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    (Original post by foxo)
    I wager you couldn't tell me what 'otorhinolaryngological', 'floccinaucinihilipilification' or 'operosity' mean without consulting a dictionary. I could tell you though, and I swear all the ****ing time.
    I'll have a go without a dictionary:
    otorhinolaryngological-the logicalness of otorhinolaryngo
    floccinaucinihilipilification-the pilification of floccinaucinihili
    operosity-a medical term for the disease contracted by not ******* swearing enough.
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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    I'll have a go without a dictionary:
    otorhinolaryngological-the logicalness of otorhinolaryngo
    floccinaucinihilipilification-the pilification of floccinaucinihili
    operosity-a medical term for the disease contracted by not ******* swearing enough.
    :rofl:
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    Because adult's are hypocrites and all they want is their children to grow up the best they can in society.
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    I too find the notion that we should have restricted words ridiculous, I always have. Generally I don't swear anyway cause I find the words rather meaningless personally.
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    I agree. ive alwayds found it strange how much a word can effect someone. saying Duck is fine but replacing that one little letter and its "awful"
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    mmm, I think one thing to bare in mind is we all have our subjective meanings to words. The only way we can communicate about intellectual matters is by language, but then we try to use language to get our meaning across and to check that the recipient has understood, using language the whole time as if it's objective.
    Of course there's not a lot else we really can use in conversation, but that's why to my Granny it would be "shocking" to my mum it would be "dis-respectful" to my brother it would be "just another word" to my cat it would be "long meow" so on so forth. Any word can be offensive to someone.
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Why are children taught not to swear, and why does children swearing cause uncomfortableness? Swearing plays an important part in most adult's vocabulary, so why are children taught not to do it?
    It isn't really just children, it is usually good manners, not to swear as adults even. Secondly, it would be pretty uncomfortable to hearing children use foul language. I know in my house, using most swear words is pretty much banned. I don't buy that "plays an important part", no it doesn't, it plays a pretty bad part.
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    because some people don't like them
    would you swear in a job interview?
    meeting your girlfriend's parents for the first time?
    meeting anyone essentially?

    the answer is of course no. you might swear in front of them loads once you get to know them and they might too, but it always creates a bad first impression because it's not considered polite.

    imo it's a load of **** anyway
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    (Original post by Slumpy)
    I've thought about this a few times, and the most reasonable explanation I can come up with is that overuse of a word lessens the power, so swearing when you're young makes words lose their potency.
    Although, this is almost certainly not the reason we're told not to, I'd imagine that's because parents feel they'd be shown up by their kids swearing(although this really doesn't answer your question as to why that's a bad thing).
    I think this post has it correctly.

    The whole point of swear words is that they are offensive and that you are told when you are a child not to use them. The whole pleasure of using one of that special collection of 'naughty' words is that you shouldn't be using them. The whole force and satisfaction in a good, loud profanity is that other people are likely to be shocked by it.

    You should censor, discourage, withhold and hide swear words, so that when you do need to pull one out into the sunlight, it will be profane, shocking and unfamiliar, rather than tired and familiar.

    If you like to use swear words, you should discourage their use. It's the game. Anyone who says 'I like to swear, and I don't see why I shouldn't teach children to use swear words regularly' is entirely misguided.
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    (Original post by ma2k5)
    It isn't really just children, it is usually good manners, not to swear as adults even. Secondly, it would be pretty uncomfortable to hearing children use foul language. I know in my house, using most swear words is pretty much banned. I don't buy that "plays an important part", no it doesn't, it plays a pretty bad part.
    And nothing could play that part any better!

    One of the points the op has made is that it's through social conventions, which you're agreeing with, that children shouldn't swear, but why should the op force a child he has to conform to those social conventions?
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    (Original post by MSB)
    I think this post has it correctly.

    The whole point of swear words is that they are offensive and that you are told when you are a child not to use them. The whole pleasure of using one of that special collection of 'naughty' words is that you shouldn't be using them. The whole force and satisfaction in a good, loud profanity is that other people are likely to be shocked by it.

    You should censor, discourage, withhold and hide swear words, so that when you do need to pull one out into the sunlight, it will be profane, shocking and unfamiliar, rather than tired and familiar.

    If you like to use swear words, you should discourage their use. It's the game. Anyone who says 'I like to swear, and I don't see why I shouldn't teach children to use swear words regularly' is entirely misguided.
    My use of swear words is usually laziness, I don't tend to give them a special light because I don't see the need to. If I get angry, and I need to shock someone, I'll just say the biggest load of garbage that comes out of my mouth, "at least I don't lick *** off ****** mens bottoms". When someone is angry and you say that, it doesn't tend to be overly funny for them .
    That's just me though, why should my use of swear words be the same as yours?
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    Why would anyone swear? It's unnecessary and offensive.
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    Because they don't understand (or shouldn't understand!) what these words mean, and tbh what they mean is often pretty graphic!

    I am determined to make sure my future child (or children) does not (do not) swear, at least in front of me anyway.

    Also it's not very classy to use swear words IMO, unless it's because of an extreme circumstance where it makes sense to use it.
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    (Original post by stevie0444)
    Yet most adults use it all the time in conversations.
    Generalisation followed swiftly by exaggeration :five:
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    To preserve the innocence of children... i think.
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    (Original post by Chick-ni)
    this is like asking why children shouldn't drink alcohol/smoke/watch porn/have sex

    :woo:
    Lol what a stupid comparison.

    If a child drinks, it could - would most likely - make them seriously ill. If a child smokes, again, it would most likely make them ill, and, if not, get them hooked on a dirty, undesirable, expensive habit at an early age. If a child watches porn or has sex at an early age, not only is it illegal, but it may mess them up emotionally, or get them pregnant/get them an STD.

    If a child swears however.... They might get a smack off of mummy? Or perhaps laughed at?

    Oh yeah, that's the same :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Kolya)
    Why are children taught not to swear, and why does children swearing cause uncomfortableness? Swearing plays an important part in most adult's vocabulary, so why are children taught not to do it?
    To answer simply, because it's a social taboo. Society by its very nature sets limits on what is and is not acceptable within social situations, and these conventions vary according to the context (swearing being more acceptable at football matches than churches for example).

    The reason I believe that children are taught not to swear is because negotiating the full range of what is and is not acceptable in certain situations is more difficult for children, given their relative social inexperience and their lessened capacity to understand context. To draw a parallel, I have Asperger's syndrome, and thus was not born with an innate sense of what is and is not socially acceptable in various contexts. Things like tone of voice, volume of voice, eye contact, respect for personal space etc, are all social conventions which can entail being considered "rude" if one is to transgress them. Inevitably, being autistic, I transgressed them a hell of a lot when I was growing up, and had to manually learn of the course of several years what was and wasn't acceptable in terms of various small gestures which to most people come fairly naturally. The prohibition of swearing seems an example of this, however unlike the other examples it is much easier for parents, who to an extent act as role models for children, to observe and negatively reinforce against. Once a child is mature, they have a greater capacity to tell what the particular "rules of the game" are in a given social situation. However, until that point, the parent acts to discourage swearing because of its potentially harmful implications in terms of social stigma.
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    I'm 19 and I don't swear, do I win :woo: ?
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    (Original post by Donnahh)
    Just the rude, ignorant ones
    Actually most, ignorant and rude or not, swear in everyday language.
 
 
 
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