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Thread for people who don't like snobby people who put down Art's degree's!!! watch

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    (Original post by Navras)
    You're wrong, physicists and engineers convert to Law. Speifically patent law.
    Yes, and intellectual property law. As I said, 'may'. Certainly, if you look at the profile pages of most law firms you'll see a clear lean towards arts degrees.
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    (Original post by Navras)
    It's usually snobby people that have the money to afford doing an Arts degree. I need to do something that leads onto a high-earning career. You ******s can do your english literature and fine art because Daddy's bank is gunna bail you out when you realise nobody is gunna employ you.

    If you're doing an Arts degree, from a mediocre uni, and you're family is poor. You're ****** imo.

    And I have a neg-shield, so don't even bother.
    wtf?! daddy's bank is in debt im afraid, but daddy wants his daughter to be happy beacuse she is doing something she enjoys!
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    im tired of this debate now! :wavey: gonna have a rest from tsr!
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    (Original post by fire2burn)
    When you lack as much foresight as that it's no wonder you have so much neg rep. You think History and arts subjects limit you to archiving and being a librarian? My neighbour who works for Goldman sachs doesn't even have an economics or maths degree, he read English at KCL and is doing rather well with his 6 figure salary.
    Yeah my neighbour is the CEO of BCG as well innit and she did a BA in fine art. Oh, and I get neg rep because people can't face the truth - these weak students/graduates live in a bubble.
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    (Original post by robbo3045)
    What pretentious bull crap.

    What you are saying is Maths is more important TO YOU.
    No, maths is objectively beautiful. It is the language of the universe.
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    (Original post by jismith1989)
    Yes it is. http://www.ruskin-sch.ox.ac.uk/admissions/criteria_bfa/
    The Ruskin college has always been an exception.
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    (Original post by Jormungandr)
    My mother is an accountant. She studied English. Basic numeracy is required for many positions. Advanced mathematics is required for comparatively few.

    Speaking as someone who plans to be an archivist, I am slightly insulted by the suggestion that doing history 'limited' me to the career. Not to mention that history, and most 'good' arts, are broadly employable and successful in a wide range of fields, including the civil service, law, marketing, etc. The proof in the pudding is that most jobs are non-specific regarding the subject you studied in university. If arts degrees really were that bad employment-wise, there would be such demands.
    Actuary work and front/middle office IB spring to mind here. Also any sort of government job which requires modeling and statistics.
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    (Original post by Flying Scotsman)
    Actuary work and front/middle office IB spring to mind here. Also any sort of government job which requires modeling and statistics.
    'Comparatively few'. Most graduate jobs are not FO IB, actuary, statistics, etc.
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    (Original post by Nutta!)
    As a person doing a science based degree, I think arts students are truely amamzing and I think you are far more intelligent than me.

    I envy you
    haha. What a joke. What are you studying? Media-Science at Luton University?
    The reason why people put down Arts degrees is because most of them have little/no real world value. Arts are for people who don't have the brain for maths.
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    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    It's because Art degrees are not proper degrees. You can study them in your spare time - why do you need to go to university to do it? You only get a few hours of lectures per week, so in my opinion it is a total waste of time. Dedicate your life to something worthwhile. You will not contribute anything to the community by studying history/english etc
    Are u serious?? Yes lets all be economists ...great society that would make



    pfttt
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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    The Ruskin college has always been an exception.
    What makes it specifically exceptional?
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    (Original post by Flying Scotsman)
    No, maths is objectively beautiful. It is the language of the universe.
    To YOU.
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    (Original post by Jormungandr)
    'Comparatively few'. Most graduate jobs are not FO IB, actuary, statistics, etc.
    A few thousand and then 40% of graduate jobs require a specific degree.
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    (Original post by Jormungandr)
    Yes, and intellectual property law. As I said, 'may'. Certainly, if you look at the profile pages of most law firms you'll see a clear lean towards arts degrees.
    I don't know any statistics of british universities but Economics is the most popular bachelors to take at Harvard if you want to get into law.
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    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    A few thousand and then 40% of graduate jobs require a specific degree.
    'Comparatively few' means 'significantly less than the majority'. How many jobs do you think need advanced mathematics as opposed to basic numeracy? 5%? 10%?

    The original point for that post was specifically about the number of jobs available that involve degree-level mathematics.

    Also, the fact that 40% of jobs require specific degrees does not mean a great deal. Aside from the fact that's still a minority, that 40% require degrees does not mean that any given science degree can access them. Some of those jobs require qualifying psychology degrees, information science degrees, medicine degrees, etc. If you do economics, those are as inaccessible to you as they are to me with philosophy/history (without further qualifications, of course.)
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    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    I don't know any statistics of british universities but Economics is the most popular bachelors to take at Harvard if you want to get into law.
    I agree with economics being popular for law, but then again economics is not a science in the same way physics, biology, chemistry, etc. are.
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    [QUOTE=Jormungandr]'Comparatively few' means 'significantly less than the majority'. How many jobs do you think need advanced mathematics as opposed to basic numeracy? 5%? 10%?

    The original point for that post was specifically about the number of jobs available that involve degree-level mathematics.

    Also, the fact that 40% of jobs require specific degrees does not mean a great deal. Aside from the fact that's still a minority, that 40% require degrees does not mean that any given science degree can access them. Some of those jobs require qualifying psychology degrees, information science degrees, medicine degrees, etc. If you do economics, those are as inaccessible to you as they are to me with philosophy/history (without further qualifications, of course.)[/QUOTE]

    These further qualifications, such as Msc in Finance, I.T. etc, require a bachelors with a significant proportion of maths so therefore you can rule out degrees like history etc (but are accessible to economists as almost half of our degree involves maths and econometrics).
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    I haven't gone through the whole thread but I think the reason why it's looked down upon, by some people, is because you don't necessarily need to do an arts degree to land a job in that field. If you're naturally creative (which, IMO, you cannot really teach), then you'd get more out of experience than 3 years in uni. Therefore, people call it 'mickey mouse' studies for the reason that you don't *need* to be at uni but still get to enjoy the uni lifestyle of partying/socialising without the work being as difficult. Plus, with art subjects being a lot more subjective, it's easier to "BS" your way through (not saying everyone does, but I do know people who have).
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Who is Art?
    Subtle.
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    (Original post by prospectivEEconomist)
    (Original post by Jormungandr)
    'Comparatively few' means 'significantly less than the majority'. How many jobs do you think need advanced mathematics as opposed to basic numeracy? 5%? 10%?

    The original point for that post was specifically about the number of jobs available that involve degree-level mathematics.

    Also, the fact that 40% of jobs require specific degrees does not mean a great deal. Aside from the fact that's still a minority, that 40% require degrees does not mean that any given science degree can access them. Some of those jobs require qualifying psychology degrees, information science degrees, medicine degrees, etc. If you do economics, those are as inaccessible to you as they are to me with philosophy/history (without further qualifications, of course.)
    These further qualifications, such as Msc in Finance, I.T. etc, require a bachelors with a significant proportion of maths so therefore you can rule out degrees like history etc (but are accessible to economists as almost half of our degree involves maths and econometrics).
    What is the deal with your love of making tangential points? Your original claim was that 40% of graduate positions are not open to arts, but nor are they all necessarily open to science students. What you say about Finance/IT is true, but that still doesn't counter the point being made; that many jobs are open to arts students, and that the 40% figure is misleading because a fair chunk of those are equally accessible or inaccessible to either group.

    (Original post by ogloom)
    haha. What a joke. What are you studying? Media-Science at Luton University?
    The reason why people put down Arts degrees is because most of them have little/no real world value. Arts are for people who don't have the brain for maths.
    DUH, ME NO SPEKEE ENGLISH. U TALK SIMPLE PLICKS?

    Shame doing a maths degree won't stop you being arrogant and unlikeable.

    Look, historically, at who the brightest minds in history were. You'll notice that many are scientists, many others are philosophers, others are historians, others are sociologists. This is not a coincidence, because to push forward the boundaries of all these areas you have to be very intelligent indeed. Unless you're claiming that individuals like Hume, Kant, etc were just secretly too stupid for maths.
 
 
 
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