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Why don't you want to do nursing instead? watch

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    (Original post by Jamie)
    Nurses can prescribe - but only under VERY strict guidelines/tick boxes. Only a limited amount of medications too.

    Nurses can lead teams...of nurses/HCAs. Not doctors. And again, they do so under supervision. All walk in centres have a doctor overseeing matters.
    Nurses who have done the prescribers course can prescribe (theoretically) anything from the BNF. In practice (and this applies to doctors too) they can only prescribe from the PCT's guideline (i.e.- the medicines that are paid for by the PCT). There are strict guidelines for prescribing for all healthcare professionals, including doctors, and nurses can prescribe the same amount as doctors.

    With first had experience of the day-to-day running of a Walk-in centre, the nurses are top dog. There may be a doctor there (usually only for a couple of hours, sometimes there are no doctors on), but these doctors are not "supervising" the nurses- they are there in case their expertise or opinion is sought after by one of the nursing staff. The doctor is not overseeing them, not signing anything off- just seeing patients.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    its both, degree from 2010.

    im only going to give one teeny correction, whats your idea of 'basic level of detail' and what do you think nurses learn in terms of anatomy and physiology? Ive just had a gander at my 2nd year modules, and..it's not pretty!
    I'n working my way through this thread, but if this hasn't been answered yet my questioning various nurses thus far would suggest next to no anatomy and physiology is learnt.
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    (Original post by Nhala)
    Nurses and doctors are just as vital, both just as hard-working (my mum worked as a nurse in both Adult and General, and is now an Assistant Director- she should know). I have the brains to do a medicine degree, there is no doubt about that, but I would rather be a nurse and work my way up in the NHS managerial-sector after I have had sufficient experience as a nurse. Just because you are a nurse, it does not mean that you do not have the brains to be a doctor, nor that you cannot work you way up and be equally successful. I am training to be a Mental Health nurse, rather than Adult.

    lol your the first student nurse i've heard of with aspirations to work in the managerial sector!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I want to avoid that as much as possible lol
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    (Original post by terpineol)
    I'n working my way through this thread, but if this hasn't been answered yet my questioning various nurses thus far would suggest next to no anatomy and physiology is learnt.
    well, thats not true..the degree is in thirds, evidence based pratice, clinical skills..and then anatomy and physiology, with a higher weighting in second and third year, first year is pretty basic really, just giving a grasping of anatomy, the systems etc....but its certainly not next to nothing, this has been a recent change, ie in the past 10 years there has been a much more influence of teaching A&P to nurses, i mean how can a nurse be expected to deliver appropiate care to a condition, without understanding how this has come about, how its affected, and the drug interactions..pharmacology etc?

    it sounds like you've been speaking to some of the old school nurses, but i do have to say that isn't true at all
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    lol your the first student nurse i've heard of with aspirations to work in the managerial sector!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I want to avoid that as much as possible lol
    I want to be something that is rare in my experience: a good manager. I want to be a manager, then hopefully be a director (we can dream), as I like to diversify the role I do and I like being a leader, but also like being a team member :rolleyes: . Not a **** though.:p:

    I may be a fool for these aspirations, but hey, fools can find gold.
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    (Original post by Nhala)
    I want to be something that is rare in my experience: a good manager. I want to be a manager, then hopefully be a director (we can dream), as I like to diversify the role I do and I like being a leader, but also like being a team member :rolleyes: . Not a **** though.:p:

    I may be a fool for these aspirations, but hey, fools can find gold.

    i spent a day with a nurse clinical lead, was fun..he was a good nurse, but had very little clinical contact infact he saw one patient, just to ask a question, tbh this is what i'd miss, i'd hate to be stuck at a desk, seeing little patients, making up policies..meetings etc
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    i spent a day with a nurse clinical lead, was fun..he was a good nurse, but had very little clinical contact infact he saw one patient, just to ask a question, tbh this is what i'd miss, i'd hate to be stuck at a desk, seeing little patients, making up policies..meetings etc
    I like both sides tbh, interaction and organisation. So think will want to progress naturally to this kind of job above, even if it is dull and you miss the interactions.

    Really do respect doctors, but I think nurses demand the same respect and do not like the egotistical view of SOME doctors that they are "better"...uh-uh. Most doctors are fine and polite though.
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    Nurses can prescribe - but only under VERY strict guidelines/tick boxes. Only a limited amount of medications too.

    Nurses can lead teams...of nurses/HCAs. Not doctors. And again, they do so under supervision. All walk in centres have a doctor overseeing matters.
    Nurses prescriptions have to be signed by a doctor, I think.
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    (Original post by AAAirz)
    Nurses prescriptions have to be signed by a doctor, I think.
    They don't. Also in 2006 they removed the restrictions on non-medical prescribing and pretty much opened the BNF (with exeption of some controlled drugs) . http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Healthcare/M...ing/DH_4123003
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    (Original post by Nhala)
    I like both sides tbh, interaction and organisation. So think will want to progress naturally to this kind of job above, even if it is dull and you miss the interactions.

    Really do respect doctors, but I think nurses demand the same respect and do not like the egotistical view of SOME doctors that they are "better"...uh-uh. Most doctors are fine and polite though.

    ooo blasphemy, are you st/n atm or applying? join the Nurses soc on here
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    (Original post by AAAirz)
    Nurses prescriptions have to be signed by a doctor, I think.

    nooo, think you're confused with drug charts
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    nooo, think you're confused with drug charts
    When I got a prescription from the nurse for some eczema related medicine, a doctor had to sign it before i could use it.
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    (Original post by Nhala)
    I like both sides tbh, interaction and organisation. So think will want to progress naturally to this kind of job above, even if it is dull and you miss the interactions.

    Really do respect doctors, but I think nurses demand the same respect and do not like the egotistical view of SOME doctors that they are "better"...uh-uh. Most doctors are fine and polite though.

    In all seriousness, can we save the drs vs. nurses things for another thread? It's been quite interesting so far. :yes:
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    (Original post by Sarky)
    In all seriousness, can we save the drs vs. nurses things for another thread? It's been quite interesting so far. :yes:

    i think she was only joking! lighten up :p:
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    (Original post by AAAirz)
    When I got a prescription from the nurse for some eczema related medicine, a doctor had to sign it before i could use it.

    well maybe she wasn't a nurse prescriber? im not too sure about this, anyone know if nurses can write up prescriptions, but all the doctors do is sign?
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    Nurses and doctors have completely differing roles in the NHS. I made a choice based on which role I thought suited me best as an individual.

    This is a tricky question, though. Many nurses would be offended if every medic here gave a totally honest opinion.
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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    Nurses and doctors have completely differing roles in the NHS. I made a choice based on which role I thought suited me best as an individual.

    This is a tricky question, though. Many nurses would be offended if every medic here gave a totally honest opinion.
    depends, i totally agree with your reason, as at the end of the day thats why i went into nursing.

    I think it gets offensive when there is inaccurate info going around (ie nurses learn next to nothing A&P!) but dw we get it..medicine = money,status..respect...not having to wipe arses daily lol
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    depends, i totally agree with your reason, as at the end of the day thats why i went into nursing.

    I think it gets offensive when there is inaccurate info going around (ie nurses learn next to nothing A&P!) but dw we get it..medicine = money,status..respect...not having to wipe arses daily lol
    There is no doubting that, socially and politically, medicine is seen somehow being "better" than nursing.

    The reality is irrelevant, but the point is, this question in an interview is there to see if the candidate recognises the importance of teamwork in today's approach to medicine.

    I think asking here, in the Medicine forum, was just going to cause arguments if ANYONE gave a completely honest answer :p:.

    One might ask the opposite question: Why be a nurse if you can be a doctor?
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    (Original post by Demon_AS)
    There is no doubting that, socially and politically, medicine is seen somehow being "better" than nursing.

    The reality is irrelevant, but the point is, this question in an interview is there to see if the candidate recognises the importance of teamwork in today's approach to medicine.

    I think asking here, in the Medicine forum, was just going to cause arguments if ANYONE gave a completely honest answer :p:.

    One might ask the opposite question: Why be a nurse if you can be a doctor?
    well exactly, i got asked that exact question myself and it threw me, i wasn't expected to be told 'you have good grades, are clearly intelligent, do you consider yourself too good to be a nurse and should be in medicine?' - it was a tough one, i think my answer was, if i wanted to be a doctor, i'd have applied for medicine, but the fact i'm here today shows my dedication and understanding of nursing because....

    this thread was destined for arguments, but i think it has gone better than expected? or am i being idealistic lol

    Im still undecided on the issue around people going into nursing to get into graduate medicine, they seem to be the ones (i find on my own course) who are taking it less seriously, making comments (ie i dont need to be in this lecture...i did this at a-level chemistry) I dunno..i mean why waste 3 years, nhs money, to train for a profession you dont want to end up in?
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    well exactly, i got asked that exact question myself and it threw me, i wasn't expected to be told 'you have good grades, are clearly intelligent, do you consider yourself too good to be a nurse and should be in medicine?' - it was a tough one, i think my answer was, if i wanted to be a doctor, i'd have applied for medicine, but the fact i'm here today shows my dedication and understanding of nursing because....

    this thread was destined for arguments, but i think it has gone better than expected? or am i being idealistic lol

    Im still undecided on the issue around people going into nursing to get into graduate medicine, they seem to be the ones (i find on my own course) who are taking it less seriously, making comments (ie i dont need to be in this lecture...i did this at a-level chemistry) I dunno..i mean why waste 3 years, nhs money, to train for a profession you dont want to end up in?
    I suppose there could be any number of reasons, really.

    But people very quickly forget the true purpose of the question, which, as I said, is about teamwork.

    I think everyone ought to remember that question doesn't ask whether one thinks medicine is better than nursing :p:.

    That's all I wanted to say, really .
 
 
 
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