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    (Original post by Kolya)
    what is the nature of its rudeness? ...is the rudeness primarily a mostly_arbitrary social construction that requires us to conform (or otherwise risk social stigma), or is it primarily something intrinsic about swearing that means it is socially unacceptable?

    in other words, should we say "swearing is rude" (does it even make sense to say this or that word is intrinsically unacceptable?), or would it be better to say "others think swearing is rude and therefore we should make our children conform"?
    To swear is to be rude. Don't even bother trying to take the word in it's literal sense... that's just dumb...
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Why are children taught not to swear, and why does children swearing cause uncomfortableness? Swearing plays an important part in most adult's vocabulary, so why are children taught not to do it?
    So they don't get warning points on TSR in their future. :yep:
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    (Original post by Donnahh)
    To swear is to be rude. Don't even bother trying to take the word in it's literal sense... that's just dumb...
    Why should we teach children not to be "socially incorrect" (i.e. rude)? If the child is likely to enter a social circle where swearing is socially correct, should we therefore teach them to swear?

    For you to simply say that swearing is "rude" and so should not be taught to children only raises more questions than it answers!
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Why are children taught not to swear, and why does children swearing cause uncomfortableness? Swearing plays an important part in most adult's vocabulary, so why are children taught not to do it?
    Because in an ideal world, no-one really needs to swear. In public, people don't usually swear unless there is a real reason, and people who swear needlessly and endlessly, well... don't leave a nice impression.

    It's good to teach children ideals... they'll find the vices by themsevles!
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Why should we teach children not to be "socially incorrect" (i.e. rude)? If the child is likely to enter a social circle where swearing is socially correct, should we therefore teach them to swear?

    For you to simply say that swearing is "rude" and so should not be taught to children only raises more questions than it answers!
    I wouldnt want my children in that social circle anyway, if you weren't accepted unless you did.

    As I said in another response... teach children ideals, they'll find swearing by themselves.
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    Chickens do not swear silly

    EDIT : sorry, my bad:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by jammythedodger)
    I wouldnt want my children in that social circle anyway, if you weren't accepted unless you did.

    As I said in another response... teach children ideals, they'll find swearing by themselves.
    Agreed, and there is your answer.
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    My high school business teacher used to say swearing restricts your vocabulary, you cannot express your views clearly without using the word '****' in every sentence.

    I don't really give a ****, and don't really believe that, i've met really smart people with top grammer/use of vocabulary who swear, I actually agree with you OP.
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    (Original post by jammythedodger)
    Because in an ideal world, no-one really needs to swear. In public, people don't usually swear unless there is a real reason, and people who swear needlessly and endlessly, well... don't leave a nice impression.
    To quote Stephen Fry on those that say swearing is not necessary: "They say "it's not necessary", as if that should stop one doing it! It's not necessary to have coloured socks, it's not necessary for this cushion to be here, but is anyone going to write in and say 'I was shocked to see that cushion there -- it really wasn't necessary'? No. Things not being necessary are what make life interesting - the little extras in life."

    (Original post by jammythedodger)
    It's good to teach children ideals... they'll find the vices by themsevles!
    You haven't explained why swearing is a vice, though. (Nor is it clear why those who don't think swearing is a vice also often teach their children not to swear.)
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    If it offends other people, it's worth doing. Repeatedly.
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Why are children taught not to swear, and why does children swearing cause uncomfortableness? Swearing plays an important part in most adult's vocabulary, so why are children taught not to do it?
    Well for one reason or another, the swear words are considered rude, and they are often used as insults. So I guess it's considered bad manners, and kids are always taught to use good manners.
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    To quote Stephen Fry on those that say swearing is not necessary: "They say "it's not necessary", as if that should stop one doing it! It's not necessary to have coloured socks, it's not necessary for this cushion to be here, but is anyone going to write in and say 'I was shocked to see that cushion there -- it really wasn't necessary'? No. Things not being necessary are what make life interesting - the little extras in life."

    You haven't explained why swearing is a vice, though. (Nor is it clear why those who don't think swearing is a vice also often teach their children not to swear.)

    That is a great Fry quote.

    I think if I had kids, I wouldn't teach them to swear or not to swear, I doubt I'd refrain from swearing infront of them.


    Out of curiosity, do you have kids? and what would your stance be on whether or not they swear?
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    Swearing is nothing, just words some idiots decided to label as naughty.

    I find it difficult not to swear.
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    The way i think about it, kids dont really know what it means, they just know its rude, and my way of thinking is when their old enough to know what it means then they should be old enough to say it.
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    To quote Stephen Fry on those that say swearing is not necessary: "They say "it's not necessary", as if that should stop one doing it! It's not necessary to have coloured socks, it's not necessary for this cushion to be here, but is anyone going to write in and say 'I was shocked to see that cushion there -- it really wasn't necessary'? No. Things not being necessary are what make life interesting - the little extras in life."

    You haven't explained why swearing is a vice, though. (Nor is it clear why those who don't think swearing is a vice also often teach their children not to swear.)
    To the above Stephen Fry quote, none of those are considered rude. Swearing it, it dictionary description is in itself profane language. They all intruth refer to topics which in most cases you wouldn't discuss in polite society. They're raison d'être is indeed to offend and be rude, and unpolite. That is why they exist - they would probably soon fall into misuse as unneeded words if they were no longer considered profane.

    But nevertheless, they're are considered profane and rude and there to offend. That offence, that profanity, that rudeness is unnecessary. I want my children to be polite, to be considered human beings who don;t just go on and on being rude. I don't want it to just be normal, I want them to realise that there is a time for swearing, and time not to, rather than just do it all the time.
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    Just wondering who sent me neg rep, and why?
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    i've always been allowed to swear in my house and i know for sure that i never swore at school and only a little bit at school now and i am in yr 10. i dont really see why we should have words that are 'bad' anyway.
    how did these swearwords actually become swearwords though? i mean at some point it must of been socially acceptable to say f*** right?
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    You could say it's just words people have decided that are rude.
    But then you could then say that "please" and "thank you" are just words people have decided are polite. Well, people want their children to be polite and they teach them to be that way - in the same way, they teach them not to swear because it's rude.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    Out of curiosity, do you have kids? and what would your stance be on whether or not they swear?
    No, I don't have kids. My stance would be that I don't care either way. It's not really for me to attempt to impose a particular way of using language on them -- it's up to them.
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    what is the nature of its rudeness? ...is the rudeness primarily a mostly_arbitrary social construction that requires us to conform (or otherwise risk social stigma), or is it primarily something intrinsic about swearing that means it is socially unacceptable?

    in other words, should we say "swearing is rude" (does it even make sense to say this or that word is intrinsically unacceptable?), or would it be better to say "others think swearing is rude and therefore we should make our children conform"?
    Well, because most of them refer to sex or bodily functions, which, when used as swear words, have nothing to do with the current topic. Why should children (or anyone, for that matter) bring bodily functions into a conversation about what they did at school or at football club? Also, frequently swearing for no apparent reason is seen as a bad habit, like saying "like", "um" etc. in the middle of a sentence., and most people want to stop their children from developing bad habits that could continue into later life.

    Not everyone is used to casual swearing and plenty of people are intolerant of it. At the age of 19 I wouldn't ever swear in front of my parents, my older relatives, younger children, my lecturers or a random person I didn't know, for fear of disapproval, anger or punishment. None of my friends or family swear much at all in normal everyday conversations, if they did I'd be quite surprised.

    I guess it depends on where you live and what your friends and family are like; if no one you know swears you won't either. Many parents who swear themselves understand that not everyone likes swearing, so they tell their children not to swear in public until they're old enough to decide when and when not to swear.
 
 
 
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