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Is The Concept of Having "Countries" Dying out?? Watch

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    I don't think countries have ever had this golden heyday that this thread seems to be harking back to. The sovereignty of countries and their artificial natures have always been well-known: we trundled from imperialism to an overbearing concept of Christendom then back to imperialism again - which only really ended in the 1960s. Now we have international co-operation through the likes of NATO, the EU, the UN etc.

    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Those people who want open borders and complete freedom to live where you wish will have good reason over the coming decades to be grateful for the fact that they live on an island in a temperate zone and in a rich country with strong political infrastructure. As populations seek to move around to avoid the effects of global warming, overpopulation, religious zealotry and corrupt governments, you might be glad you are able to prove your right to live in the UK and that others can be kept out.
    Simply being self-serving is not, in itself, an adequate political philosophy.

    (Original post by jakemittle)
    I like countries!..lets keep countries!...its something that can give us identity!
    I don't need some bureaucrat to tell me that I am British. I am also Scottish - and Scotland as a country/state hasn't existed in over three centuries... yet still, here I am.

    ...It probably will, I mean, it seems with the Lisbon Treaty that it will essentally make Europe like a country
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    (Original post by Sharpshooter)

    I recognise the polls on an "EU Supersate", "immigration" on here, and the support is increasingly higher for each time I look at them it seems. I mean most people I know support socialism, support globalisation and don't feel British or English as much the average England footy fan does. I was talking to one of my friends about the world cup and England and said he would "never support" England as he doesn't believe in the concept of countries (this is what drove me to make this thread).

    Do people feel as nationalistic as ever still or is there some truth in my post that nationalism is dying out and that we're going to live as "one" eventually?
    TSR is not representative of the public. TSR seems more leftwing than "real life".

    I know only one person who supports socialism and I've never heard anyone say they don't support the concept of countries.

    I'm not trying to say people don't feel that countries are unnecessary, but I don't think that feeling is as widespread as you believe.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Simply being self-serving is not, in itself, an adequate political philosophy.
    Neverthless, it is the primary reason for forming a nation state. The main duty of any government is to protect its citizens from the outside world. After that comes trade, and after that helping others.
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    In reality Multinationals such as Glaxo and Goldman Sachs have more clout than most countries in the world. They are taking on the role that the former big imperial powers once were.

    Nationalism is if anything on the increase owing to the economic global struggle. Competition in society becomes stronger and those that are perceived as outsiders become a target for the marginalised.
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    No thank you. I’d rather not live in a One World Government where billions of people on the other side of the world could dictate the politics in my life.
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    (Original post by Anony mouse)
    No thank you. I’d rather not live in a One World Government where billions of people on the other side of the world could dictate the politics in my life.
    But the politics in your life are already being dictated by millions of people that probably don't have that much in common with you and live quite far away. A few thousand years ago in Britain, people would have thought the same about being ruled by people a few miles away. But now we accept that the whole island gets a say in politics. The USA is even bigger with even more people, yet they don't see to have a problem with people on the other side of the continent having a say.

    A one world government isn't really that different, it's just what we have already scaled up.
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    A one world government isn't really that different, it's just what we have already scaled up.
    But someone the other side of Britain is likely to have more in common with you than someone who lives in Ethiopia, Sudan, China or Bangladesh.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    But someone the other side of Britain is likely to have more in common with you than someone who lives in Ethiopia, Sudan, China or Bangladesh.
    At this point in time yes. As I said, a few thousand years ago, people would have considered themselves to be very different from other tribes in Britain. Maybe we have very little in common with people from those countries, but we have quite a lot in common with say people from mainland Europe, Ireland, North America. I'm just saying that things change and over time and perceived differences between people separated by distance get smaller and smaller as the world gets smaller and smaller (metaphorically speaking).
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    The problem I have is with the current worlds population, 6.8 billion. It's projected to hit 7 billion in 3 years (2010), 8 billion, 9 billion then 10 billion possibly within 50 years.

    There's far too many people in the world, if are set for one world government how are we going to manage it with a world that size?
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    This is a great topic. I'd say yes. Maybe not in our youth or lifetime, but probably in a century or two, after some major war, like someone already said. We have never been this much globalised as in this decade. Faster cars, better roads, cheaper flights, richer countries (at least in Europe), the rise of the internet, the use of English as a world language. I think the EU has become very much country-like and will be even more as the century unfolds. Picture the UK, but bigger and more powerful.
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    We should have superstates. Eurabia / The Americas / East Asia
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    (Original post by Shadowplay)
    This is a great topic. I'd say yes. Maybe not in our youth or lifetime, but probably in a century or two, after some major war, like someone already said. We have never been this much globalised as in this decade. Faster cars, better roads, cheaper flights, richer countries (at least in Europe), the rise of the internet, the use of English as a world language. I think the EU has become very much country-like and will be even more as the century unfolds. Picture the UK, but bigger and more powerful.
    But do you not think it would be very boring if we all spoke English? All part of the same country, same everything. I envisage it turning into one large casino/disneyland otherwise.
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    (Original post by Sharpshooter)
    But do you not think it would be very boring if we all spoke English? All part of the same country, same everything. I envisage it turning into one large casino/disneyland otherwise.

    What I think about it doesn't mean anything... Of course it would be boring, but our grandparents probably think of internet as boring, because they used to call each other more often. Or they think of no border control as boring, because they used to have fun smuggling bananas under their shirts. It will probably have its ups and downs
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    History has shown that a world language has never materialised properly and I'm not sure it ever will. Although I do suscribe to the theory that there could be a nation state of some sort as we all are gradually coming together in the 21st century.
 
 
 
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