Turn on thread page Beta

Difficulty of A-levels???? watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Chunkycrayons)
    Right i know obviously that at A-level standard the subjects get substantially harder than at GCSE. I was just curious how do they get harder? For example English? do they just read harder books or go into things in more detail?
    I'm thinking of taking these A-levels
    History
    Religious studies
    Maths
    English
    Economics

    Are those considered good subjects to take?
    and what are the advantages and disadvantages in these subjects?
    which are the hardest and whyy?


    well for me history would be one of the harder ones because you need to remember dates and everything thats already happened, whereas which maths you just need to learn how to work things out and once you know how to work everything out you would be flying (personal opinion, everybodys different)
    my friend done a-level english 2 years ago for all of a month, he couldnt hack it, said there was far too much work and all he done was write pointless essays whcih he didnt like, would have prefered to work on coursework!

    i want to start a levels in sept but am also stuck on which to do, i think its good to combine subjects like r.e and english or history and english. maths and economics go quite well together too. it helps if you know what you want to do after a-level, if its just a job then english and math will be usefull along with something you enjoy or in the field you want to work in... but if you want to go to uni, check out the courses you are interested in on ucas.com and check their requirements, in the last two yrs ive studied a BTEC travel n tourism, i saw a business course at a uni i was interested in but said you needed business studies and math both at high grades....

    its all about knowing what you want to do in the future but thats where i am stuck... i dont want to do the same thing for all of my life like a teacher or doctor or shop owner! i want to be several different things meaning i would work in the field for a few years then move on to the next thing!! i spoke to my lecturer about that and he thought i was daft, as i would be spending the next 8-10 yrs in tech studing all the diff courses...

    your lucky if you know what you want to do id say
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Maths or Economics would be the hardest in terms of concepts, in terms of actual learning workload I'd say History.

    Your subjects seem to be fine for Law though, if you could I'd recommend picking up Physics or Chemistry and dropping Religious studies although 5 AS's is a pretty big workload but if you take Physics and the Mechanics option for Maths then it'll be quite a bit less.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by Chunkycrayons)
    Right i know obviously that at A-level standard the subjects get substantially harder than at GCSE. I was just curious how do they get harder? For example English? do they just read harder books or go into things in more detail?
    I'm thinking of taking these A-levels
    History
    Religious studies
    Maths
    English
    Economics

    Are those considered good subjects to take?
    and what are the advantages and disadvantages in these subjects?
    which are the hardest and whyy?
    A-Levels are harder than GCSEs in the content covered, and also in the style of the actual exam (in that they require you to think more and also the level you're being examined at is a higher level). That said, providing you put in the work necessary and do all the revision and past papers you can, you will be fine.

    The subjects you've provisionally chosen are well-respected and considered very good to take. You've an arts focus with some diversity in the case of Maths, which will put you in good stead with universities for law courses. If anything, I'd drop one of your arts subjects as opposed to Maths since keeping Maths would give you more of a rounded application and universities do like some contrast within subject choices.

    The advantages of those subjects, mainly with respect to taking law at university, is that they're essay-based and so will prepare you well in that respect. Additionally, they are analytical and critical-thinking subjects, which force you to properly think about a situation and assess and evaluate, which is very much useful in law. As I've already said, the contrast with Maths will boost your application since it'll give you an all-rounded feeling.

    As for the hardest, it depends on you to be honest. Each person is different and just because I or someone else find one subject the hardest of those doesn't necessarily mean you will.

    Hope this helps.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    great subjects to be taking to study law I think

    shows you're really well rounded!

    A levels are harder as others have touched upon but if you put the hard work in you'll honestly be fine(provided you're decently competent at least)
    Offline

    14
    (Original post by Chunkycrayons)
    Right i know obviously that at A-level standard the subjects get substantially harder than at GCSE. I was just curious how do they get harder? For example English? do they just read harder books or go into things in more detail?
    I'm thinking of taking these A-levels
    History
    Religious studies
    Maths
    English
    Economics

    Are those considered good subjects to take?
    and what are the advantages and disadvantages in these subjects?
    which are the hardest and whyy?
    I did Maths and Economics at A Level so I can tell you about those

    Maths is a very good subject to take, and it's also very different to GCSEs. There's a lot more material at A Level in Maths, you also learn a lot of new formualas and new ways to do Maths. The exams are themselves different to GCSEs too in that you're doing sums rather than writing worded answers down to strange questions as you might in your GCSEs.

    I think Economics is a respected subject too, it definitely has a broad structure and I found it very interesting at A Level. Economics does need good exam technique but once you get a good exam technique it will stand you in good stead for getting good marks in your A Levels.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    well i did 5 a-levels and it was hard to cope with but i wanted to persevere. i took Food Techonology (sounds like a doss but seriously its like biochemistry - especially the exams), Psychology, Biology, Textiles and General Studies (a total doss. but its still an a-level! haha we were forced into it!) so throughout the spring i had 6 pieces of coursework all going at the same time! 4 practical ones and 2 written. it was a nightmare! but im so glad i worked really hard throught it all! it really impressed my unis. so i hope it pays off.

    i dont know much about your subjects apart from my friends constantly moning about how hard history, maths, and english lit were!

    a-levels are a complete and utter nightmare. end of!

    its a shock at first to how hard some of the courses are... but in the end you adjust!
 
 
 
Poll
Cats or dogs?
Help with your A-levels

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Rosette

Essay expert

Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

Uni match

Uni match

Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

Study planner

Create a study plan

Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

Study planner

Resources by subject

Everything from mind maps to class notes.

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student doing homework

Study tips from A* students

Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

Study help links and info

Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.