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    Has anyone ever made an appeal to the examiners/proctors on their prelims results? I understand its extremely difficult to get them to show their comments on your exam, even worse let you see your script, which I think is pretty ridiculous. However, I understand that if you pay a £10 fee, the tutors of your college can possibly obtain the exam comments, or even a re-mark if neccessary. Has anyone done this, just out of interest, as I would really like to access the comments and/or script if possible.
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    If you havent actually failed it really isnt worth the fuss for prelims.
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    http://www.ox.ac.uk/current_students...als/index.html

    "Complaints about the conduct of University examinations (academic appeals)

    An academic appeal is a formal questioning of a decision on an academic matter made by the responsible academic body.
    Undergraduate or Postgraduate Taught students:

    Students must not contact examiners direct with queries or complaints. Instead they should raise any concerns with the College Officer responsible for their work (e.g. Senior Tutor) who can then forward them to the Proctors.

    If you are unhappy with the outcome then a formal complaint should be made in writing to the University Proctors. More information can be found on the Proctors' Office website in the Essential Information for Students guide and the University regulations.

    Please remember that in connection with all academic appeals:

    1. The Proctors are not empowered to challenge the academic judgement of examiners or academic bodies.
    2. The Proctors can consider whether the procedures for reaching an academic decision were properly followed; i.e. whether there was a significant procedural administrative error; whether there is evidence of bias or inadequate assessment; whether the examiners failed to take into account special factors affecting a candidate’s performance.
    3. On no account should you contact your examiners or assessors directly.

    The Proctors will indicate what further action you can take if you are dissatisfied with the outcome of a complaint or appeal considered by them."

    As far as I know, you are misinformed about paying a tenner to get the examiners' comments. I think in fact that the examiners are told not to write anything on the scripts anyway!

    BUT, as TB says, why bother, if you passed?

    DtS
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    i) it's prelims - who seriously gives a flying ****?
    ii) most examiners will not write on scripts - as far as I know, all that they seem willing to do is tick a page to show that they have in fact read it. Marks etc. have no place on a double-marked script, as they could well influence the second examiner (although I'm not entirely sure if prelims are all double-marked, but whatever)
    iii) comments, if any, are generally made separately from the scripts and destroyed soon after the final examiner's meeting
    iv) I think you can request your scripts returned to you, but it needs to be done before the examination is over (i.e. before the end of the last paper).
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    Basically 1) unless you're a lawyer and need a better mark for internships there is literally zero reason to do this 2) they won't remark. The general policy (for finals certainly) is that your mark may change if there is evidence that something was done WRONG but the examiner's opinion can't be changed. So if for instance they marked you down on coursework because they somehow lost pages then it could be appealed, but if the examiner didn't like what you wrote then you can't.

    As others have said getting your scripts back will do little except get you a second opinion from your tutor. The examiners almost certainly won't have written on them.
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    Ok guys, I did indeed pass- got a 2:1, but it was borderline (like 60%). I was not happy with this- I expected a middling 2:1 at least. I would really like some feedback as I know that I could benefit from it and I am definitely aiming for a first in finals. Yes they may only be prelims but clearly they are of some symbolic importance because you can get a double-starred first after your third year if you get a distinction in them and a first in your finals. Also people who get a distinction in one ******* exam that is supposedly inconsequential become Oxford SCHOLARS.

    Enough said.
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    get over it
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    What probably not said. You got 60%, you were expecting 65%ish. Who cares.
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    PS Helper
    (Original post by SpeciousCho)
    Ok guys, I did indeed pass- got a 2:1, but it was borderline (like 60%). I was not happy with this- I expected a middling 2:1 at least. I would really like some feedback as I know that I could benefit from it and I am definitely aiming for a first in finals. Yes they may only be prelims but clearly they are of some symbolic importance because you can get a double-starred first after your third year if you get a distinction in them and a first in your finals. Also people who get a distinction in one ***king exam that is supposedly inconsequential become Oxford SCHOLARS.

    Enough said.
    Surely that point's irrelevant here, though?:confused: You didn't get a distinction (and to be fair, you weren't actually expecting to get one), and you wouldn't get one even if you appealed.
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    it's also incorrect - getting a first in prelims and finals can be informally known as a "double first" but there's no formal recognition of it, and it certainly isn't a "double-starred first".

    and getting a distinction involves three exams... getting a first (not a distinction) in one of them doesn't entail a scholarship. further the idea of being an "oxford scholar" is a bit misleading - you're elected to a scholarship by your college, not the university. some colleges might elect you to a scholarship without getting a distinction; others won't necessarily elect you to one if you do.

    goooooo pedantry.
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    1. Clearly you're not going to go from 60 to 70 so any hopes of being a scholar are irrelevant. I'll address your misunderstandings anyway, but you can't jump 10% BY AGGREGATE - i.e. if you had three papers you need to jump 10% in all of them or 30% in one - by appeal.
    2. Appealing your mark is not going to get you feedback, it's just going to confirm whether your mark was right. IT won't change, and it won't get you detailed feedback because examiners do not mark exams like they do essays. They don't write helpful comments. The script will be blank.
    3. Being a scholar is entirely dependent upon your college. There is no centralised system. Some of us averaged 76 and STILL weren't scholars.
    4. Double firsts don't exist in Oxford. They do in Cambridge where you have Tripos but there's no formal definition, everybody has different understandings of what it means so it's not something you put on your CV or anything.
    5. Getting a first - not just in one exam but IN YOUR ENTIRE FIRST YEAR - may entitle you to being a scholar (see above) but equally you say that like it's being a Rhodes scholar or something. It's not particularly prestigious - it just means a warmer gown and a couple of hundred quid.
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    (Original post by Bekaboo)
    1. Clearly you're not going to go from 60 to 70 so any hopes of being a scholar are irrelevant. I'll address your misunderstandings anyway, but you can't jump 10% BY AGGREGATE - i.e. if you had three papers you need to jump 10% in all of them or 30% in one - by appeal.
    2. Appealing your mark is not going to get you feedback, it's just going to confirm whether your mark was right. IT won't change, and it won't get you detailed feedback because examiners do not mark exams like they do essays. They don't write helpful comments. The script will be blank.
    3. Being a scholar is entirely dependent upon your college. There is no centralised system. Some of us averaged 76 and STILL weren't scholars.
    4. Double firsts don't exist in Oxford. They do in Cambridge where you have Tripos but there's no formal definition, everybody has different understandings of what it means so it's not something you put on your CV or anything.
    5. Getting a first - not just in one exam but IN YOUR ENTIRE FIRST YEAR - may entitle you to being a scholar (see above) but equally you say that like it's being a Rhodes scholar or something. It's not particularly prestigious - it just means a warmer gown and a couple of hundred quid.
    I might join you on this one. With being ranked 4th out of 5 in my college and being a lazy arse throughout the year, i wouldnt be suprised.
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    Ok, I know that one needs to obtain a first in all of their prelims exams, (not just one) to get a distinction! But surely one of the best universities in the world should offer their students the benefit of learning from their mistakes? It's a bit ridiculous- even Cambridge allows its students to view their scripts- for free!
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    (Original post by SpeciousCho)
    ...should offer their students the benefit of learning from their mistakes?
    Yes: it's the two or three years you now have before finals. If you are really that bothered, ask your tutor(s) to go through the questions with you. You know how you answered, right? (Obsessive person that you are.) So discuss with them and learn a bit. Oh, and please stop being such a d**khead.

    DtS
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    (Original post by SpeciousCho)
    Ok, I know that one needs to obtain a first in all of their prelims exams, (not just one) to get a distinction! But surely one of the best universities in the world should offer their students the benefit of learning from their mistakes? It's a bit ridiculous- even Cambridge allows its students to view their scripts- for free!
    But how is that going to help you? If you came out with a 60 then the mark scheme will tell you what you did wrong. I.e. something like "A satisfactory answer but lacking one or two points, or badly organised." Seeing your script isn't going to help with that. You know that you need to work on including original information, covering everything that you should know and your structure. Knowing exactly what information you missed out in the first place is unlikely to help you unless the same questions come up again at finals. I'm not saying it's not annoying not being able to see your scripts - but only for curiosity's sake. Reading what you wrote isn't going to help you write it better next year.
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    Presumably you remember the gist of the arguments in your essays; why can't you just go over what you wrote with your tutor? Presumably he/she would be able to pick some holes in your answers and tell you all of the points you didn't consider.
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    (Original post by Bekaboo)
    3. Being a scholar is entirely dependent upon your college. There is no centralised system. Some of us averaged 76 and STILL weren't scholars.
    :confused:

    How does that work? Did you have to get a first in every exam to be awarded a scholarship? I thought 70%+ got you an automatic scholarship in every college?

    (for context I've just finished moderations)
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    nah, some colleges can just decide you don't deserve a scholarship if you've pissed someone off/the rest of the people in your year did better than you/they're running out of money and can't afford the £100 a year/you're a sagittarius
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    (Original post by Icy_Mikki)
    :confused:

    How does that work? Did you have to get a first in every exam to be awarded a scholarship? I thought 70%+ got you an automatic scholarship in every college?

    (for context I've just finished moderations)
    *Shakes head sadly*
    For most colleges I wouldn't worry about it because really that's the general pattern. But often if there's a certain subject that a college does particularly well in, for instance, they will only give scholarships to the top people. E.g. I can't remember exact numbers but Jesus have something like 6 or 7 Chemists in a year, and I remember two years above me there were three girls who had got something like 5th, 7th and 13th in the year in mods (and Chemistry is a BIG year). So they only give out scholarships to the ones who do really well and not to those who scraped a first.

    In my case it was really more to do with the fact that my results came out late, and my tutor hadn't thought to stake some of the money just-in-case, but the official line was that improving my average by 11%, and technically beating my tute partner who was a scholar by a 10th of a percent ( :p: ) didn't guarantee me a scholarship so I couldn't complain :rolleyes
    :
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    At Worcester they're somewhat more generous. They give you £200 a year (guaranteed to all scholar's), a £70 one-off 'golden hello', and dinner with the provost in your final year (or if you can sneakily confuse the college admin regarding whether your course is 3 or 4 years, two dinners!)
 
 
 
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