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    Maybe, I have to stop watching House but I haven't had a epiphany or inspiration in about five months. Its annoying as I always used to get them. Espically, around complex numbers and the last one I got was about partial differential equations.

    I found A levels extremely easy so yeah not having inspiration wasn't that bad. However, I find trying to teach first year uni maths is going like hell.

    It just seems it like you understand a little bit then the next day a little bit more. I haven't experience a big leap of understanding certainly I did during A levels.

    If only I was like House.

    P.S. I read on Terrence Tao blog it gets worse when the maths gets harder.
    P.P.S. Damn, you functions of finite subsets.
    P.P.P.S. I'm in two minds of whether I should carry on self studying during the summer holiday. Its bloody hard and so that could be argued that I should stop now because of that, but its probably better to understand now instead of later at uni where I will be tested on it.
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    Not sure I understand what you're asking... ?

    You won't be much worse off it you enjoy your summer, and leave the learning until uni starts. In fact, a period of relaxation might work out better for you.

    You will be tested on it at uni, but not before it is presented to you formally, not before you've been given appropriate tuition and help, and not before you've had plenty of time to explore and exploit the resources that you don't have just now.
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    if a levels are so easy why did you reject your other offers?
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    Despite my second year results being far from great, I still felt I got that "moment" quite near the beginning of the second year. I spent my first year struggling, but happened to come out with decent results.
    I spent the summer trekking in Africa, and not thinking about maths, at all.So maybe that contributed to something. But still just kick back and relax for the summer, and don't over analyse your thought processes.
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    Ya. A lot of prospective mathematics students stress over the summer, thinking that they will be tossed into the deep end on day 1. It isn't the case. Most departments will ease you into it, start from a topic you've already covered, but in a bit more detail, and make sure that everybody is on the same page at the beginning, at least.
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    (Original post by Phugoid)
    Not sure I understand what you're asking... ?
    I didn't ask a question.

    (Original post by Phugoid)
    You won't be much worse off it you enjoy your summer, and leave the learning until uni starts. In fact, a period of relaxation might work out better for you.

    You will be tested on it at uni, but not before it is presented to you formally, not before you've been given appropriate tuition and help, and not before you've had plenty of time to explore and exploit the resources that you don't have just now.
    But, yeah I did consider that. But, then I don't really want to watch TV all day and waste alot of time doing rubbish. I could exercise and stuff but the weather is pretty bad. That was my original plan during the summer holiday but then after wimbledon everything got all cloudy.

    P.S. Okay, I will ask three questions. How does one have inspiration? Does anyone have inspiration about uni maths? or is it more a series
    of small deductions?

    (Original post by Totally Tom)
    if a levels are so easy why did you reject your other offers?
    Nice quote of me. I didn't want to go to Warwick or York.
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    I didn't ask a question.


    But, yeah I did consider that. But, then I don't really want to watch TV all day and waste alot of time doing rubbish. I could exercise and stuff but the weather is pretty bad. That was my original plan during the summer holiday but then after wimbledon everything got all cloudy.

    P.S. Okay, I will ask three questions. How does one have inspiration? Does anyone have inspiration about uni maths? or is it more a series
    of small deductions?

    Nice quote of me. I didn't want to go to Warwick or York.
    Well I don't for one minute think anybody should waste their summer sitting in front of the TV. That's not good.

    During my summer holidays, here's some of the things I do:

    I read books for LEISURE ! :O During the semester, I don't get much chance to read a book that isn't uni related, and that means studying it, not just reading it. When uni finishes, I abandon those books and head for something different. Sometimes I still read maths books, but popular science maths books, or mathematical philosophy - something I can read at leisure, without having to absorb it all to a scholarly extent. Read fiction. Read some books outwith your subject area - you must be interested in more than maths.

    Get a project going! Restore a car, write and record an album, build something fun from scratch. Something DIY, but innovative, and fun.

    Go some day trips with a good book. It's not always ***** weather.

    Join a gym. No need to let your health suffer due to the weather.

    It can be hard to teach yourself mathematics. It's one of the hardest things to self-teach I'd say. Anything technical is difficult to self-teach. I self-teach myself, more or less, but I can't do it during summer. I don't attend lectures and rarely ask for the help of a tutor, but just being at uni gives you a structure to your learning, and sometimes, structure is all you need to battle through it. A lack of structure and structural guidance during the summer is what stops me in my tracks.

    As for inspiration, I'd suggest all of the above. Take up a new hobby, and you'll find mathematics in it somewhere. Doesn't matter whether it's a sport, or just reading, going nature walks, trips to the zoo, etc. You will find mathematics somewhere, and it will provoke questions for you. Doing maths for the sake of doing maths isn't much inspiring in itself. It's once you see it at work in the world that you get that inspiration injection.

    I have inspiration about uni maths.

    Yes, it is possible to get inspired by uni maths. It's so much more than just a 'series of deductions', but to see past that, you need context. And you will get that context from other areas of your life, other areas of observation.
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    I feel similarly, I want to do maths but when I actually do it I cba, I don't know what the heck is going on. Anyway, you're in a different situation.
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    (Original post by Simplicity)
    Maybe, I have to stop watching House but I haven't had a epiphany or inspiration in about five months. Its annoying as I always used to get them. Espically, around complex numbers and the last one I got was about partial differential equations.

    I found A levels extremely easy so yeah not having inspiration wasn't that bad. However, I find trying to teach first year uni maths is going like hell.

    It just seems it like you understand a little bit then the next day a little bit more. I haven't experience a big leap of understanding certainly I did during A levels.

    If only I was like House.

    P.S. I read on Terrence Tao blog it gets worse when the maths gets harder.
    P.P.S. Damn, you functions of finite subsets.
    P.P.P.S. I'm in two minds of whether I should carry on self studying during the summer holiday. Its bloody hard and so that could be argued that I should stop now because of that, but its probably better to understand now instead of later at uni where I will be tested on it.


    It's absolutely great that you're teaching yourself this stuff already, I am certain that it will pay off. Sure, at University you'll be given everything you need, but by reading thoroughly on the subject before hand you are giving yourself a huge advantage. You might not notice how much better you're getting now, and may often feel uninspired and even think you're wasting your time, but I assure you that, after time, you'll realise it's worth it.

    It's not specific to maths - practise practise practise! But never practise badly, that is, if you're feeling uninspired and maybe not concentrating, then you really should take a break and come back when you're ready.
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    (Original post by Phugoid)
    Well I don't for one minute think anybody should waste their summer sitting in front of the TV. That's not good.

    During my summer holidays, here's some of the things I do:

    I read books for LEISURE ! :O During the semester, I don't get much chance to read a book that isn't uni related, and that means studying it, not just reading it. When uni finishes, I abandon those books and head for something different. Sometimes I still read maths books, but popular science maths books, or mathematical philosophy - something I can read at leisure, without having to absorb it all to a scholarly extent. Read fiction. Read some books outwith your subject area - you must be interested in more than maths.

    Get a project going! Restore a car, write and record an album, build something fun from scratch. Something DIY, but innovative, and fun.

    Go some day trips with a good book. It's not always ***** weather.

    Join a gym. No need to let your health suffer due to the weather.

    It can be hard to teach yourself mathematics. It's one of the hardest things to self-teach I'd say. Anything technical is difficult to self-teach. I self-teach myself, more or less, but I can't do it during summer. I don't attend lectures and rarely ask for the help of a tutor, but just being at uni gives you a structure to your learning, and sometimes, structure is all you need to battle through it. A lack of structure and structural guidance during the summer is what stops me in my tracks.

    As for inspiration, I'd suggest all of the above. Take up a new hobby, and you'll find mathematics in it somewhere. Doesn't matter whether it's a sport, or just reading, going nature walks, trips to the zoo, etc. You will find mathematics somewhere, and it will provoke questions for you. Doing maths for the sake of doing maths isn't much inspiring in itself. It's once you see it at work in the world that you get that inspiration injection.

    I have inspiration about uni maths.

    Yes, it is possible to get inspired by uni maths. It's so much more than just a 'series of deductions', but to see past that, you need context. And you will get that context from other areas of your life, other areas of observation.

    This!!!
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    Stop making threads and teaching yourself maths you'll be taught again in a month or two and go outside.
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    No Simplicity, keep trying!!!
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    i think you should start running again simpy.
 
 
 
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