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    For it.
    I like the current structure that we have.
    I dunno about other schools, though.
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    A school wants people to 1. do well in their A-levels, and 2. prepare them for university education.

    Under the current system these become conflicting objectives. Since exams are specific in their marking, having to really think is simply not necessary. Most syllabuses can be reduced to point/counterpoint. And what's the best way to teach those? Spoonfeeding. Dry and systematic lessons which stays rigidly within the syllabus with a strong focus on the exam.

    Solves 1 but what about 2? Well for 2 you want people to become independent and passionate about their subjects. That means setting research homeworks and going outside the syllabus. But wait other schools are spoonfeeding their pupils so I want to be spoonfed too. Moreso, I don't want to go outside the syllabus. The more 'stuff to impress the examiner' you teach, the further you go from the markscheme.

    Fortunately, it gets a lot better at university.

    Here's where we keep the homeworks. Up to you to get them and complete before the due date.
    If you don't do the homeworks we'll block you from the exams.
    If you're getting bad marks, we can offer you all the help you need. But you're the one who has to initiate.
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    (Original post by Sports Racer)
    A school wants people to 1. do well in their A-levels, and 2. prepare them for university education.

    Under the current system these become conflicting objectives. Since exams are specific in their marking, having to really think is simply not necessary. Most syllabuses can be reduced to point/counterpoint. And what's the best way to teach those? Spoonfeeding. Dry and systematic lessons which stays rigidly within the syllabus with a strong focus on the exam.

    Solves 1 but what about 2? Well for 2 you want people to become independent and passionate about their subjects. That means setting research homeworks and going outside the syllabus. But wait other schools are spoonfeeding their pupils so I want to be spoonfed too. Moreso, I don't want to go outside the syllabus. The more 'stuff to impress the examiner' you teach, the further you go from the markscheme.

    Fortunately, it gets a lot better at university.

    Here's where we keep the homeworks. Up to you to get them and complete before the due date.
    If you don't do the homeworks we'll block you from the exams.
    If you're getting bad marks, we can offer you all the help you need. But you're the one who has to initiate.
    Now that's a good system! :yes:
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    Pro school because without it children wouldn't have something to focus on and it would be detrimental to development. School gives rise for opportunities such as associating with others, personality development and development of knowledge etc. I suppose education is what I'm for, not the school system.
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    I'm pro-school, but I'm anti-exams.

    In my opinion I can write a perfectly good essay - I have friends that get amazed when they read my essays and we're all at the same kind of level in English (we're all in the top group). But just because I don't write in a strict PEE structure I drop marks, it really annoys me. I don't care for the PEE structure, it's dull and predictable, but you can't do anything different to it because that would be wrong.

    I am one of those people who decides to do something different to everyone else, this means in some subjects I get the opportunity to shine (ie. IT), but in others I get criticised for not writing EXACTLY what the teacher said, word for word.

    I'm in favour of the current schooling system because we have the grouping system, and the 2 year system. But when 30 or so people are put in a group with completely different levels of knowledge (as happened in IT), it just doesn't work.
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    I'm pro school even if it does seem to be the worst place on earth at times:o:

    Without it a lot of people won't be as successful as they are and well interacting with other children gives a lot of kids social skills that stick for life aswell as a typical education. However I think it should be restructured more to ability than strict ages :yes:
 
 
 
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