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    How do you pronounce coméis and miráis?

    Thanks!
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    I don´t know if you want the phonetic translation (if so i can´t help)

    But you pronounce coméis like com-ace
    and miráis like mir-ice
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    (Original post by AntiMonarchist)
    I don´t know if you want the phonetic translation (if so i can´t help)

    But you pronounce coméis like com-ace
    and miráis like mir-ice
    I'm (very) sure that the above is right. :yes:
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    (Original post by TheMeister)
    I'm (very) sure that the above is right. :yes:
    I'm certain the above of the above is right :yep:
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    Ah Thank you so much! I had no idea what it was!
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    I did Spanish GCSE .. its definitely...

    pronounced like comey-es and miray-is

    are the two words to do with eating and looking btw?
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    (Original post by AntiMonarchist)
    I don´t know if you want the phonetic translation (if so i can´t help)

    But you pronounce coméis like com-ace
    and miráis like mir-ice
    This is right
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    (Original post by paniking_and_not_revising)
    How do you pronounce coméis and miráis?

    Thanks!
    Hmmm the other offered translations aren't bad but they really aren't native perfect.

    Com - aze

    Mi - raise

    Much better me thinky! :p:
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    (Original post by KayleeLand)
    Hmmm the other offered translations aren't bad but they really aren't native perfect.

    Com - aze

    Mi - raise

    Much better me thinky! :p:

    Not really. The z in the first one is particularly misleading because the s is not voiced as a z would be (it's pronounced like the s in sake).

    The -éis and -aís endings both have two sounds in them, basically if you know how the spanish letters should sound just say everything you see.

    -éis consists of e (almost like like the vowel in "bare", but a bit higher), i (like the vowel in "meet"), and s (as in sake).

    -áis is the same, except the first sound is a like the vowel in "bat".

    Obviously you say the vowels pretty quickly after one another so they sound almost like one sound, but they're definitely both there...
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    (Original post by Happiness)
    Not really. The z in the first one is particularly misleading because the s is not voiced as a z would be (it's pronounced like the s in sake).
    It is 'voiced' as the 'z' in 'amaze' is actually.
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    (Original post by KayleeLand)
    It is 'voiced' as the 'z' in 'amaze' is actually.
    Really? I always pronounced as an "s" - it was good enough for GCSE.
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    (Original post by alessiocerci)
    Really? I always pronounced as an "s" - it was good enough for GCSE.
    Because the 'z' isn't a hard 'z'. It's blended and softer than the letter alone. Yeh no-one has perfect GCSE pronounciation - I have kids in my class saying 'azul' literally.

    I believe that brutish pronounciation helps to lose the mother tongue accent in a non-native environment.
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    (Original post by KayleeLand)
    It is 'voiced' as the 'z' in 'amaze' is actually.
    No it isn't. Check http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjT4qPbm5Sk for just one example.
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    (Original post by Happiness)
    No it isn't. Check http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjT4qPbm5Sk for just one example.
    I am not getting into an argument with you about this. You think one way, I think another. But for the record, the Spanish 's' is never pronounced as an English 's' or even 'c'. Another example - 'quieres' being 'key-air-ez'.
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    (Original post by KayleeLand)
    I am not getting into an argument with you about this. You think one way, I think another. But for the record, the Spanish 's' is never pronounced as an English 's' or even 'c'. Another example - 'quieres' being 'key-air-ez'.

    I don't want an argument, if you can actually provide some proof that you're right then I'll gladly listen to you.

    If a consonant is voiced then it means your vocal chords should be working as you say it (you will be able to feel them in your throat). The s, at the end of a word such as quieres, is not voiced. It may undergo slight voicing as a result of the preceeding vowels however it will be a [strike] rather than a [z].

    http://books.google.com/books?id=w3G...ciation&pg=PA4


    and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish...Phonetic_notes

    "/θ/, /s/,[20] and /f/[21] become voiced before voiced consonants as in jazmín ('Jasmine') [xaðˈmĩn], rasgo ('feature') [ˈrazɣo̞], and Afganistán [avɣãnisˈtãn]."

    Basically states that /s/ is only voiced in one position; before other voiced consonants.
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    (Original post by Happiness)
    The s, at the end of a word such as quieres, is not voiced. It may undergo slight voicing as a result of the preceeding vowels however it will be a [strike] rather than a [z].
    It will be a soft 'z' as I have already said. This is not French we are discussing. I have provided English pronouciation of Spanish words, which should not be done, however does help in the early stages of learning. No 's' is not always said as a 'z' - but as with all Spanish letters it is most definitely voiced!
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    (Original post by KayleeLand)
    It will be a soft 'z' as I have already said. This is not French we are discussing. I have provided English pronouciation of Spanish words, which should not be done, however does help in the early stages of learning. No 's' is not always said as a 'z' - but as with all Spanish letters it is most definitely voiced!
    "As with all spanish letters it is most definitely voiced".

    Spanish letters are not all voiced. A 'letter' does not need to be voiced for it to still be sounded. As I said before the difference between voiced/unvoiced is whether the vocal chords are working. E.g. "zoo" has a voiced [z] at the beginning, "sue" has an unvoiced [strike].

    In one of your other posts you also said that "s" in spanish is never pronounced as in English, which also makes no sense. Nevermind at the end of a word, in a word such as Sí the s is pretty much exactly as it would be in the english word Sun.

    It would sound very odd to deliberately try and pronounce the s of -aís as a z as in amaze. It also makes absolutely no sense that -éis should be pronounced with an [strike] and -áis with a [z], what even provokes that variation?
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    I pronounce azul as ath-ool and acera as ath-eer-a.

    I use ceceo. Do you guys use seseo then?

    I'm friends with some Spanish people on facebook, I'll just ask them the correct way of saying éis and áis.
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    (Original post by paniking_and_not_revising)
    I pronounce azul as ath-ool and acera as ath-eer-a.

    I use ceceo. Do you guys use seseo then?

    I'm friends with some Spanish people on facebook, I'll just ask them the correct way of saying éis and áis.
    Yeh you may as well though I'm not sure that they'll know how to put it in English letters. But as I said before you should try learning the alphabet and not rely on changing letters in your head, like the 'll' to 'y' thingymajig. You can use www.livemocha.com for pronounciation if you've got a microphone - natives help and correct you on there.
 
 
 

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