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    If you have been in counselling or seen a psychologist can you ever become a counsellor or psychologist yourself?

    I have heard that if you have seen one before the age of 21 you cane never become one. Is this true?
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    Simply, no.
    As long as your fit to practice at the time you embark on your Diploma its fine. First you need an undergraduate degree. You would have to disclose it later on when faced with occupational health checks, but as long as your fit for practice then, im 99.9% sure it wouldnt be an issue.
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    To become a counsellor you have to actually receive counselling sessions yourself as part of the process so no it's perfectly fine.
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    Many people who go into caring/helping professions do it because they have faced issues of their own.
    As long as you are fit to undertake training and will not pose a risk to anyone, you will be able to do it.
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    I don't think its true, providing you are fit to practice.

    If you're serious about becoming a Psych, I can give you more info if you like.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I don't think its true, providing you are fit to practice.

    If you're serious about becoming a Psych, I can give you more info if you like.
    Yes please that would be great :-)
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    (Original post by blondyx)
    Yes please that would be great :-)
    http://www.bps.org.uk/careers/what-d...areas_home.cfm

    This is your best place to start. The British Psychological Society is proffessional body for Psych careers. This link breaks down all the different areas and includes the qualifications required to enter them.

    The most popular is Clinical Psychology, which essentially requires a 3 year BSc in Psychology and a 3 year Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, which provides a salary of around £22k during each year of training. Although unfortunately, as Psych has exploded with undergraduates, there is a massive bottleneck to enter all of the postgraduate training courses. As a result, it usually takes a few years of graduate experience before you gain a place.

    Typical graduate work experience would include Assistant Psychologist posts which are pretty much gold dust with hundreds of applicants per place. Other jobs include IAPT therapists and what not. It's a tough process with a lot of competition.

    The first port of call is A-levels to gain a place on a BSc. This isn't particularly hard, as entry requirements range from CCC-AAA depending on the university. From there, you can gain loads of voluntary experience from websites such as DirectGov and www.do-it.org. It's incredibly important to get ahead while you can.

    Hope that helped. Certainly have a read of the BPS site and all the different areas of Psychology.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    http://www.bps.org.uk/careers/what-d...areas_home.cfm

    This is your best place to start. The British Psychological Society is proffessional body for Psych careers. This link breaks down all the different areas and includes the qualifications required to enter them.

    The most popular is Clinical Psychology, which essentially requires a 3 year BSc in Psychology and a 3 year Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, which provides a salary of around £22k during each year of training. Although unfortunately, as Psych has exploded with undergraduates, there is a massive bottleneck to enter all of the postgraduate training courses. As a result, it usually takes a few years of graduate experience before you gain a place.

    Typical graduate work experience would include Assistant Psychologist posts which are pretty much gold dust with hundreds of applicants per place. Other jobs include IAPT therapists and what not. It's a tough process with a lot of competition.

    The first port of call is A-levels to gain a place on a BSc. This isn't particularly hard, as entry requirements range from CCC-AAA depending on the university. From there, you can gain loads of voluntary experience from websites such as DirectGov and www.do-it.org. It's incredibly important to get ahead while you can.

    Hope that helped. Certainly have a read of the BPS site and all the different areas of Psychology.
    Thanks for the info. I have just finished my first year at uni doing psych. I would quite like to be a psychologist but i heard they are trying to cut them down and get more counsellors instead because like 3 counsellors = 1 psychologist (salary wise).
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    (Original post by blondyx)
    Thanks for the info. I have just finished my first year at uni doing psych. I would quite like to be a psychologist but i heard they are trying to cut them down and get more counsellors instead because like 3 counsellors = 1 psychologist (salary wise).
    Well, they are training more CBT counsellors and are pushing Clinical Psychologists into more.. supervisional roles.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Well, they are training more CBT counsellors and are pushing Clinical Psychologists into more.. supervisional roles.
    What do you want to do after your uni coursE?
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    (Original post by blondyx)
    What do you want to do after your uni coursE?
    I want to go into graduate medicine.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I want to go into graduate medicine.
    Erm, sorry for stealing the show a bit, but would you know anything about forensic psychology? Also, you can do medicine with a Bsc in psyc? :lolwut:

    and @ the op, I was in the exact same position, but I actually talked to my couneslor and she said that it would be fine
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    (Original post by LuhLah)
    Erm, sorry for stealing the show a bit, but would you know anything about forensic psychology? Also, you can do medicine with a Bsc in psyc? :lolwut:

    and @ the op, I was in the exact same position, but I actually talked to my couneslor and she said that it would be fine
    Forensic Psychology? Well, the BPS describes a Forensic Psych as:

    Forensic psychology is devoted to psychological aspects of legal processes in courts. The term is also often used to refer to investigative and criminological psychology: applying psychological theory to criminal investigation, understanding psychological problems associated with criminal behaviour, and the treatment of criminals. Key tasks undertaken by forensic psychologists include piloting and implementing treatment programmes; modifying offender behaviour; responding to the changing needs of staff and prisoners; reducing stress for staff and prisoners; providing hard research evidence to support practice; undertaking statistical analysis for prisoner profiling; giving evidence in court; advising parole boards and mental health tribunals; crime analysis.

    The largest single employer of forensic psychologists in the UK is HM Prison Service (which includes the Home Office Research and Development Unit as well as prisons). However, forensic psychologists can also be employed in the health service (including rehabilitation units and secure hospitals), the social service (including the police service, young offenders units, and the probation service), and in university departments or in private consultancy.

    In the treatment of offenders, forensic psychologists are responsible for the development of appropriate programmes for rehabilitation. They may include anger management, social and cognitive skills training, and treatment for drug/and or alcohol addiction. In the support of prison staff, forensic psychologists may be responsible for the delivery of stress management or training on how to cope with understanding bullying, and techniques for hostage negotiation.


    The qualifications required are:
    BSc Psychology: Atleast a 2.1
    MSc Forensic Psychology
    2 Years Supervised Practice

    Keep in mind this is a very popular route, and getting on to the MSc is a pain in the ass apparently.

    Although, I believe a few universities are implementing the 3 year doctorate in forensic psych, meaning the MSc'ers will have to top up their degree. (Atleast I think that was Forensic.)
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    Ugh, bugger that lol
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    (Original post by LuhLah)
    Erm, sorry for stealing the show a bit, but would you know anything about forensic psychology? Also, you can do medicine with a Bsc in psyc? :lolwut:

    and @ the op, I was in the exact same position, but I actually talked to my couneslor and she said that it would be fine
    Really? im surprised. My psychology lecture told us if we went to see a psychologist after the age of 21 we couldn't become one.
    What are you seeing your counsellor about if you don't mind me asking? and where are you studying?
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    You should inform your lecturer that they're wrong and it's worrying they would actually say that.
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    alot of people i know have seen counsellors, psychologists etc. even a couple have been sectioned or an inpatiant and some are becoming psychologists and others planning to do so
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    Thanks everyone
 
 
 
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