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    Very interested in particular in graduates from 2-3 years ago. Just wondering where your degree has taken you and if you have got into employment which without your degree you wouldn't have been able to.


    Just interested as my brother has many friends with degrees who have been stuck with no prospect admin jobs due to the high number of graduates, and others who told him about hopw their degree gives them so many transferable skills for employment, but now they have realised these aren't really that valued anymore.

    Thanks for reading, any input is appreciated.
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    I can only think of users on here that have gone on to MSc/PhD or the d.clin.psych. There arn't really many in-work Psych grads that post on here, if any.
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    Well I graduated last year and I'm on a research PhD, so I don't think you could really call me a typical graduate. My friends have mostly used their degree to go onto posgraduate courses, some linked to psychology (educational psych or mental health nursing), others went to somewhat different areas (management or diplomacy). Of those who went straight into "real jobs" there's one who's gone into social work, one who went to work for a bank and one who's workign behind a bar (seemingly just to piss off her parents). With the excpetion of the barmaid, none of them could have got to where they are without their good psych degree.

    Seeing as there is a recession on at the moment though, its probably not the best time to ask. People I knew from loads of different courses and universities are having trouble getting jobs right now.
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    I graduated in '97 from a red brick university, and enjoyed a career as a research psychologist researching at a university, then subsequently as a clinical psychologist in the NHS. My best friends from my undergraduate course are a counselling psychologist working privately and another is a medical writer working for a company that publishes research/ information articles in magazines. Lots of my year went onto working in health related fields such as nursing, medical research and social work. Some are running their own businesses and working in entirely different areas.

    From my observations 12 years down the line, psychology undergrad seemed to comprise of two groups: the "highly motivated ones" (who were doing psychology for a reason and had a plan) and the "clueless ones" (who did psychology because it sounded funky, but had no remote idea what comes afterwards). The former group invariably did better as they went onto do postgraduate courses or had relevant experience before they graduated which made them very attractive to employers. The latter ones often drifted and were aimless, finding it hard to get a break in whatever area they decided because they didn't lay the foundations. Psychology can be quite cruel like that, although some had lucky breaks.
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    (Original post by Mitothy)
    Well I graduated last year and I'm on a research PhD, so I don't think you could really call me a typical graduate. My friends have mostly used their degree to go onto posgraduate courses, some linked to psychology (educational psych or mental health nursing), others went to somewhat different areas (management or diplomacy). Of those who went straight into "real jobs" there's one who's gone into social work, one who went to work for a bank and one who's workign behind a bar (seemingly just to piss off her parents). With the excpetion of the barmaid, none of them could have got to where they are without their good psych degree.

    Seeing as there is a recession on at the moment though, its probably not the best time to ask. People I knew from loads of different courses and universities are having trouble getting jobs right now.
    Research PhD at Nottingham.... Don't suppose you were the guy who did the talks at the Notts open day (or at least one of them)? Did PCN?
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    (Original post by Meliae)
    Research PhD at Nottingham.... Don't suppose you were the guy who did the talks at the Notts open day (or at least one of them)? Did PCN?
    He he, yeah that was me, sorry you had to listen to me witter on. I was getting paid so it wasn't too painful for me.

    Hope we made some kind of positive impression!
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    (Original post by Mitothy)
    He he, yeah that was me, sorry you had to listen to me witter on. I was getting paid so it wasn't too painful for me.

    Hope we made some kind of positive impression!
    Yeah it was good actually, most useful bit of the talk. You convinced me to apply for PCN at Nottingham (and told me it was called that, saves typing out the full title).

    Oh actually, while you're here, there was something I was wondering about that course... I realise the modules will probably have changed by the time I get to 3rd year and perhaps my interests will have too, but this module, Mind and Brain, is exactly what I want to study. It isn't on the list of PCN modules (not sure if that's complete anyway) but the linked page includes PCN students on the list of target students. Does that mean they can definitely take that module? Come to think of it, if you do that course, do you have to choose all your modules from a restricted list of neuroscience based ones or can you choose some more general ones?
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    What's PCN?
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    What's PCN?
    Psychology with Cognitive Neuroscience, course at Nottingham. Saves typing out the full name everytime. I looked completely blank when he called it that on the open day. Must have been a slow day. :o:
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    (Original post by Meliae)
    Psychology with Cognitive Neuroscience, course at Nottingham. Saves typing out the full name everytime. I looked completely blank when he called it that on the open day. Must have been a slow day. :o:
    Ah of course. I applied to that course back in the UCAS days.
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    (Original post by Meliae)
    Oh actually, while you're here, there was something I was wondering about that course... I realise the modules will probably have changed by the time I get to 3rd year and perhaps my interests will have too, but this module, Mind and Brain, is exactly what I want to study. It isn't on the list of PCN modules (not sure if that's complete anyway) but the linked page includes PCN students on the list of target students. Does that mean they can definitely take that module? Come to think of it, if you do that course, do you have to choose all your modules from a restricted list of neuroscience based ones or can you choose some more general ones?

    Yes you can certainly do Mind and Brain, I did myself and found it really interesting, also its one I'm pretty sure will still be running by the time you get to 3rd year. You have to choose a minimum number of credits from the neuroscience modules (I think it's 50) but the others you can take from whatever you want, so you could do practically all neurosciency stuff or mix and match with the general modules.

    Glad I made a good impression and helped to convince you to apply. I hope you get in and I'm sure you'll enjoy it, everyone from my year certainly did!
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    (Original post by Mitothy)
    Yes you can certainly do Mind and Brain, I did myself and found it really interesting, also its one I'm pretty sure will still be running by the time you get to 3rd year. You have to choose a minimum number of credits from the neuroscience modules (I think it's 50) but the others you can take from whatever you want, so you could do practically all neurosciency stuff or mix and match with the general modules.

    Glad I made a good impression and helped to convince you to apply. I hope you get in and I'm sure you'll enjoy it, everyone from my year certainly did!
    Ah that's good and thanks. Before I visited I was going to apply to either Notts or UCL for my 5th choice (but the cost of living in London is a big disadvantage). Now I'm definitely applying to Notts (well unless something very bad happens between now and Octoberish time) though it isn't currently my 1st choice. I'd be happy to go to any of them to be honest. I don't know how I'll pick if I get the offers.

    Out of curiosity, what's your PhD in? Straight psychology or something else?
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    I graduated in 2004.
    Most of the people on my current course have psychology degrees.
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    (Original post by Meliae)
    Out of curiosity, what's your PhD in? Straight psychology or something else?
    Its a bit of an odd one to be honest. Its in decision theory; economic psychology. More specifically the effects of memory phenomena on how we put a value of money or usefulness on items and opportunities.

    Lets be honest it doesn't sound fancy and exciting, but I find it interesting. Most people just don't like it because it has a lot of maths.
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    (Original post by Mitothy)
    Its a bit of an odd one to be honest. Its in decision theory; economic psychology. More specifically the effects of memory phenomena on how we put a value of money or usefulness on items and opportunities.

    Lets be honest it doesn't sound fancy and exciting, but I find it interesting. Most people just don't like it because it has a lot of maths.
    Ah, given your undergrad I was expecting it to be something neurosciency. I haven't really looked at economic psychology before. Enjoy.
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    Just graduated and am now going to Drama School. Yes a bit of a career change, but shows other professions aren't put off by Psych degrees!
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    Is there any hope for undergraduates such as myself who don't want to pursue the medical/NHS route? (Don't fancy studying for 6 years to acheive charter status, and the amount of debt that that would accumulate...) i'm looking to go down the businuss/marketing/advertising/human resources route instead, possibly looking to do an advanced certificate in Public Relations after my Psych degree (it's only 1 extra year). Just wondering if anyone has experience of doing this/anyone they know going down this path rather than the NHS route. Thanks.
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    (Original post by NiceWeatherForAirstrikes)
    Is there any hope for undergraduates such as myself who don't want to pursue the medical/NHS route? (Don't fancy studying for 6 years to acheive charter status, and the amount of debt that that would accumulate...).
    The 3 year clinical doctorate pays a £22k salary for each year of study! No tuition fees.


    But yeah I can't help you, im afraid.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    The 3 year clinical doctorate pays a £22k salary for each year of study! No tuition fees.


    But yeah I can't help you, im afraid.
    It's not the tuition fees so much, rather the accomodation. I'd theoretically have to stay somewhere for the extra 3 years unless the doctorate centre was near my hometown, which i sincerely doubt.
    Oh, well thanks anyway! I can't be the only one...
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    (Original post by NiceWeatherForAirstrikes)
    Is there any hope for undergraduates such as myself who don't want to pursue the medical/NHS route? (Don't fancy studying for 6 years to acheive charter status, and the amount of debt that that would accumulate...) i'm looking to go down the businuss/marketing/advertising/human resources route instead, possibly looking to do an advanced certificate in Public Relations after my Psych degree (it's only 1 extra year).
    With a decent psych degree you can pretty much go straight into any of those career areas straight after undergrad, granted not straight to the top, but that's true of anything, it takes a few years of work experience. I know of one person who's gone onto a Masters in (I think) Management and Diplomacy, they got on straight away with a psych 2.1 from a decent uni.

    There is certainly hope if you don't go onto medical stuff or DClin, hardly any psych graduates do, they are just the most talked about routes because they are the most competitive.
 
 
 
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