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Are AS levels really really that hard (talking about bio, chem, maths & psychology) Watch

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    Okay this may be a silly question but are AS levels really as hard as people say they are [compared to gcses mainly]? Do you have to work like 6 hours a night after school and just be studying like 24/7 (not literally but you know what I mean) and be buying tons of really big books and taking notes all the time and revising during free periods, weekends, holidays and the most of after school to get grades AAAA?

    So:
    - How many hours did you study per night (in total or per subject?)
    - What revision methods did you use throughout year 12?
    - When did you actually start to learn at home instead of just at school (e.g. from the very first day, from mid september, from october, etc..?)
    - What times did you revise (e.g. from 4pm to ..?, etc..)
    - How much of a difficulty increase from GCSE to AS level? A lot, a little, what?

    Thank you
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    yes you do have to work that hard...if only i could go back in time...
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    AS levels were easy. : D
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    - 1 at most
    - I didn;t till the last week or so (ie exam time)
    - Not sure - some subjects from the start cos the teacher wasn't very good
    - Whenever i could be bothered
    - Much more difficult in most subjects, and yet, still very easy,
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    You don't have to work that hard.
    1/2 hours a night did it for me.
    Just pay attention in class and your half way there.
    Long as you work effectivley, not that hard at all
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    A -levels assuming you did well in your GCSEs should be a pretty straight forward level for yourself.

    And yes working hard to understand the concepts and methods of answering the questions set out in the exam papers are essential. Understanding these and knowing how to answer them the correct way is key . But you also have to study in your own time and work hard if you want those AAAA.

    -I studied pretty hard every night 2 - 3 weeks before my exams, asnwering past papers and just remembering key concepts, it also depends on what subjects you are taking. Eg, Sociology you have ideological theories you need to learn, marxism, feminism, or maths where you need to learn forumale and problem solving, etc
    - I used sticky notes and put them around the house in places i would be, eg on my wardrobe so when i get dressed i would look at them, this refreshing concepts and formula in my head
    - from january onwards is when i started studying by myself(after a good xmas that is !)
    - revisied from 5pm - 11pm
    -difficulty is dependant on your approach to your studies, and yourself generally, someone with average GCSE's can still achieve AAAA's, it might just take ALOT of hard work, but someone who achieved all A's at GCSE can end up with low A levels(unlikely but lets get real)

    i hope this helped...
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    - How many hours did you study per night (in total or per subject?)4 in total, but I didn't study until 3-5 weeks before the exams. Until then I simply done homework.
    - What revision methods did you use throughout year 12?Last minute
    - When did you actually start to learn at home instead of just at school (e.g. from the very first day, from mid september, from october, etc..?)December until january, and april until june
    - What times did you revise (e.g. from 4pm to ..?, etc..) |At my peak 4.30-9
    - How much of a difficulty increase from GCSE to AS level? A lot, a little, what?There is a noted increase nothing too major I struggled more with A2 to be honest, but that was to do with coursework. From what I hear there is quite a spec change in chemistry from GCSE to AS.
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    It begins fairly challenging but I wouldn´t say it was that hard. But when you look back at GCSEs, they were pathetically easy in comparison, but you don't normally notice it.
    I didn´t really mstudy that much until the exams. But you get about half a hours worth of workn per subject a week. Technically they expect you to spend a hour a week per subject to revise your notes, but nobody does that.
    I haven´t gone through year 12 yet, but the best way to revise is to re-write your notes in my opinion.
    They give you homework in the very first week, so you work at hoem straighaway, unless you prefer to do it in your frees.
    I didn´t revise until the exams, so suffered by revising every night a week before the exam, from 7 till 12.
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    I did all those subjects (and English Lit) and it's absolutely nothing like that.

    - How many hours did you study per night (in total or per subject?)
    Well I did the homework, so however long that took. I didn't revise throughout the year or anything like that.

    - What revision methods did you use throughout year 12?
    THROUGHOUT year 12?! None. At exam time, I just read over the textbooks 1/2 days before the exams depending on how much there was to learn. (Actually, a bit longer than that for chemistry which had a lot to learn). I wouldn't recommend that though. I remember things best by reading them but you might prefer writing them down or recording them on tape or whatever.

    - When did you actually start to learn at home instead of just at school (e.g. from the very first day, from mid september, from october, etc..?)
    Aside from the homework, in january just before the exams and in may a week before the exams.

    - What times did you revise (e.g. from 4pm to ..?, etc..)
    In study leave, I did full days usually the day before exams, otherwise no times in particular. I didn't really do anything before study leave.

    - How much of a difficulty increase from GCSE to AS level? A lot, a little, what?
    I haven't really thought about it... There's definitely more to learn. I did Add Maths in y11 so AS maths wasn't that much different. I think the summer modules have been considerably harder than the january modules or at least had more to learn, particularly for chemistry. It's all been manageable though.

    Do you have to work like 6 hours a night after school and just be studying like 24/7 (not literally but you know what I mean) and be buying tons of really big books and taking notes all the time and revising during free periods, weekends, holidays and the most of after school to get grades AAAA?
    This is completely ridiculous. You don't need to buy any books either. Your school should give you the textbooks. I just used those, but I spose you could get revision guides if you wanted. Where on earth did you get this from?
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    (Original post by Princestia)
    Okay this may be a silly question but are AS levels really as hard as people say they are [compared to gcses mainly]? Do you have to work like 6 hours a night after school and just be studying like 24/7 (not literally but you know what I mean) and be buying tons of really big books and taking notes all the time and revising during free periods, weekends, holidays and the most of after school to get grades AAAA?

    So:
    - How many hours did you study per night (in total or per subject?)
    - What revision methods did you use throughout year 12?
    - When did you actually start to learn at home instead of just at school (e.g. from the very first day, from mid september, from october, etc..?)
    - What times did you revise (e.g. from 4pm to ..?, etc..)
    - How much of a difficulty increase from GCSE to AS level? A lot, a little, what?

    Thank you
    I got 4As and what I did wasn't the best way of going about things :redface: ( I did Maths, Further Maths, Economics and Business Studies)

    - How many hours did you study per night (in total or per subject?) - I did very little from September to about March before cramming everything and working non-stop from April to the exams. This is a bad way to do things and doesn't set you up for Uni at all. It's much better to space yourself out.
    - What revision methods did you use throughout year 12? - I did write some notes for subjects like Economics and Bus studies whereas for Maths my revision technique was to do as many questions as possible from the textbooks before doing as many past papers as possible.
    - When did you actually start to learn at home instead of just at school (e.g. from the very first day, from mid September, from October, etc..?) - Like I said before I was a very late starter and although I did work at school and learn some stuff I started actual work quite late in April for the June exams.
    - What times did you revise (e.g. from 4pm to ..?, etc..) - In between September to March from 6pm to 7pm, but from April to exams I did as many hours as possible, so I'd spend all day revising in the weekend and as many hours as possible each evening too, maybe from 6pm to 11pm
    - How much of a difficulty increase from GCSE to AS level? A lot, a little, what? - It depends on the subject I guess and it also depends a lot on each individual student, some might say it's easy others will say they were difficult and there was a big change. Overall it does get a bit harder, you have to put in more work, there are more exams but how easy or hard you find it will depend on how much work you put in. I definitely found it a bit hard at times because I crammed for both my AS exams and A2 exams. If I'd spread my work out then I probably would have found it much easier :yy:
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    The good thing about science subjects and maths is that you can revise a whole unit in the 2 or 3 days before the exam, so long as you have made a few notes and kind of get the jist.
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    (Original post by Meliae)
    I did all those subjects (and English Lit) and it's absolutely nothing like that.

    - How many hours did you study per night (in total or per subject?)
    Well I did the homework, so however long that took. I didn't revise throughout the year or anything like that.

    - What revision methods did you use throughout year 12?
    THROUGHOUT year 12?! None. At exam time, I just read over the textbooks 1/2 days before the exams depending on how much there was to learn. (Actually, a bit longer than that for chemistry which had a lot to learn). I wouldn't recommend that though. I remember things best by reading them but you might prefer writing them down or recording them on tape or whatever.

    - When did you actually start to learn at home instead of just at school (e.g. from the very first day, from mid september, from october, etc..?)
    Aside from the homework, in january just before the exams and in may a week before the exams.

    - What times did you revise (e.g. from 4pm to ..?, etc..)
    In study leave, I did full days usually the day before exams, otherwise no times in particular. I didn't really do anything before study leave.

    - How much of a difficulty increase from GCSE to AS level? A lot, a little, what?
    I haven't really thought about it... There's definitely more to learn. I did Add Maths in y11 so AS maths wasn't that much different. I think the summer modules have been considerably harder than the january modules or at least had more to learn, particularly for chemistry. It's all been manageable though.


    This is completely ridiculous. You don't need to buy any books either. Your school should give you the textbooks. I just used those, but I spose you could get revision guides if you wanted. Where on earth did you get this from?
    Wise words, wise words.
    You speak the truth.:yes:
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    (Original post by Princestia)
    Okay this may be a silly question but are AS levels really as hard as people say they are [compared to gcses mainly]? Do you have to work like 6 hours a night after school and just be studying like 24/7 (not literally but you know what I mean) and be buying tons of really big books and taking notes all the time and revising during free periods, weekends, holidays and the most of after school to get grades AAAA?

    So:
    - How many hours did you study per night (in total or per subject?)
    - What revision methods did you use throughout year 12?
    - When did you actually start to learn at home instead of just at school (e.g. from the very first day, from mid september, from october, etc..?)
    - What times did you revise (e.g. from 4pm to ..?, etc..)
    - How much of a difficulty increase from GCSE to AS level? A lot, a little, what?

    Thank you
    Okay, I'm only a GCSE student, just finished, but I did take a A-Level in E-Business early, and a AS in General Science.

    Now I know, it probably wont as been in-depth as AS-Sciences in their seperate sciences, but basically it was about understanding the concepts and other stuff, at first it is hard to pick up, and I did revision the day before my exam, got 36/40 over my two pieces of coursework, and think I might have JUST got an A in the exam, not too sure though because I just didn't revise.

    If there is one thing I can say about it that normal AS students might not be so aware of as they probably didn't do GCSE and AS exams at the same time, is the detail, and ability you have to have to hit key notes in the exam.

    2 Marks for a definition of respiration. I can do it easily now, but in my first mock pretty much the whole class got 1 mark for it, because we didn't realise the extra detail you have to go into to get the marks.

    All in all I think I will be alright with my choices of Chem and Bio, I'm terrified for Maths, I had a shocking teacher for 6 months, and Geography is going to hopefully be the ace up my sleeve!
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    AS Levels are hard when you don't do the work and have a really bad teacher. Apparently.
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    i took bio chem maths and psych, maths i think was the hardest chemistry is ok if u sit and learn it, biology is fairly easy if concentrate and psych was prob the easiest
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    Psychology = Easiest apparently
    Biology = Requires good exam technique but moderately easy at AS
    Chemistry = Pretty hard without enough work
    Physics = Same as Chemistry
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    Maths was alright but I did a crapload of exam papers before the exam and that helped ALOT. Bascially the exam was the same questions i'd seen in other papers just different numbers. Tbh you could start maths revision 2 weeks before the exam and still get a fairly high grade.
    ...Same thing with physics but instead of doing past papers (I couldn't because it was a new syllabus) I read the textbook and the revision guide over and over and did the sample questions in there.
    Chemistry I thought was quite easy personally...The first module was fairly simple as long as you actually understood the new concepts but in the second module there was alot more to learn but again as long as you could remember it you were fine. For me there was nothing conceptually difficult in chemistry as opposed to physics where I had to read stuff over and over again to get it.
    Oh and I did french aswell but that sucked
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    I did all but maths there and I found:

    - I did the homework and looked up over anything I didn't understand which took around 1 hour more than however long it takes to finish my homework.
    - I wrote my own notes and read them over and over. For chemistry I did practice papers.
    - I'm not quite sure what you mean by learn from home, I suppose I started revising for Jan exams at the beginning of december.
    - I usually stay in the library and do my homework there after school.
    - Its a moderate increase of difficultly from GCSE. In fact, GCSE seems ridiculously easy at some points.
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    (Original post by HighSkies)
    I did all but maths there and I found:

    - I did the homework and looked up over anything I didn't understand which took around 1 hour more than however long it takes to finish my homework.
    - I wrote my own notes and read them over and over. For chemistry I did practice papers.
    - I'm not quite sure what you mean by learn from home, I suppose I started revising for Jan exams at the beginning of december.
    - I usually stay in the library and do my homework there after school.
    - Its a moderate increase of difficultly from GCSE. In fact, GCSE seems ridiculously easy at some points.
    Hi again =D

    Ohh I see Seems like a good learning method If you don't mind, I was wondering what your predicted grades were for bio and chem? And also, what are you expecting to get in terms of grade for AS level after having done the exams in both? Did you do both unit 1 and 2 in june or unit 1 in january?

    Can I also please ask what exam boards you did for biology and chemistry?

    Thankss hun
    xxx
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    (Original post by Princestia)
    Hi again =D

    Ohh I see Seems like a good learning method If you don't mind, I was wondering what your predicted grades were for bio and chem? And also, what are you expecting to get in terms of grade for AS level after having done the exams in both? Did you do both unit 1 and 2 in june or unit 1 in january?

    Can I also please ask what exam boards you did for biology and chemistry?

    Thankss hun
    xxx
    lol, hi again. :p:

    When I put I did practice papers for chem I literally mean every available paper possible- my friends did maths and they did dozens of papers (I think around 38) but they did further maths too. They are much more intelligent than me though so it was easy for them. :o: So my advice from what my friends did would be to do practice papers too. Make sure that your notes you make in class throughout the year are concise and so that you can find what you need quickly when it comes to revision. My friend wrote all the topics she covered in a notebook at the beginning to make it easier to find things as they went through several notebooks. My predicted grades for biology and chemistry are A's at AS level. For both subjects I did one module in january and one in july. I got two A's in my jan modules and am expecting two A's again.

    Exam boards are AQA for bio and OCR for chem.
 
 
 
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