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    (Original post by bottfly7)
    Nurses who have done the prescribers course can prescribe (theoretically) anything from the BNF. In practice (and this applies to doctors too) they can only prescribe from the PCT's guideline (i.e.- the medicines that are paid for by the PCT). There are strict guidelines for prescribing for all healthcare professionals, including doctors, and nurses can prescribe the same amount as doctors.
    Nope.
    There isn't a nurse job out there that allows them to prescribe any drug from the BNF or even PCT forumulary. Quite aside from all cytotoxic drugs which are immediately ruled out, just about every nurse job with precribing powers has a list of prescribable drugs.
    F1s have some limitations to precribing powers.

    F2s onwards tend to have none except for hardcore chemo drugs.

    (Original post by bottfly7)
    With first had experience of the day-to-day running of a Walk-in centre, the nurses are top dog. There may be a doctor there (usually only for a couple of hours, sometimes there are no doctors on), but these doctors are not "supervising" the nurses- they are there in case their expertise or opinion is sought after by one of the nursing staff. The doctor is not overseeing them, not signing anything off- just seeing patients.
    With first hand knowledge of walk in centre, GP and A&E I can tell you the nurse in the walk in centre is not 'top dog' and is supervised. They are not there 'just in case the nurse can't cope'. A supervisor does not mean someone sitting in on your consultations, nor does it mean you cannot be autonomous for 90% of workload.
    It does mean if theres something you can't handle that there is someone there to escalate to. All doctors upto consultant level have this form of supervison.

    You think nurses don't?
    I can't decide whether this is arrogance or ignorance...
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    Arrogance, I t seems to be something that runs rife with student nurses thinking they are the dogs bollcoks and all medics and Drs are arse holes who have ideas above thier station. I blame the older nurses on the wards with a chip on their shoulder. At the end of the day a Dr is senior to you so you do as you are told (within reason obviously) and unless you have real cause fro concern you should just get on with it. A Drs and a nurses job a so different its barely worth arguing about. If Drs wanted to wipe arses they would have been nurses, If nurses wanted to prescribe drugs and perform surgery they would have been Drs. :dontknow:
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    oh and also bc getting bulled by sister isn't my idea of fun.
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    (Original post by No Future)
    oh and also bc getting bulled by sister isn't my idea of fun.
    As if only nurses get bullied. Junior doctors are alos very likely to be victims of bullying. Both from their own seniors and other staff. In a recent survey 20% of junior doctors reported being bullied at some point in their current post.
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    (Original post by Sarky)
    In all seriousness, can we save the drs vs. nurses things for another thread? It's been quite interesting so far. :yes:
    Ooo, patronising! Can deffo see why your username is Sarky. However, I will not do as you say, as you did not ask nicely!:cool: In order to answer the question you have to slightly cover doctors vs. nurses anyhows, that is obvious, as a decision for a person who wanted to do medicine would have to weigh-up the pros and cons of both. I respect doctors as much as nurses tbh.
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    (Original post by Nhala)
    Ooo, patronising! Can deffo see why your username is Sarky. However, I will not do as you say, as you did not ask nicely!:cool: In order to answer the question you have to slightly cover doctors vs. nurses anyhows, that is obvious, as a decision for a person who wanted to do medicine would have to weigh-up the pros and cons of both. I respect doctors as much as nurses tbh.
    Patronising? Didn't ask nicely? :confused:

    Okolie dokolie.
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    (Original post by Boo.)
    They're both caring careers. Both in medicine obvs. Why not nursing? If you fail at medicine would you become a nurse?
    You probably didn't mean it to come across this way, but it sounds like you think nursing is for people who are too thick to be doctors. This is not the case at all, as all nurses are intelligent, and some probably could have been doctors if they wanted to be.

    I think it depends on the person because Doctors tend to have certain traits that others don't have, I can't explain it, but I think many people have the brains to be Doctors but not personalities to carry out the job, if that makes sense. I also think that some people who would make good Doctors could make terrible nurses.
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    I wouldn't want to be a doctor or a nurse. I love my job for being able to make sometimes a massive difference to someone in a short time, I love being the first person there in an emergency and I love not knowing what job is around the corner. I also love the problem solving that comes from having to try and think outside the box because the patient isn't the 'norm' or is in an odd position or is refusing to go to hospital when they really need to. I just don't think I'd get the same experience as either a doctor or a nurse plus I'd hate be to stuck in the same place all day.
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    I don't want to wipe old arse regularly.

    ...I just wanna poke my fingers up there.
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    you want to take more responsibility
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    (Original post by Nhala)
    Ooo, patronising! Can deffo see why your username is Sarky. However, I will not do as you say, as you did not ask nicely!:cool: In order to answer the question you have to slightly cover doctors vs. nurses anyhows, that is obvious, as a decision for a person who wanted to do medicine would have to weigh-up the pros and cons of both. I respect doctors as much as nurses tbh.
    :wtf: are you on about? How was that remotely patronising? It gets rapidly boring when people can't have an eloquent discussion involving doctors and nurses without it dissolving into a pathetic pissing contest.
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    (Original post by Entangled)
    I got this one in an interview in February. I just made a big point of doctors being a more significant point of communication (they basically relay all the information from the other teams - haemotology, pharmacy, etc. - to the patient).

    .
    you might say that i couldn't possibly comment ...
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    (Original post by lekky)
    <snip>
    * medicine = more responsibility
    how about considerably less responsibility, and until you are in a career grade post the ability to hide behind 'trainee' status ...
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    (Original post by It could be lupus)
    Ah bit this required the nurses to do specialist training to do these whereas you just need to so your degree in medicine. There is also restrictions to them as well
    there is no specialist training required to lead a team, in fact Nurses and AHPs leading teams are more likely to have a management qualification that Doctors leading teams.

    PGDs are functionally the same as prescribing from the point of view of the patient i.e. the are seen by a Professional and a medicine supplied and/or adminstered

    requesting investigations requires minimal additional training , primarily IR(ME)R training if you are going to be requesting Xrays


    the 'restrictions' on full formulary Nurse prescribers are minimal and mainly relate to Controlled drugs used OUTSIDE of Pain control , symptom relief or palliative care .

    other restrictions are regard the NMCs position on Nurse prescribers and unlicenced Medicines or mixtures of medicines
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    (Original post by Trigger)
    <snip> At the end of the day a Dr is senior to you so you do as you are told (within reason obviously) and unless you have real cause fro concern you should just get on with it.
    A doctor does NOT out rank a Nurse , a Doctor makes a request to the nursing Staff in the plans of care they prescribe.

    A Drs and a nurses job a so different its barely worth arguing about. If Drs wanted to wipe arses they would have been nurses, If nurses wanted to prescribe drugs and perform surgery they would have been Drs. :dontknow:
    i think you need to look at the roles there , or maybe all the prescribing and quasi prescribing ( i.e. PGDs etc) done by nurses is a myth - it damn well isn't * several thousand personally , ditto with 'surgical procedures ' again * several thousand personally ( wound closure, foreign body removal etc and the odd circulation critical dislocation )
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    how about considerably less responsibility, and until you are in a career grade post the ability to hide behind 'trainee' status ...
    lol. I think no one can make an arguement that a nurse has more responsibility than a doctor.


    I would be bored during nurse training. No scientific stimulus. I would be bored after a few years working as a nurse. I need something more substantial from my career :o: no one is arguing that nurses ARE needed, and are just as necessary as doctors, and is a very respectable career. Just ... I need something more challenging.

    Also- can't argue, medicine isn't great money but nursing is a lot worse!
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    (Original post by lekky)
    lol. I think no one can make an arguement that a nurse has more responsibility than a doctor.
    i think you need to support that incorrect assertion.

    as a registered Nurse once you are out of preceptorship you are accountable for your caseload on a shift to shift basis, you also hold ongoing accountability for any patient you are named nurse for.

    a Junior Doctor never holds the ongoing responsibility or accountability for a patient that is vested in the Consultant or Staff Specialist under whom the patient is admitted.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    A doctor does NOT out rank a Nurse , a Doctor makes a request to the nursing Staff in the plans of care they prescribe.


    Yes, they do. You say they don't because you are one of those nurses.
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    i asked an admissions tutor and they gave me a super secret answer
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    i think you need to support that incorrect assertion.

    as a registered Nurse once you are out of preceptorship you are accountable for your caseload on a shift to shift basis, you also hold ongoing accountability for any patient you are named nurse for.

    a Junior Doctor never holds the ongoing responsibility or accountability for a patient that is vested in the Consultant or Staff Specialist under whom the patient is admitted.
    without agreeing or disagreeing with you, and without degenerating to a pissing contest, what do you see as the doctor's role?
 
 
 
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