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Is there a difference between 'despite' and 'in spite of'? Watch

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    I think there's a subtle difference, though I can't quite place it.

    Thoughts?
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    According to dictionary.com they're synoymns of each other.

    In any case, I would say go for the former as it's not wordy and it's consise.

    However, I do get what you mean. :yep:
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    (Original post by im so academic)
    According to dictionary.com they're synoymns of each other.

    In any case, I would say go for the former as it's not wordy and it's consise.

    However, I do get what you mean. :yep:
    Thanks .
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    They mean exactly the same thing to me, and if the dictionary agrees, then I'd say they are synonymous.

    Most people would just say 'despite' and maybe use 'in spite of' in a formal letter or essay.
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    To me, "despite" means the willingness to look past an issue. Whereas "in spite of..." means that although the issue has been addressed and is/was clearly present, the person is willing to make one final push at a positive outcome.
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    (Original post by reems23)
    Thanks .
    It's ok!


    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    They mean exactly the same thing to me, and if the dictionary agrees, then I'd say they are synonymous.

    Most people would just say 'despite' and maybe use 'in spite of' in a formal letter or essay.
    Definitel wrong when using in an essay, and I think it applies to letters etc as well.

    From my essay book it says that you should replace words with more consise meanings, i.e. why state something in five words when it can be done in one?

    E.g.:

    Instead of:

    all of a sudden, use suddenly
    along the lines of, use like
    at the present time, use currently
    in the event that, use if
    etc

    So I think the same principle applies. As said before, for essays etc, use "despite" instead of "in spite of". :yes:

    Hope it makes sense!
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    I'd say "despite" is looking over an issue whilst "in spit of" is actively discarding it.
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    one has three syllables, the other has two...
 
 
 
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