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About to turn 17 - How to keep the costs down? Watch

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    Hiya all,

    I need some advice which should be relevant to quite a few people on here. Sadly, my plans to get a job throughout the summer have failed and it's left me with limited (Overstatment!) funds. Problem is, I wanted to use the revenue from the summer job to learn to drive in September, when I turn 17. What would be the cheapest way of learning?

    BACKGROUND INFO:
    I live in a rural area (I think it's the safest for insurers) and my parents drive (and are experienced so could teach me the vast majority) - However the car they drive is a Toyota Avensis GS 1.8 VVTi (2001 model) petrol and it's insurance class 9 so I'm unsure if an insurer would let me learn using that vehicle.

    Any help that you could give me would be greatly appreciated.
    Many thanks.
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    Just to mention, your parents might be awesome drivers, but they most likely won't be able to teach you how to pass today's test. I'd get some lessons, and add to this some private practise of what you've learned with them, then you'll come along much quicker
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    first and foremost if you want to keep your lessons to a minimum then make sure you can operate the controls perfectly and know nearly everything about driving on public roads. then all the driving instructor has to do is make sure you are polished enough for the examiner to mark you off.

    it staggers belief when people start learning with an instructor about how to use the clutch and turn the steering wheel! all that takes is practice and that can be done for free in your parents car.
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    Adding yourself to your parents policy will not be that costly as your parents own the car and probably have a bucketful of NCD. Only cost £80ish to be added to my parents for the year which didn't increase after I passed.
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    Group nine will be fine.
    My first car was a 14.
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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    it staggers belief when people start learning with an instructor about how to use the clutch and turn the steering wheel! all that takes is practice and that can be done for free in your parents car.
    But my parents wouldn't let me use their car :sad:
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    well u gotta buy a car or learn in an instrucers car then...

    u can still read the highway code prior to learning, take notice of how your parents drive (although they WILL have bad habits) and see how they/you should respond to conditions on the road.

    operating the car isn't hard, it's the responding to other drivers and conditions that takes practice...
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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    it staggers belief when people start learning with an instructor about how to use the clutch and turn the steering wheel! all that takes is practice and that can be done for free in your parents car.
    Yep agreed, if your parent's can't teach you the basics and how to use the controls, I suggest you buy this CD-ROM.

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    (Original post by Lara C.)
    it staggers belief when people start learning with an instructor about how to use the clutch and turn the steering wheel! all that takes is practice and that can be done for free in your parents car.
    Given the cost of insuring a 17-year-old to drive in a parent's car, it's probably far cheaper to learn in an instructor's car.
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    maybe just use the bus?
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    (Original post by tommm)
    Given the cost of insuring a 17-year-old to drive in a parent's car, it's probably far cheaper to learn in an instructor's car.
    This.
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    If your not using your parents car then learning to drive won't be cheap but living in a rural area(as I do. 40 mins from the deen) then you will need to learn so just be prepared to spend money on it.
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    (Original post by tommm)
    Given the cost of insuring a 17-year-old to drive in a parent's car, it's probably far cheaper to learn in an instructor's car.
    You dont need to be on the insurance to learn how to use the clutch and steeringwheel, that can be done on the driveway, or better still a private car park or something.
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    (Original post by lee_91)
    well u gotta buy a car or learn in an instrucers car then...

    u can still read the highway code prior to learning, take notice of how your parents drive (although they WILL have bad habits) and see how they/you should respond to conditions on the road.

    operating the car isn't hard, it's the responding to other drivers and conditions that takes practice...
    VERY bad advice. Once you pass your test, there will be a lot of things that you do in lessons you will never do again. You are NOT being taught to drive as such, are you being taught how to pass a test.
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    how is taking notice of how an experienced driver reacts to situatiuons bad advice?
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    Basically mate, you need to add 10 years to your age and don't drive like a tw*t!!!

    It's always going to be expensive for new drivers! Thats why insurance companies get to know you're ability and level of sensibility by using the No Claims Discount system!

    Catagory 9 insurance isn't anything to worry about to much... I've just sold 2 catagory 20 High powered Jap imports (Skyline R33 GTR V-Spec and 200SX S14A both highly modified and dyno tuned, both WELL over 400bhp! ) to fund Uni...

    Best of luck anyway little dude! You'll get lower costs as you get older....
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    (Original post by Shifty6Speed)
    Basically mate, you need to add 10 years to your age and don't drive like a tw*t!!!

    It's always going to be expensive for new drivers! Thats why insurance companies get to know you're ability and level of sensibility by using the No Claims Discount system!

    Catagory 9 insurance isn't anything to worry about to much... I've just sold 2 catagory 20 High powered Jap imports (Skyline R33 GTR V-Spec and 200SX S14A both highly modified and dyno tuned, both WELL over 400bhp! ) to fund Uni...

    Best of luck anyway little dude! You'll get lower costs as you get older....
    Haha! Thanks for the advice there
 
 
 
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