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    (Original post by Lachlan)
    Well put it this way. If I go to LSE, in London mind so an extra thousand a year, I get £2,120 loan for living costs plus £3,225 in tuition fees. On top of this my parents are to contribute £3,590 a year. So if tuition fees don't rise I will be in £16,035 debt by the time I graduate. Its not going to kill me but it is definitely worth considering and is the reason I am intending to try to get my offer cancelled and go to Edinburgh instead.
    Personally, in your position, I'd pick Edinburgh. Rent in London is easily £140 a week if you want to be anywhere near central- £100 a week for the luxury of a 30min bus ride. In second year you might find your friends spread over half the city in order to make it affordable- it really cuts down on the socialising aspect. LSE undergrads have been pretty loud recently in condemning the quality of teaching there too- PhD students get lumped with a lot of it. £10,000 in tuition is pretty hefty over paying nothing at Edinburgh, and while LSE does have its name as one of the best economic institutions in the world, I don't think the situation will be irretrievable if you were to come out with a good Edinburgh degree. All that said, Edinburgh, in my experience (but on a lesser scale) suffers from the same problem as the LSE- its spread out a bit and the sense of student community can feel a bit disjointed. I have a couple of friends who've graduated in econ from there though, and along with a few of my pals from Glasgow, they've all been taken on by various banks on starting salaries approaching 30k in different parts of the UK. When you've been around the uni block, you realise this 'gap' between Oxbridge/LSE/Imperial and the rest is much smaller than TSR gives it credit for.
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    (Original post by exeteroredinburgh)
    What Uni are you going to? I understand your point about the snobs espesh since Im probably gonna be the opposite of their "typical" student but tbh....anywhere nice is gonna have its fair share of snobs so am just not gonna concentrate on them!
    Well I'm applying for Glasgow , Edinburgh, St Andrews & Durham.
    So if I get the grades I'd like to go to Durham... but failing that I like the looks of Glasgow. It's not the hole it was in the 70s I think a lot of people forget that.. it's a really good university with amazing people. My brother went there instead of St Andrews and he's said he's so glad he went because the people there are all decent and it's friendlier in general.
    I noticed that considerably when I went to the open days.
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    (Original post by exeteroredinburgh)
    Thank-you HEAPS for your input. Did you go into catered halls for 1st year? Do you go back and visit home much?
    I lived in self catered, albiet, not the nicest of self catered halls (sciennes!) but there is a much wider choice.
    i travelled home each regular holiday, and in between sometimes. flights, in advance, from exeter to edinburgh are cheap enough, even cheaper between bristol and exeter.

    feel free to pm me about either of the cities, happy to help as much as i can.
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    (Original post by 0404343m)
    Personally, in your position, I'd pick Edinburgh. Rent in London is easily £140 a week if you want to be anywhere near central- £100 a week for the luxury of a 30min bus ride. In second year you might find your friends spread over half the city in order to make it affordable- it really cuts down on the socialising aspect. LSE undergrads have been pretty loud recently in condemning the quality of teaching there too- PhD students get lumped with a lot of it. £10,000 in tuition is pretty hefty over paying nothing at Edinburgh, and while LSE does have its name as one of the best economic institutions in the world, I don't think the situation will be irretrievable if you were to come out with a good Edinburgh degree. All that said, Edinburgh, in my experience (but on a lesser scale) suffers from the same problem as the LSE- its spread out a bit and the sense of student community can feel a bit disjointed. I have a couple of friends who've graduated in econ from there though, and along with a few of my pals from Glasgow, they've all been taken on by various banks on starting salaries approaching 30k in different parts of the UK. When you've been around the uni block, you realise this 'gap' between Oxbridge/LSE/Imperial and the rest is much smaller than TSR gives it credit for.
    Well my accommodation at LSE is £103 a week but the halls do strongly resemble a prison.

    There is also added benefit to Edinburgh in that we own a flat there which my dad only occupies 3 days a week - rest of the week its Villa de Lachlan. So with little rent I am probably about £2000 better off a year without loan debt being considered. I could be saving money at Edinburgh so the difference in graduating wealth could easily be in excess of 25k. Somehow I do struggle to imagine how LSE can be worth that much. Also probably marginally easier to get a 1st at Edinburgh which would certainly be the goal.

    On top of this I could do a lot more maths and statistics at Edinburgh due to course flexibility. So yeah Edinburgh does look the favourite. When I first applied to unis I also applied to Oxford which I would have loved to have gone to, LSE isn't quite the same tbh.
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    oh, i'd also like to add that there are lovely sandy beaches near edinburgh, about 10-15 minutes on the bus? however, they aren't surfing beaches, but none the less, still fun!
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    (Original post by AnnyRoquentin)
    I lived in self catered, albiet, not the nicest of self catered halls (sciennes!) but there is a much wider choice.
    i travelled home each regular holiday, and in between sometimes. flights, in advance, from exeter to edinburgh are cheap enough, even cheaper between bristol and exeter.

    feel free to pm me about either of the cities, happy to help as much as i can.
    Ahhhh! Thats where my big sis stayed! Many happy visits there although yah, veeeery teeny tiny rooms and a lack of proper living room! Do you think that being able to go home down south reguarlly meant that Edinburgh's climate and the fact its a big city wasnt seen by you as a drawback? Cos Im originally from a lil Scottish town but will only have my Uni add as my home when I go to Uni as my Mum's moving abroad and we don't really get on anyways....so my Uni home will kida be my home I guess. Sooooo...knowing this...do you think a city/campus would be better for not getting lonely during the hols?
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    (Original post by exeteroredinburgh)
    Ahhhh! Thats where my big sis stayed! Many happy visits there although yah, veeeery teeny tiny rooms and a lack of proper living room! Do you think that being able to go home down south reguarlly meant that Edinburgh's climate and the fact its a big city wasnt seen by you as a drawback? Cos Im originally from a lil Scottish town but will only have my Uni add as my home when I go to Uni as my Mum's moving abroad and we don't really get on anyways....so my Uni home will kida be my home I guess. Sooooo...knowing this...do you think a city/campus would be better for not getting lonely during the hols?
    I'd say a city would be less lonely.
    Campus universities can completely empty when it's not term time (personal experience), but at least in Edinburgh there are a whole load of other unis, with different terms, etc.. with something always going on.
    Edinburgh also has the Fringe (biggest arts festival in the world), the International film festival. So there's plenty on over the summer.
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    (Original post by jaz_jaz)
    Exeter is more in the middle/easy to travel to other places.
    Edinburgh seems all isolated.
    It's near Glasgow and Newcastle.
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    (Original post by creamegg)
    I'd say a city would be less lonely.
    Campus universities can completely empty when it's not term time (personal experience), but at least in Edinburgh there are a whole load of other unis, with different terms, etc.. with something always going on.
    Edinburgh also has the Fringe (biggest arts festival in the world), the International film festival. So there's plenty on over the summer.
    Hmmmm. Thats pretty tempting. WHat Uni did you go to?
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    (Original post by Lachlan)
    Well my accommodation at LSE is £103 a week but the halls do strongly resemble a prison.

    There is also added benefit to Edinburgh in that we own a flat there which my dad only occupies 3 days a week - rest of the week its Villa de Lachlan. So with little rent I am probably about £2000 better off a year without loan debt being considered. I could be saving money at Edinburgh so the difference in graduating wealth could easily be in excess of 25k. Somehow I do struggle to imagine how LSE can be worth that much. Also probably marginally easier to get a 1st at Edinburgh which would certainly be the goal.

    On top of this I could do a lot more maths and statistics at Edinburgh due to course flexibility. So yeah Edinburgh does look the favourite. When I first applied to unis I also applied to Oxford which I would have loved to have gone to, LSE isn't quite the same tbh.
    I really don't know about it being 'easier' to get a first, they expect a hell of a lot at Edinburgh too, and not many of their students get top grades. It's not necessarily easier to get marks at less selective universities (although sometimes they do indulge in grade inflation to boost league rank), some places think the path to the top is through keeping standards high, and Edinburgh have built up a reputation that they won't want to swap for a few more firsts if it means those that'll be taking their grads on are unimpressed.

    Anyway, the LSE does have a powerful brand, and you would get more independence from the family down there. 25k is a lot of money, but nothing that a few years of earning can't sort. Whether the LSE alone will gain you better pay in later life is certainly open to debate, evidence suggests only a very limited number of employers hold a pre-interview bias towards certain institutions, and even then the name is one of the last things they use to split very even candidates, but if the city is where you want to go, then the London starting salaries as shown by published figures are hard to top. It's not an easy decision, but there's always masters, and your only young once- I don't think you'll be sacrificing a huge amount to take Edinburgh.

    Oh, and I wouldn't worry too much about Oxford. Yes, its a nice place- but its not the chasm in quality you think it is- a student who had a good day in their exams and got AAA as opposed to AAB and impressed a couple of people in an interview is still only a school leaver, academically the difference is pretty hard to notice, aside from the genuinely really bright sparks that Oxbridge tends to have more of. You'll still see plenty in Edinburgh though- the Scottish education system means the very best who weren't fortunate enough to be able to sit the advanced highers at their school and thus are prohibited from leaving Scotland, end up (predominantly) at Edinburgh and Glasgow- having seen both sides of the coin, I'm of the opinion this gulf in class is largely a myth, and your future prospects are for you to make or break. Don't swap where you think you'll be happier for some league table bragging rights, thats not how the outside world works.
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    (Original post by exeteroredinburgh)
    Hmmmm. Thats pretty tempting. WHat Uni did you go to?
    I go to Stirling (which is a craphole).
    I'm from Edinburgh, and after now living in Stirling for two years I commute to Stirling daily. After living here, any city apart from London (in the UK) just seems like a disappointment.
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    (Original post by exeteroredinburgh)
    Ahhhh! Thats where my big sis stayed! Many happy visits there although yah, veeeery teeny tiny rooms and a lack of proper living room! Do you think that being able to go home down south reguarlly meant that Edinburgh's climate and the fact its a big city wasnt seen by you as a drawback? Cos Im originally from a lil Scottish town but will only have my Uni add as my home when I go to Uni as my Mum's moving abroad and we don't really get on anyways....so my Uni home will kida be my home I guess. Sooooo...knowing this...do you think a city/campus would be better for not getting lonely during the hols?
    i love edinburgh's climate! not nearly as rainy as the west coast, and yeah it's colder than home, but there are a lot of those lovely crisp cold wintery mornings.
    also, if anything i love the fact it's a big city, exeter is so small and suffocating (but i've lived there for 20 years mind).

    anyway, city would be infinitely less lonely i should imagine, i'm home in exeter at the moment, however i'd say about 60% of my friends in edinburgh are staying there for the holiday. also if you stay in edinburgh for the holidays you have the fringe festival and all sorts.
    also, some friends and i were up feeding the ducks on the exeter campus the other day and it seemed pretty much deserted since it's the holidays.
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    (Original post by 0404343m)
    I really don't know about it being 'easier' to get a first, they expect a hell of a lot at Edinburgh too, and not many of their students get top grades. It's not necessarily easier to get marks at less selective universities (although sometimes they do indulge in grade inflation to boost league rank), some places think the path to the top is through keeping standards high, and Edinburgh have built up a reputation that they won't want to swap for a few more firsts if it means those that'll be taking their grads on are unimpressed.
    I was basing this on the simple measure of entry standards which are lower at Edinburgh, and percentage of good honours awarded which is higher. This could of course be down to better teaching standards but either way it would seem one stands a better chance of graduating with a good degree at Edinburgh. I do also know that the Maths department awards ~ 20% firsts. Which is I believe pretty high.

    Anyway thanks for the advice, if you don't mind me asking where did you go to University? I see that you are pointedly vague in your profile.
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    (Original post by Lachlan)
    I was basing this on the simple measure of entry standards which are lower at Edinburgh, and percentage of good honours awarded which is higher. This could of course be down to better teaching standards but either way it would seem one stands a better chance of graduating with a good degree at Edinburgh. I do also know that the Maths department awards ~ 20% firsts. Which is I believe pretty high.

    Anyway thanks for the advice, if you don't mind me asking where did you go to University? I see that you are pointedly vague in your profile.
    ...and deliberately so. :tongue: I think the clues are there if you look for them. :holmes:

    20% firsts in the Sciences is actually not all that uncommon- Edinburgh was giving out around 16% firsts I believe for the university on the whole, but arts are traditionally always lower than sciences (where there is more firsts, but more 2:2/3rds), so that would probably tally up. One of the Oxford Colleges gave out something like 46% firsts in a subject once, and Durham's history dept gave out 36% firsts (a monumental amount for an arts course) just two years ago. You find that the difference between students with 420 UCAS points and 480 or so is actually pretty slim- some people merely matured a bit quicker (EDIT: and your average Scot only does highers, so they have less on average, meaning more Scots in a university = lower average entry standards), and the Scottish four year system is usually good at pulling people up by giving them more time in the university way of life. I can't talk for the LSE's teaching standards, since I know very little of them (aside from an academic I know who taught there and basically did nothing except from final year classes, letting the PhD students do much of the rest), but there are a lot of things that can explain a small percentage more of top grades- ease of the course just one of them. If you really think you'll prefer Edinburgh though, go for it- you're not going to get a first anywhere if you're miserable for the duration of your course.
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    Edinburgh because it's a lovely lovely city, and I think the university has a slightly better reputation, especially for medicine. I'm considering my Postgrad there. I wouldn't go to Exeter personally.
 
 
 
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