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    hey ... for engineering degree in top unis like mit cambridge oxford princeton harvard,

    taking further maths in Alvl is essential right?

    but if dint managed to score an A for further maths???

    :eek:
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    I think most do prefer further maths, but it isn't essential.
    Essentials

    All Colleges require Maths and Physics A-levels for admission to read Engineering. Chemistry is also required for admission to read Chemical Engineering via the Engineering route. (There is an alternative route to Chemical Engineering via Natural Sciences.)

    The document Maths for Engineering: Notes for School Teachers gives advice to help applicants choose a suitable A-level Maths course and options within that course. This is available on-line or from the Teaching Office ([email protected]).
    Third A-Levels

    As you can see in Table 1, all Colleges prefer applicants to be studying three Science/Maths A-levels. Suitable subjects for your third A-level include (in alphabetical order) Chemistry, Computer Science, Electronics, Design & Technology and Further Maths. Special comments are required about Further Maths and Design & Technology A-levels.

    Table 1 might seem to indicate that if you are not doing Further Maths there are very few Colleges that might admit you. This is far from the truth. In practice, about a third of the students admitted to study Engineering at Cambridge have not done Further Maths. What Colleges are looking for is high ability in mathematics. Colleges are aware that not all schools offer Further Maths A-level, and will not discriminate against applicants who have not had the opportunity to take it. However, if your school or college is able to offer Further Maths, you are strongly encouraged to study this. If Further Maths is not available or you have recognised its desirability too late, we would advise you to do as much additional pure maths and mechanics as possible, e.g. by taking standalone modules or Further Maths AS-level. If offered by your school/college, you might also consider taking STEP or AEA Maths.

    The recent experience of Colleges is that some Design & Technology A-level courses are excellent and provide engineering students with a very worthwhile introduction to the subject, while other courses are of very limited benefit. Potential applicants doing Design & Technology are advised to consult with their prospective College about the acceptability of the course they are doing.
    http://www.eng.cam.ac.uk/admissions/...uirements.html
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    It depends on the individual uni, read to prospectus, some want full further maths, some only want As, good luck
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    You have the perfect set of subjects for engineering (if you take further maths, so go for it), good luck.
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    The typical offer for University is AAA. Therefore if you are doing 4 subjects you could get an A in your 3 other subjects but not Further Maths, and still get in. However, sometimes Universities stipulate what the 3 A grades must be in and they could say Further Maths is one of them. You could contact the universities to ask them what their policies are.
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    US universities don't really care about A levels other than your predictions. For Harvard, Princeton and other US schools you'd have to take SAT subject tests, probably in maths and physics.
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    It's probably better to do Further Maths, but only if you could do well in it.
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    (Original post by impervious)
    I think most do prefer further maths, but it isn't essential.

    http://www.eng.cam.ac.uk/admissions/...uirements.html

    erm... i read that article before... ya..... we need to have good performance in others aspect.. too.

    in case of i want to do chemical engineering in the future??

    is fm still considered as a must-do or perhaps "may needed"??
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    (Original post by 19becky91)
    It depends on the individual uni, read to prospectus, some want full further maths, some only want As, good luck

    my college here doesnt offer AS furthermaths gce a-lvl. they offer A2 fm only..

    *it depends on the individual uni>> to gather this information is quite hard isnt..
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    I feel Further Maths, maths, physics, chemistry is perfect for engineering anywhere

    You are dreading Maths but if you choose the right modules further maths is not that much harder than maths....and the advantage of doing further maths is that you are revising two subjects at a time so working on such algebra in fp1 can help with c2 and such.

    Also, IMO fp1 (edexcel) is easier than c2 and that's the only compulsory module for further maths AS, so if you're doing maths AS (which I feel is a must) then that could be slightly harder than further maths AS if you choose the right modules

    I would strongly suggest you to pick those four subjects, especially for engineering
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    Unfortunately I have no experience with "top universities" as I had no intention of attending one. Do you have a different fourth subject choice? Otherwise I can only assume it will be very useful to gaining entry, and since engineering is apparently very maths orientated then it should also be useful to you.
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    (Original post by CocoPop)
    US universities don't really care about A levels other than your predictions. For Harvard, Princeton and other US schools you'd have to take SAT subject tests, probably in maths and physics.

    the standardized exam test?

    we need to have foundation of a-lvl maths and physic to do SAT rite?

    so SAT is needed if applying for us unis...
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    (Original post by tsrhow)
    my college here doesnt offer AS furthermaths gce a-lvl. they offer A2 fm only..

    *it depends on the individual uni>> to gather this information is quite hard isnt..

    Well no university will see FM as a bad thing, and some will see it as a good thing. If you are aiming for "top" universities, I would say it's very wise to do it.
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    (Original post by ily_em)
    The typical offer for University is AAA. Therefore if you are doing 4 subjects you could get an A in your 3 other subjects but not Further Maths, and still get in. However, sometimes Universities stipulate what the 3 A grades must be in and they could say Further Maths is one of them. You could contact the universities to ask them what their policies are.

    that means, 3 A must be there> phy, maths, chem. is the basic minimum requirement..

    fm can become a credit bonus for it....

    but beside that, what aspect swill those unis looking into?

    do they really looking into the extra curricular activity?

    i think tranditional uni or those top unis look at 95% academic
    4% extracurricular activities
    1% others....
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    ermmm..

    thats means if i do fm, i must get A...

    and.. if i score b or maybe c in FM, is it still benifits?
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    (Original post by Jonty99)
    It's probably better to do Further Maths, but only if you could do well in it.

    erm....
    ya... thats is right...

    MIT chemical engineering nice ?or not?
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    (Original post by tsrhow)
    the standardized exam test?

    we need to have foundation of a-lvl maths and physic to do SAT rite?

    so SAT is needed if applying for us unis...
    Yes, you will need to take the SAT I, which consists of 10 sections split between Critical Reading, Writing and Maths. The maths is quite simple in this and only really goes up to basic geometry.

    You then need to take the SAT II Subject Tests. Some big top engineering universities such as MIT, Stanford and Berkeley only require 2 subject tests whilst other ivies such as Harvard require 3. There are 2 possible maths subject tests you can take - Math I and Math II. The difference is that in Math I the topics are much easier, however your score will drop more significantly due to a very harsh curve, whereas in Math II the curve is more generous, allowing you to get a few wrong and still get top marks (800), but the maths is a lot harder.

    Universities tend to prefer Math II, although you should check their website because many are still fine with Math I. However, if taking Math II, I suggest you check through the topics to see if there's anything you haven't covered at A level.

    The physics subject test may also have a few topics you haven't covered, so check through the syllabus. A level maths and physics would be good foundations for this, but take a practice test or two to see where you're losing marks.

    Good luck
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    (Original post by tsrhow)
    that means, 3 A must be there> phy, maths, chem. is the basic minimum requirement..

    fm can become a credit bonus for it....

    but beside that, what aspect swill those unis looking into?

    do they really looking into the extra curricular activity?

    i think tranditional uni or those top unis look at 95% academic
    4% extracurricular activities
    1% others....
    MIT, Princeton and Harvard put a LOT of emphasis on extracurricular activities

    The reason is that everyone applying to those schools already have great grades and extracurriculars are what allows them to pick out the best candidates.

    Not so much for Oxbridge - they only really care about academics.
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    FMaths isn't even essential to doing a pure maths degree at Oxbridge. obviously it helps, but it isn't crucial
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    (Original post by Nytram12)
    FMaths isn't even essential to doing a pure maths degree at Oxbridge. obviously it helps, but it isn't crucial
    Well it'll be a disadvantage if you don't do it.
 
 
 
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