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    Right i know obviously that at A-level standard the subjects get substantially harder than at GCSE. I was just curious how do they get harder? For example English? do they just read harder books or go into things in more detail?
    I'm thinking of taking these A-levels
    History
    Religious studies
    Maths
    English
    Economics

    Are those considered good subjects to take?
    and what are the advantages and disadvantages in these subjects?
    which are the hardest and whyy?
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    They all seem good subjects. What university course are you thinking of?
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    law
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    I would say Maths increases the most in terms of hardness (?) because GCSE maths is balls. But if your naturally good at Maths you'll won't find it that much at a problem. I however, needed to put in more effort, and do work thoughout the year instead of just before exams (my other subjects)

    Economics isn't that hard. It's just the technique in which you write your answers. You have to evaluate every blessed thing. Its weird because you can understand how everything works but you still can't get top marks in exams just because of exam technique. That was my problem anyway. For example I would rape the multiple choice questions because they were based on facts, but struggle with the essay ones (30 marks now) for Edexcel.

    English was the easiest for me. That would probably be because we had a good teacher though. Well I did literature anyway, did a ******** of notes and revision a month before exams. During the term though, I made sure I was always familiar with my texts and quotes. Are you doing literature or language? And the books, do get marginally harder, but not that hard. They still have definite themes which you can analyse. But A level allows you to go into more depth.
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    I do History, RS and English Lit. Is it Lit or Lang or Lit/Lang you're talking about? I'd recommend Lit over the others.

    In terms of difficulty I've found History and English Lit to be similar to GCSE. The structure of essays in History and types of questions asked is different, but not too hard.

    With RS I haven't found it particularly hard but bear in mind it's very different to GCSE. GCSE RS is often a bit of a doss, A-level definitely isn't a doss. Depends on what papers you're doing but it involves concepts you need to be able to understand.

    For Law, you've chosen an excellent range of subjects I think, however, are you sure you can cope with the workload of 5? If you were going to just do 4, I'd recommend History, English Lit as definites, and then preferably RS and either Maths or Economics.
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    Maths is the hardest.
    A level introduces lots of new techniques and formula.
    As is easy, A2 is like :zomg:
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    I do maths and history (did my ASs this year).

    Maths isn't too hard IMO; sometimes you will have to put in a bit of effort to understand a concept, but with lots of past papers, it isn't too bad, and the workload wasn't too heavy.

    History, in my experience, required a LOT of effort, both in terms of notemaking and learning. However, I tended to do OK in tests once I had put the effort in.
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    Are you sure you want to do 5 A-Levels? The workload will be hard to manage. I'd recommend dropping either Maths or Economics, but for law you have to keep English and History.
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    (Original post by amii_G)
    Are you sure you want to do 5 A-Levels? The workload will be hard to manage. I'd recommend dropping either Maths or Economics, but for law you have to keep English and History.
    Well you don't HAVE to do English and History, but yes, they are perhaps the most useful.

    However, if the OP feels they can cope with 5 subjects, they should do 5 subjects; one could be dropped a few weeks in if necesary.
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    RS is a lot more work but not that much more difficult.

    English I found the level to be about the same but it turns into a love it/hate it subject. It's lots more interesting though
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    Ahh!
    thanks for all the advice!
    I'm thinking of doing english lit.
    im not doing five for definate, just like those are the five that i like, i'd probably drop maths in the frist year, or before if i couldn't handle it.
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    Sounds like a good plan - they're really good subjects for law, showing a nice range and they're all pretty much well respected subjects. History and English Lit should definitely be taken; if you're less confident with maths don't feel bad about dropping it, but it does show a nice contrast from your other subjects.
    I do History, English Lit and Maths from those subjects - I'd say Maths increased in terms of difficulty the most, but increases even more at A2, from the little A2 work I've started. But it really isn't hard as long as you turn up to lessons and make sure you keep on top of each topic - if you don't understand just keep going over it, because each module is essential for the next. As for English Lit, I suppose it gets harder in terms of the analysis and language they are expecting from you - but in terms of books and drama, they don't get much more difficult - the difference is almost certainly in your responses, which if you have a good teacher, won't be too difficult to grasp. History content-wise honestly doesn't get more complicated than GCSE - perhaps you may need a little more detailed knowledge, but nothing unexpected - the change comes in the structure of essays you'll need to write - but with practice (and if you're generally quite good at essays) you won't find it a problem. I suppose the difference with the written subjects particularly is that you may feel the need to read around the subject a little more, particularly with History, in order to really achieve the highest of marks (although this isn't always required, and many do really well without it) and I guess it is this extra background and wider reading that adds to the pressures of A-Levels.
    As for doing five, I've not found it a problem - and if you're doing it because you're interested in all the subjects and want the challenge, then go for it and enjoy it, but honestly, it won't make a uni application less strong if you only have four subjects, especially if this allows you to achieve higher grades
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    Well you don't HAVE to do English and History, but yes, they are perhaps the most useful.

    However, if the OP feels they can cope with 5 subjects, they should do 5 subjects; one could be dropped a few weeks in if necesary.
    Really? LSE and Oxford lied to me. 'Tis a shame.
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    Maths is quite hard, well it was for me anyway. Its a lot harder than GCSE. But you are good at maths then you wont find it a problem though. I havent done any of the other subjects though so i cant comment on them.
    They sound like good subjects to take if you are doing law at uni.
    5 subjects does seem like a lot but thats your choice. You can always drop one after a few weeks if it is too much.
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    Maths is hard at A-level more because GCSE is really quite easy more than anything else.
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    English Literature or Language? Overall a good choice of options Now you just need to get the grades:tongue:
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    The hardest thing about English Lit that I found this year, was that my teacher was an unbelivably strict marker anyway, and therefore that I had to stick exactly to the mark scheme in order to get good marks. If you can get to grips with the change between writing at GCSE, and writing to an A-Level standard, then the rest of the course is easy enough, and not that much different to GCSE (Although, that said, I had an awful teacher at GCSE who didn't even open the set texts to study them with us... so it was harder in that respect, but assuming you were actually taught at GCSE, it's not that different).

    I don't know about the others though, sorry.
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    I found English Lit and History hard to get to grips with in Year 12. Began to understand when the workload/difficulty was upped for A2 though.

    I was swamped with English Lit work, for both years, as our teacher was a real slave-driver (2 hours a night, was normal). History, I initially messed up at AS, but in reflection; it's not that hard if you know the faces and structure the essays right. Analysing texts for English, I found really difficult initially. Most people I know who struggled with their A Levels, did so in the Sciences, Maths and Economics. They're a real leap up from GCSE and the technical detail is incredible.

    5 A Levels aren't necessary, unless you're trying for Oxbridge. Even then, they don't show preference for it! I took 4 AS (including GS) and the same for A2. That load was enough. Don't make things harder for yourself! You'll realise this when the work comes pouring in around November time!
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    (Original post by amii_G)
    Really? LSE and Oxford lied to me. 'Tis a shame.
    Oxford website:

    "Candidates are also expected to have at least a C grade in GCSE mathematics, or other evidence to demonstrate that they are appropriately numerate. Apart from this, the choice of subjects is up to you. There is no particular advantage or disadvantage to studying Law before you apply." http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/under...nce/law_1.html


    You certainly don't need to do English and/or History.
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    Natural progression, inital shock.
 
 
 

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