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    (Original post by Nicholas Urfe)
    Cool! :yes: So you're taking the Medieval/Renaissance route? Where do your particular interests lie? I'm just doing general 'Literary Studies', because my interests are too broad at present. And I'm horribly indecisive. In fact, I even changed one of my module choices yesterday.
    One reason that I decided upon the Medieval/Renaissance route is because I'm fascinated by the Middle Ages and the Renaissance and need an excuse to study literature from that period. I really haven't narrowed down my interests further than that--although I will admit that I am interested in how often birds appear in medieval writings and may write my MA dissertation on something along those lines.

    My main motivation for selecting a formal pathway was the MA dissertation. Like you, I am interested in the whole of English literature (I'd like to study it all!) and decided that committing to a formal pathway would help me to more quickly hone in on a subject for the dissertation, since my subject matter will be confined to Medieval/Renaissance lit. We'll see how good my logic is when I have to begin writing.:rolleyes:
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    Thanks for the welcomes!

    I'm on the human side of geography (sorry Epoch!). As such, I suspect my work has more in common with Rachel15 and "delinquents" than with geology (though I, of course, have a fair number of friends on the physical side as well--one of the benefits of working in an interdisciplinary department!). The only disadvantage is that I don;t get much chance to drop the term "plate tectonics" into casual conversation (ivesives).

    I look forward to meeting all of you. We'll have to organize a beer session early in the term.
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    (Original post by Canuckle)
    Thanks for the welcomes!

    I'm on the human side of geography (sorry Epoch!). As such, I suspect my work has more in common with Rachel15 and "delinquents" than with geology (though I, of course, have a fair number of friends on the physical side as well--one of the benefits of working in an interdisciplinary department!). The only disadvantage is that I don;t get much chance to drop the term "plate tectonics" into casual conversation (ivesives).

    I look forward to meeting all of you. We'll have to organize a beer session early in the term.
    Out of interest (I'm a postgrad with a degree from Durham, but I'm not a Durham postgrad and am sneaking onto this thread) what area of human geog and who's your supervisor?
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    (Original post by arkbar)
    Out of interest (I'm a postgrad with a degree from Durham, but I'm not a Durham postgrad and am sneaking onto this thread) what area of human geog and who's your supervisor?
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    (Original post by Canuckle)
    Thanks for the welcomes!

    I'm on the human side of geography (sorry Epoch!). As such, I suspect my work has more in common with Rachel15 and "delinquents" than with geology (though I, of course, have a fair number of friends on the physical side as well--one of the benefits of working in an interdisciplinary department!). The only disadvantage is that I don;t get much chance to drop the term "plate tectonics" into casual conversation (ivesives).

    I look forward to meeting all of you. We'll have to organize a beer session early in the term.
    To be honest I don't get to use the term plate tectonics alot and I do Geology. However the TSR geographers out there have some very old information on how plates move! That said human geography is something that I would not have a clue about...
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    (Original post by epoch)
    To be honest I don't get to use the term plate tectonics alot and I do Geology.
    I take it you're not a structural geologist, then? What branch of geology are you into?

    (Original post by epoch)
    That said human geography is something that I would not have a clue about...
    I'll be happy to chat about it over welcome week celebrations. Essentially, you can study anything that happens in an abstract, material, or imaginary space (yes, that means everything).
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    (Original post by Canuckle)
    I take it you're not a structural geologist, then? What branch of geology are you into?
    My PhD involves study in Volcanology, Petrology and Sedimentary geology however my undergraduate project focused on structural geology which I plan to integrate into the project somehow.

    (Original post by Canuckle)
    I'll be happy to chat about it over welcome week celebrations. Essentially, you can study anything that happens in an abstract, material, or imaginary space (yes, that means everything).
    Indeed. So what do you plan to focus on?

    edit for formatting error
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    (Original post by epoch)
    My PhD involves study in Volcanology, Petrology and Sedimentary geology however my undergraduate project focused on structural geology which I plan to integrate into the project somehow.



    Indeed. So what do you plan to focus on?

    edit for formatting error
    sounds like you'll have your hands full! I look forward to learning more about it.

    I look at issues mainly around public space, marginalization, and citizenship. A bit different than my physical geography friends, but there is surprising space for overlap.
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    I had to make the decision over the weekend to defer for a year, I was expecting an inheritance which was going to go towards most of my costs, apparently I won't be getting it until April so it means I won't have all of the cash I'll need at the beginning of the academic year. It sucks, but it looks like it's going to be October 2010 for me
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    As, that must feel a bit rubbish now, but it could be a fantastic opportunity to do something a bit different for a year that you would never have done after your masters.
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    (Original post by Sooz)
    As, that must feel a bit rubbish now, but it could be a fantastic opportunity to do something a bit different for a year that you would never have done after your masters.
    Yeah, i suppose, i have thought about maybe getting a working visa for the states and going over there for a few months but i haven't really looked into it, i seem to remember that it is easier to get a one year working visa if one has a confirmed place at uni, (basically something to show there is a commitment to something in the UK and a reason to return home). But i could be wrong and i'm not sure about the other conditions. I think i might just be better off getting a job that pays well and saving every last penny. The job i'm in at the mo ends in September which would have been great for starting uni in oct. I've already started looking for something else but there doesn't seem to be a lot around and a lot of interest in only a few jobs. Some companies might not want to take on someone who will only be there for a year, i suppose i don't need to tell them i plan on going back to uni,
 
 
 
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