, and to be awfully frank I'm not sure how arrogant you seem declaring others' passions to not be 'worthwhile' because you don't like them.


    Of all the things you've said this is probably the one that is most demonstrably not the case. History can lead to a career in archives, and archives are a crucial service for business, local government, etc. If you want to trace your family, you visit an archive and get help from a professional archivist. This is contributing to the community in a very real sense.

    If your view of 'contributing anything to the community' is limited to only the production of new material goods, then I really do feel sorry for you.
    You obviously know I am telling the truth otherwise you wouldn't feel the need to defend your degree. Does this country really need 5000+ odd new archivers every year? I beleive not lol. It is obviously a good idea to study a subject you enjoy at university, but not being realistic and studying any other degree is a waste of time in my opinion. Clearly you think otherwise or else you wouldn't want to be in 20 k+ debt just to be an archiver.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    What do you mean by that? Of course Economists are not only desired by banks - they are needed across the whole of the services industry because the analytical and numerical skills we learn are invaluable in the industry. You may learn analytical skills in History, but do you learn any numerical? I don't think so. I guess if you want to be limited being a librarian or archiving as someone else suggested then go ahead and study it.
    My mother is an accountant. She studied English. Basic numeracy is required for many positions. Advanced mathematics is required for comparatively few.

    Speaking as someone who plans to be an archivist, I am slightly insulted by the suggestion that doing history 'limited' me to the career. Not to mention that history, and most 'good' arts, are broadly employable and successful in a wide range of fields, including the civil service, law, marketing, etc. The proof in the pudding is that most jobs are non-specific regarding the subject you studied in university. If arts degrees really were that bad employment-wise, there would be such demands.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jormungandr)
    My mother is an accountant. She studied English. Basic numeracy is required for many positions. Advanced mathematics is required for comparatively few.

    Speaking as someone who plans to be an archivist, I am slightly insulted by the suggestion that doing history 'limited' me to the career. Not to mention that history, and most 'good' arts, are broadly employable and successful in a wide range of fields, including the civil service, law, marketing, etc. The proof in the pudding is that most jobs are non-specific regarding the subject you studied in university. If arts degrees really were that bad employment-wise, there would be such demands.
    You just contradicted yourself there. First you said people study art degrees because they are passionate about it, and now you are saying they study it because there is a good demand for art graduates? Please clarify yourself.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    It's usually snobby people that have the money to afford doing an Arts degree. I need to do something that leads onto a high-earning career. You ******s can do your english literature and fine art because Daddy's bank is gunna bail you out when you realise nobody is gunna employ you.

    If you're doing an Arts degree, from a mediocre uni, and you're family is poor. You're ****** imo.

    And I have a neg-shield, so don't even bother.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    You obviously know I am telling the truth otherwise you wouldn't feel the need to defend your degree.
    This truly is a brilliant argument. I can see it being used in court, very effectively. "AHA! You're defending your client from his theft charges, so he must be guilty!"

    Does this country really need 5000+ odd new archivers every year? I beleive not lol.
    Considering the lack of qualified archivists in the UK, we certainly seem to need more. Are you simply being facetious in your claim that I am implying that all history grads should contribute by becoming archivists, or is your thinking really that inflexible?

    It is obviously a good idea to study a subject you enjoy at university, but not being realistic and studying any other degree is a waste of time in my opinion.
    I am being realistic. When I graduate, I will have built up the means to enter a rewarding career. As far as I know, there hasn't been a mountain of unemployable arts graduates (any more than is currently caused by the recession, anyway) so evidently even by your criteria it isn't a waste of time.

    Clearly you think otherwise or else you wouldn't want to be in 20 k+ debt just to be an archiver.
    Yes, when I have a career that has excellent work/life balance, professional development opportunities, and high levels of personal and professional satisfaction I shall cry myself to sleep over why I didn't do a 'real' subject.

    Also, the position title is 'archivist'. Please get it right, it makes you look stupid otherwise. After all, as an economist you can always become a 'bankist'...
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Aw, ProspectivEEconomist ignored me. :p:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    You just contradicted yourself there. First you said people study art degrees because they are passionate about it, and now you are saying they study it because there is a good demand for art graduates? Please clarify yourself.
    There was no contradiction. I did not say that people study arts because there is good demand for any subject graduates, but rather that the argument that arts graduates are unemployable doesn't stand up to scrutiny.

    Clear enough?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    My shield is weaker. But I am unscathed.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    This argument is stupid. People get degrees in the arts to become artists or whatever like people who get degrees in the sciences do it to become scientists. Stop thinking your existence is more pointful because you have a degree in engineering/history of arts; it's not. Gisele Bundchen will still make more a year than you'll probably make in a lifetime because she's better looking than you.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Navras)
    It's usually snobby people that have the money to afford doing an Arts degree. I need to do something that leads onto a high-earning career. You ******s can do your english literature and fine art because Daddy's bank is gunna bail you out when you realise nobody is gunna employ you.

    If you're doing an Arts degree, from a mediocre uni, and you're family is poor. You're ****** imo.

    And I have a neg-shield, so don't even bother.
    I am a working class person now studying an arts degree at St Andrews (Philosophy with History, if you must know). My degree costs exactly the same as a science degree. It would be rude to say what my father earns, but he's not exactly going to be able to bail me out, let's put it that way.

    Plenty of people studying arts do a postgrad law conversion, and law currently stands as the best paid graduate profession (on average).

    But hey, don't let the facts get in the way of a good rant, eh?
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    What do you mean by that? Of course Economists are not only desired by banks - they are needed across the whole of the services industry because the analytical and numerical skills we learn are invaluable in the industry. You may learn analytical skills in History, but do you learn any numerical? I don't think so. I guess if you want to be limited being a librarian or archiving as someone else suggested then go ahead and study it.
    When you lack as much foresight as that it's no wonder you have so much neg rep. You think History and arts subjects limit you to archiving and being a librarian? My neighbour who works for Goldman sachs doesn't even have an economics or maths degree, he read English at KCL and is doing rather well with his 6 figure salary.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jormungandr)
    I am a working class person now studying an arts degree at . My degree costs exactly the same as a science degree. It would be rude to say what my father earns, but he's not exactly going to be able to bail me out, let's put it that way.

    Plenty of people studying arts do a postgrad law conversion, and law currently stands as the best paid graduate profession (on average).

    But hey, don't let the facts get in the way of a good rant, eh?
    Law is VERY competitive.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Navras)
    Law is VERY competitive.
    Yes, having researched law for about half a year I am well aware of this. It was a challenge to the idea that arts degrees are unemployable, which they are not. If science graduates were so much better, law firms would be very keen on having them compared to arts students. In reality, science students applying for law may be seen as a bit strange (especially if their first degree is in something like computer science.)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jormungandr)
    Yes, having researched law for about half a year I am well aware of this. It was a challenge to the idea that arts degrees are unemployable, which they are not. If science graduates were so much better, law firms would be very keen on having them compared to arts students. In reality, science students applying for law may be seen as a bit strange (especially if their first degree is in something like computer science.)
    You're wrong, physicists and engineers convert to Law. Speifically patent law.
 
 
 
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 28, 2009
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources
    Uni match

    Applying to uni?

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course

    Articles:

    Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

    Quick link:

    Educational debate unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.