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    (Original post by katierattray)
    lol, doctors know when people lie.
    I'm pretty sure that's not universally true.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    I'm pretty sure that's not universally true.
    ok then they can tell most of the time.
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    Serious question here, I have always had small man boobs even when thin so now im overweight they stand out I get jokes from girls at uni saying they wish they had boobs the shape and size of mine, they dont jiggle or wobble like people grossly overweight but even Id say that they are curvy.

    Would the NHS find some way of removing/getting them down to right size.
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    I want a bigger penis. Can I have free penis enhancement surgery or something?



    But seriously. How do they figure giving a woman a boob job will improve her quality of life any more than giving the OP's mother surgery on her legs, which are in pain? That's just ridiculous. I don't care how devastatingly low your body image is, you can get therapy for that.
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    (Original post by elixira)
    I don't wanna judge her or the situation, but I honestly don't believe having small boobs can cause depression they should have treated it with decent therapy or even meds.

    Just to clarify, it was on the NHS, right?
    Look at it this way (and I'm not saying I fully agree with the approach, either). Having a figure you're not happy with can cause someone to feel depressed - simple fact. Usually, doctors simply hand out drugs to everyone who's unable to deal with their own problem, just to stifle that problem.
    With the aforementioned girl, they've actually bothered to deal with the underlying cause (that this girl is unhappy with a specific thing in her life - which is all depression is).
    Now, I'm not saying this was the best course of action to take, over counselling to deal more fully with the root of the problem (her insecurity as a whole) but she's received much better treatment than most diagnosed with 'depression'.
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    People who have BDD or depression regarding their boob size perhaps need therapy or meds rather than surgery. Not only is surgery very costly for the state , it has risks and personally I would rather spend an hour with cherie Blair than have an op in an nhs hospital if I could avoid it.

    We have people on waiting lists for all sorts of painful and life threatening conditions. Yet we have people who are also on these lists who really aren't physically ill but feel bad about their bodies I feel very sorry for them, I have BDD myself and consulted plastic surgeons in Harley street who told me they were not prepared to help me because of my mental health condition but really while people might not like to hear it.The NHS has to ration health care.

    It is a hard fact.I don't understand why these ops are being done at all at taxpayers expense and perhaps forcing actually sick people to wait longer.
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    (Original post by katierattray)
    lol, doctors know when people lie.
    doctors aren't superhuman
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    Look at it this way (and I'm not saying I fully agree with the approach, either). Having a figure you're not happy with can cause someone to feel depressed - simple fact. Usually, doctors simply hand out drugs to everyone who's unable to deal with their own problem, just to stifle that problem.
    With the aforementioned girl, they've actually bothered to deal with the underlying cause (that this girl is unhappy with a specific thing in her life - which is all depression is).
    Now, I'm not saying this was the best course of action to take, over counselling to deal more fully with the root of the problem (her insecurity as a whole) but she's received much better treatment than most diagnosed with 'depression'.
    Yeah that's quite an accurate assessment. I'm not sure why people are so outraged about this.... What about braces for your teeth? All children who have slightly wonky teeth get these now - the teeth don't often pose major problems in terms of pain or long term problems, the whole thing now is largely cosmetic. The NHS funds braces for children.

    You see perfect breasts all over the media so it's very easy to get a severe fixation on them not being adequate - I still don't like mine all that much and I'd say I'm pretty confident in my looks overall.

    I think obviously the system needs improvement if people in pain are overlooked but I don't think breast surgery is totally irrational. Perhaps society's call for perfect breasts is irrational however if someone is suffering major problems because of that, it is easier for that person's life to fix it quickly. Although, this does feed back into the image of perfection if even the medical profession agree that not having perfect breasts are worth getting upset about, but then the same could be said for fixing everyone's teeth.
    The problem with breasts is that it's purely a female thing so it's an uneven expectation that women must look a certain way therefore there's a sexual power shift because if your breasts don't they are therefore unattractive to men (if you take the media angle where pretty much every woman on tv is hot). This is more damaging than the teeth issue where everyone is 'fixed'.
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    (Original post by elixira)
    Touché, they're perfect.

    But I still don't think having a flat chest can cause depression. You can be flat-chested and happy. And what are the chances that after a boob job, the girl finds another part of her body that makes her 'depressed'?

    Tbh, if someone's that bothered by it they should save up and frickin pay for the op.
    Ooh it did sound a little touché - my bad, I didn't mean it in a harsh way :o: I just meant that if you haven't got a flat chest then I guess you can never know whether it can cause depression. I've got pretty small boobs and i'm happy but I can understand how some people might not be, however I wouldn't encourage them to have a boob job like you said it's probably better she gets psycho-therapy to deal with her issues as you don't know where the self-esteem issues will end :dontknow:

    But yes, I don't think they should get it on the NHS.
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    It's aweful, if you're depressed about your body you've gotta deal with it yourself, not waste taxpayers money on a nice new pair.
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    Having had two breast ops myself I know quite a bit about this. I was unfortunate enough to have suspected cancer in both cases and the ops were to remove lumps. The NHS will only do an augmentation for purely cosmetic reasons in very rare cases. Most of the time it is because someone has a medical reason such as an abnormal lump or asymmetric breasts. I doubt anyone would deny someone with cancer or an abnormal lump the right to have surgery on the NHS. I also don't think it's unfair to offer someone with asymmetric breasts the right to have one reduced or implanted to make them equal, especially if the difference is by a few cups sizes. I doubt there are any NHS drs who will give a 16 year old Jordan wannabe a boob job just because they feel insecure. If they are completely flat chested they may be offered an augmentation but only by a couple of cup sizes, they'll hardly be given implants big enough to be the next Jordan. I was also under the impression that if someone wanted implants because they were insecure they have to be older than 16, say 18 or 21 or over and would need to go through all sorts of other options before going under the knife.
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    I object to my taxes paying for confidence boosters when some people can't get life saving drugs because they live in the wrong area, it's sick.
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    I can understand people being given breast reductions on the NHS if they're too large and are causing severe back problems and obviously people who have had to have masectomies being offered reconstructive surgery, but to me handing out boob jobs to insecure people is not getting to the route of the problem.

    They should be advised to seek counselling to get to the bottom of it. If someone's depressed, I don't believe having bigger boobs will magically make it better, they might find something else they don't like about themselves so they do we offer surgery for that? The NHS is under-funded and over-stretched so expensive surgery should be avoided where it's not a purely physically problem that can be solved by it.
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    What the...

    This money could be invested into the Medical and Dental schools for clinical practice because that is very expensive and employers now say that graduates do not get enough practice before they go out into the real world clinics.

    Well, this is what my dentist told me anyway. In years 4 and 5, they treat around 4-5 patients a day but in their vocational training years, they have a massive jump and treat around 25 patients a day.

    What a waste of money especially in a time of recession...
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    I feel self-concious about having to wear glasses. Where's my laser eye treatment NHS?
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    if you are flat chested you can get a free boob job....i know someone who is havin it done
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    (Original post by Webstersss)
    My girlfriends boobs are too small for me, can NHS help to improve my life too?
    :rofl:
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    Excuse me if I'm being naive, but is it not possible that some people could be depressed purely because of the shape of their body?
    BDD, anorexia, bulemia...
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    its true, they give away boob jobs, only if there are serios pysch issues but whatever dude, some people can't see and they get **** all, i think its ridiculus.
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    (Original post by Ilora-Danon)
    Surely ALL people with mental health issues deserve to be treated with the same level of importance? You can't say one person's mental illness is more deserving of treatment than anothers'. That's extremely judgmental and the whole point of the medical profession is to be completely unbiased.
    Treatment yes, thousands of pounds worth of unnecessary surgery no.
 
 
 
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