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    (Original post by sophisticated)
    This post is fairly irrelevant. You asked about the Physics course at Exeter. Physics is not a "mickey mouse" vocational degree, nor is Exeter an ex-poly. Do a mickey mouse degree if you want. I think finding any graduate job these days is pretty much down to luck anyway.
    Hey sophisticated chill out! :p: There was an invitation for further questions and I merely asked a few questions to gauge whether it was all worth while given the job situation for graduates. We all know that Exeter is not an ex-poly and we all know that physics is not a mickey mouse degree. There are some degrees, for example BSc (Hons) in golf studies, that lead to a job on the fairways.........."Fore!" did I hear you cry? So Exeter is a fantastic uni and rightly deserves it place on the top table of unis.
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    (Original post by Jamjar)
    Hey sophisticated chill out! :p: There was an invitation for further questions and I merely asked a few questions to gauge whether it was all worth while given the job situation for graduates. We all know that Exeter is not an ex-poly and we all know that physics is not a mickey mouse degree. There are some degrees, for example BSc (Hons) in golf studies, that lead to a job on the fairways.........."Fore!" did I hear you cry? So Exeter is a fantastic uni and rightly deserves it place on the top table of unis.
    Obviously you are not guaranteed a job after graduation, with the job market being the way it is now. But you are even less likely to find a job without a degree. The job situation for graduates is pretty dire, but the job situation for non-graduates is arguably even worse. Either way, the University experience is a valuable one. Do a degree if YOU want to do one. None of us can promise that a job is going to fall into your lap straight after....it probably won't, so if thats what you're looking to do a degree for then don't bother.
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    (Original post by sophisticated)
    Where did I say that it was a golden ticket? A degree is no free pass, but there are alot more opportunities open to you if you have a degree, as opposed to not having one. Surely you can't deny that?
    I'm still not convinced. I have several friends who left school at 16, went into further education (as opposed to higher education) to train as hairdressers, graphic designers, nannies etc at a fraction of the cost of university education and were then able to find work immediately upon finishing (whereas I know people with university degrees who are still in jobs that are not worthy of their qualifications, YEARS after finishing their degrees - now tell me who's better off?). They're simply not in the same situation as degree-holders; people with a solid trade can at least export their talents and training as a freelancer if they do lose their job, whereas many degree-holders do not have the same luxury. I really don't believe that it is "much easier" to find a job just by virtue of having a degree (and, as I demonstrated, even having an extra degree on top, plus plenty of work experience, plus plus plus plus plus...doesn't even seem to help much).

    I think finding any graduate job these days is pretty much down to luck anyway.
    Yep...this is a more sensible thing to say.
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    (Original post by Angelil)
    I'm still not convinced. I have several friends who left school at 16, went into further education (as opposed to higher education) to train as hairdressers, graphic designers, nannies etc at a fraction of the cost of university education and were then able to find work immediately upon finishing (whereas I know people with university degrees who are still in jobs that are not worthy of their qualifications, YEARS after finishing their degrees - now tell me who's better off?). They're simply not in the same situation as degree-holders; people with a solid trade can at least export their talents and training as a freelancer if they do lose their job, whereas many degree-holders do not have the same luxury. I really don't believe that it is "much easier" to find a job just by virtue of having a degree (and, as I demonstrated, even having an extra degree on top, plus plenty of work experience, plus plus plus plus plus...doesn't even seem to help much).


    Yep...this is a more sensible thing to say.
    So your advice to the OP would be to not bother doing a degree, but to learn a "trade" instead?
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    Depends on the person - but I don't think it's a bad route to take. I'm truly useless at anything whose skills could relate to any sort of trade, but I think that it's definitely an option that people should consider if they have the skills.
    I may have even been better off doing an NCTJ - these only take a year at most, so I tend to think that journalism 'degrees' are a con too when it's really the NCTJ that professional editors want to see (especially considering how much more a three-year degree costs in comparison).

    It should be noted, too, that my comments are not especially intended as a commentary on Exeter/its reputation/its quality - they are certainly to be taken as more general comments.
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    (Original post by Jamjar)
    I have a few more questions. So now you've finish, any regrets bout your choice of uni and course? With the benefit of hindsight do you think you made mistakes along the way? Given the poor prospects for graduates in finding a good job, do you think physics has help you, and if so then why?
    Sorry to have left it late answering your question. So far I'm finding it difficult getting onto a graduate scheme, I have to confess. With hindsight I may have picked a more vocational course like Engineering or Economics, although my reason for doing the subject was because I had/have a passion for it, and didn't aim for anything truly specific after. I could have worked harder and gone for the 2:1, but most people with 2:2's will say the same thing! There are a million and one other possible routes at all stages in life, but there's little point mulling over the possibilities.
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    (Original post by Krell)
    Sorry to have left it late answering your question. So far I'm finding it difficult getting onto a graduate scheme, I have to confess. With hindsight I may have picked a more vocational course like Engineering or Economics, although my reason for doing the subject was because I had/have a passion for it, and didn't aim for anything truly specific after. I could have worked harder and gone for the 2:1, but most people with 2:2's will say the same thing! There are a million and one other possible routes at all stages in life, but there's little point mulling over the possibilities.
    Sorry to learn of your job hunting difficulties. Are you seeking advice from the uni careers service? Are you thinking about a postgraduate qualification?
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    (Original post by sophisticated)
    So your advice to the OP would be to not bother doing a degree, but to learn a "trade" instead?
    (using your quote as a launching pad for my mini rant rather than specifically at you )

    I would have been much better learning a trade. I think that at college you are shuffled towards uni without ever pausing to think about where it will take you. Obviously a degree is needed for graduate schemes and so on but especially for something like English lit, I've never felt so useless. With a skill, it's tailored towards specific career options and the ability to freelance/become self employed gives you much more flexibility than learning how to stock rotate on a management level.

    I also think that there are many examples of jobs that require a degree that don't actually need one. My manager at Boots doesn't have a degree yet I've applied for the retail management scheme at Boots and need a 2:1. Surely experience rather than a degree would be more useful for a job like this.

    And for my main gripe, English lit is such a pointless degree career wise. The only thing it shows for careers not related to teaching or journalism is that I've actually been to uni and got a piece of paper. I'm finding it so hard to put effort into learning things, as what I'm required to know now, come June, I'll never need to know again.

    So yes, in hindsight I would rather be a hairdresser.
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    (Original post by Xristina)
    Is it true that Rowling studied there ?
    How was it being at the same place she had been once ??

    Every time I take a book out of the library that was taken out in the late 80s I imagine that it was her *sad* :p: (I do the same course)
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    (Original post by romeos*****)
    (using your quote as a launching pad for my mini rant rather than specifically at you )

    I would have been much better learning a trade. I think that at college you are shuffled towards uni without ever pausing to think about where it will take you. Obviously a degree is needed for graduate schemes and so on but especially for something like English lit, I've never felt so useless. With a skill, it's tailored towards specific career options and the ability to freelance/become self employed gives you much more flexibility than learning how to stock rotate on a management level.

    I also think that there are many examples of jobs that require a degree that don't actually need one. My manager at Boots doesn't have a degree yet I've applied for the retail management scheme at Boots and need a 2:1. Surely experience rather than a degree would be more useful for a job like this.

    And for my main gripe, English lit is such a pointless degree career wise. The only thing it shows for careers not related to teaching or journalism is that I've actually been to uni and got a piece of paper. I'm finding it so hard to put effort into learning things, as what I'm required to know now, come June, I'll never need to know again.

    So yes, in hindsight I would rather be a hairdresser.
    Have you ever thought about being a film critic? You don't sound to me to be the managerial type!:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Jamjar)
    Have you ever thought about being a film critic? You don't sound to me to be the managerial type!:rolleyes:
    What is the managerial type?
    I do watch enough films to be a film critic to be fair.
 
 
 
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