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How much does uni name + degree class determine your job/salary? watch

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    How much does your university reputation and degree classification determine your job/salary?
    For example (intentionally picking a competative field), if one is to graduate from a uni like say QMUL with a first class honours in economics...do they have as much of a chance to get into a career like investment banking as one with a first from say UCL? Not just for investment banking in particular, just thought I'd pick a competative field for this example.

    So how much are university reputation and degree classification factors in determining future job prospects and salary, and even future in the career...do these factors have any part to play when people are promoted to executive level/managerial jobs?
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    (Original post by Davy-Jones)
    How much does your university reputation and degree classification determine your job/salary?
    For example (intentionally picking a competative field), if one is to graduate from a uni like say QMUL with a first class honours in economics...do they have as much of a chance to get into a career like investment banking as one with a first from say UCL? Not just for investment banking in particular, just thought I'd pick a competative field for this example.

    So how much are university reputation and degree classification factors in determining future job prospects and salary, and even future in the career...do these factors have any part to play when people are promoted to executive level/managerial jobs?
    Before any of the rest get a chance to soil this thread, I will comment. There's no clear cut answer. A first degree is respectable from any institution so immediately you'll stand out from the majority of candidates.

    In real life, which university you go to doesn't make much difference to employment prospects, it's what class degree you got/what kind of work experience you have/what kind of person you are that seals the deal.

    Now watch and see what the rest of this forum thinks.
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    (Original post by Davy-Jones)
    How much does your university reputation and degree classification determine your job/salary?
    For example (intentionally picking a competative field), if one is to graduate from a uni like say QMUL with a first class honours in economics...do they have as much of a chance to get into a career like investment banking as one with a first from say UCL? Not just for investment banking in particular, just thought I'd pick a competative field for this example.

    So how much are university reputation and degree classification factors in determining future job prospects and salary, and even future in the career...do these factors have any part to play when people are promoted to executive level/managerial jobs?
    Yes, they do initially.

    But in the end, theyre just peices of paper.

    You make things happen for yourself.

    I'd say 80% of the worlds billionares didnt even attend college.

    They all did, however, work their arse off for the money
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    Very detrimental and DO NOT listen to the dumbasses who say it doesn't because most of them go to the lowest of the low universities and are trying to comfort their own failure with their wishful thinking.
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    Degree class is very important. Uni name is less so, but I suppose every little helps.
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    Degree class is very important. Uni name is less so, but I suppose every little helps.
    That's just completely incorrect. It's far closer to being the opposite.
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    (Original post by MichaelScofield)
    That's just completely incorrect. It's far closer to being the opposite.
    Are you serious? There's a reason most graduate programs including those in accounting, banking, law, etc. require a 2.1. They don't make exceptions for Oxbridge graduates with less than that, and if they do it's for reasons other than their university.
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    I have a feeling that most of the people who will post a response to this are either undergrad students, or not even in uni yet - so you're not really going to get a reasonable answer - those that go to a 'top' uni will say the name is important, those that don't will say its not - the only people who's opinions matter are employers, so I suggest getting in contact with the HR/Recruiter in the area you want to work in and try wrangle an answer out of them - because answers from people who haven't graduated and aren't employing people are going to be matters of opinion rather than facts you can depend upon.
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    As far as I know for competitive fields such as IB it comes down to:
    Did they get a 2:1/1:1.
    Did they graduate from Oxford, Cambridge or LSE.

    I'm not exactly as expert though.

    I also know Imperial graduates have good prospects. Someone said in the CompSci forum so take it with a pinch of salt that the average CompSci student from Imperial has a starting wage of 30k+ :O

    So the institute name on that piece of paper is important yes, at least from the information I've been given.
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    You only need to look at the entry requirements for many graduate schemes, which typically require a 2:1 and a certain number of UCAS points, to see that where you got your degree from does matter. Why would they use A-level results to select candidates instead of increasing the minimum classification to a 1:1? Because students with top A-level results go to the top universities and they would rather have someone who got a 2:1 at Russell Group university that a 1:1 at a former polytechnic. I'm not saying it's fair, but that's how it appears to be.
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    There are a few jobs out there that target graduates of certain universities, and for these, institution name is pretty important. However, we're talking about a few hundred out of 300,000 graduates, so I'm happy to write off that 0.2% for now. All the evidence we have on this points to institution name not mattering as much as you think, and it being used as one of the last things (if at all) to split two very even candidates. In other words, its pretty insignificant in a lot of cases. Degree class matters more- but the difference isn't between a first and a 2:1, its between the all-important 2:1 and lower grades. A bigger difference still is the degree subject, which has been totally missed on this thread so far.

    Thats really all there is to it. Although I must be biased saying that name/getting a first doesn't matter while degree subject does, since I obviously missed out on a first, went to an ex-poly, and hate arts grads...



    Oh, wait, no, sorry... I'm the opposite.
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    What's a 1:1?
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    What's a 1:1?
    Really a First degree. No such thing as 1.1
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    1st class honours?
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    (Original post by 0_YouKnowIt)
    Really a First degree. No such thing as 1.1
    Congrats. You got my joke.
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    (Original post by Lrilol)
    As far as I know for competitive fields such as IB it comes down to:
    Did they get a 2:1/1:1.
    Did they graduate from Oxford, Cambridge or LSE.

    I'm not exactly as expert though.

    I also know Imperial graduates have good prospects. Someone said in the CompSci forum so take it with a pinch of salt that the average CompSci student from Imperial has a starting wage of 30k+ :O

    So the institute name on that piece of paper is important yes, at least from the information I've been given.
    I'd say some people are dragging down the average, then. One of my flat mates is on a work placement with Morgan Stanley for 6 months earning £36k pro rata, and she'll probably get a full time job with them paying the same if not more.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Congrats. You got my joke.
    Ahaha!
    It realy seemed like you were clueless.
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    (Original post by ashy)
    I'd say some people are dragging down the average, then. One of my flat mates is on a work placement with Morgan Stanley for 6 months earning £36k pro rata, and she'll probably get a full time job with them paying the same if not more.
    Is she an Imperial graduate then?
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    (Original post by 0_YouKnowIt)
    Is she an Imperial graduate then?
    No, 3rd year (well, 4th year now I guess) compsci undergrad.

    I'm a graduate :proud:
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    Are you serious? There's a reason most graduate programs including those in accounting, banking, law, etc. require a 2.1. They don't make exceptions for Oxbridge graduates with less than that, and if they do it's for reasons other than their university.
    You really are a fool. To obtain a 2.1 from Oxbridge is substantially harder than, say, a former poly. This means that you will (generally) be more intelligent, dedicated, harder-working, capable, able to realise your potential etc. than a graduate with a 2.1 from an ex-poly. Obviously, to appear politically correct, (large) firms will not (possibly even cannot?) state university preferences. However, do you really believe that, given the interviewer will have had alot of experience of how new recruits progress, he/she is not going to know that graduates from better universities with a given classification are (generally) better suited to the job? Even if they were completely impartial and/or inexperienced, this fact would quickly become evident after the graduates from better universities (generally) will do better in the various tests, group sessions, application forms, initial interviews etc. There is a reason why, if you go to an insight day at a large financial services firm, almost all the graduates you talk to will have gone to a top twenty-ish university. There are of course exceptions in that some people will have underachieved at school but started working at university, will have been severely ill at school etc. but they are few and far between.

    Basically, you're just wrong.
 
 
 
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