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    surprised no one has done this yet...

    dangers of the treadmill:
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    (Original post by Mr Halpert)
    Was told by my uneducated mother that using a treadmill makes you shorter?Is there any truth in it?
    Somewhat, marathon runners lose something like an inch in height during the course of the race.
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    It could result in a temporary height reduction (http://www.jospt.org/issues/articleI...cle_detail.asp). I don't know of any permanent effects and doubt that there are any.

    You might get some overuse injuries or muscle imbalances that could lead to injury due the repetitive nature. You should definitely rest occasionally. Cross-training might be worth considering if you can think of something you'd enjoy.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Somewhat, marathon runners lose something like an inch in height during the course of the race.
    But jogging 2 k a day surely wont have such an effect...
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    (Original post by yoshifumu)
    surprised no one has done this yet...

    dangers of the treadmill:
    Lol! Or this:

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    Shorter? :lolwut:I can't believe that, not unless it has a bloody chainsaw attached. Anybody that mentions runners being slightly shorter after a race, this is probably because they are simply standing up for 3 hours, and they will be back to normal the next day. The same happens to everyone, that's why everyone is slightly taller when they wake up in the morning, runners would get the same thing only exaggerated - due to the effect of this if you go into space long enough you supposedly grow 6 inches.

    I suppose this woman also believes that you can be killed by sleeping in a room with a fan left on? :rolleyes:
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    http://www.jospt.org/issues/articleI...cle_detail.asp

    Not that the effects are going to be permanent.
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    (Original post by Craig_D)
    Shorter? :lolwut:I can't believe that, not unless it has a bloody chainsaw attached. Anybody that mentions runners being slightly shorter after a race, this is probably because they are simply standing up for 3 hours, and they will be back to normal the next day. The same happens to everyone, that's why everyone is slightly taller when they wake up in the morning, runners would get the same thing only exaggerated - due to the effect of this if you go into space long enough you supposedly grow 6 inches.

    I suppose this woman also believes that you can be killed by sleeping in a room with a fan left on? :rolleyes:

    The space thing could also be due to the low pressure :eyeball:

    I don't think anything can be healthy if you lose an inch in height in one go though, even if you do slowly lose it during a day, marathon makes it much worse.

    that and it taking you around 2 weeks to recover, and being lose healthy then before you started the race after you fully recover.

    i never understood why people ran marathons. the guy who started it (from greece) ran to tell his general something the 28 miles (or is it KM i forget), told the general, then dropped dead. why would anyone want to replicate something that killed someone?

    Still shorter running is fine xD
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    (Original post by white_haired_wizard)
    Don't know about shorter...

    2kms takes you 13mins?

    Sure you're on maximum speed?

    Running is high impact, which I'm sure you're aware of. Less impact would be something like rowing, cycling or swimming.
    You call rowing low impact? O.o
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    You call rowing low impact? O.o
    on the joints, when compared to, say, running, yes I would.
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    (Original post by white_haired_wizard)
    on the joints, when compared to, say, running, yes I would.
    Have you ever rowed?
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    Have you ever rowed?
    I've done alot of running in my time and I've rowed, albeit on a rower in a gym. I've had shin splints on a couple of occasions because of running and you can really feel it on the knees if you haven't done much running in a while.

    I struggle to believe the impact on the joints is similar to that on the joints when running, less weight exerted on the knees for instance.

    Prove me wrong then fine, I'm mistaken.
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    Have you ever rowed?
    Compare the number of runners with shin splints with rowers. 'Nuff said.
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    (Original post by *Katie*)
    Compare the number of runners with shin splints with rowers. 'Nuff said.
    Isn't that often from falls though? And I never said it was the same impact as running, I was just saying it wasn't low impact.
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    Have you ever rowed?
    he's right.

    although rowing could be more intense or harder on the MUSCLES, it's not on the joints.

    Considering your feet are constantly in place, and don;t move off the pedal/floor whatever its called, you don't get the 'legs slamming into the ground every half second' effect. as aresult rowing is VERY low impact on the joints.
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    (Original post by JoeTSR)
    Isn't that often from falls though? And I never said it was the same impact as running, I was just saying it wasn't low impact.
    No. It's from the impact of your feet on the ground. And it is total agony.
    Rowing is low impact. I row (and used to do it competitively) and I used to be a sprinter.
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    (Original post by yoshifumu)
    he's right.

    although rowing could be more intense or harder on the MUSCLES, it's not on the joints.

    Considering your feet are constantly in place, and don;t move off the pedal/floor whatever its called, you don't get the 'legs slamming into the ground every half second' effect. as aresult rowing is VERY low impact on the joints.
    (Original post by *Katie*)
    No. It's from the impact of your feet on the ground. And it is total agony.
    Rowing is low impact. I row (and used to do it competitively) and I used to be a sprinter.

    kk, fair points guys, I've changed my opinions.
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    It's one of the reasons I've completely given up jogging and running, and the only jogging and sprinting I do do is when I'm playing tennis and badminton. When I can have an excellent cardio workout via cycling, swimming or on a rower in the gym, why should I put my joints at risk through running?! There's no need, and after 5 years of regular road-running and using a treadmill, I became increasingly bored ****less of running. Doubt I'll ever do a marathon now tbh. Done 10ks and a half-marathon...
 
 
 
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