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Resolution 2009/08: Human Trafficking Of Women From Africa To Europe. Watch

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    Presented to the assembley on behalf of the UNODC:


    Resolution Concerning The Growing Human Trafficking Of Women From Africa To Europe For The Sex Trade


    Committee: Human Rights & Refugees
    Submitted by: The United Nation Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)

    The General Assembly of The United Nations,

    Noting with deep concern The recent sharp rise in the number of women being transported from west Africa (mainly from Nigeria and to a lesser extent Sierra Leone, Ghana, Cameroon and Guinea) to be sold into the sex trade in European countries (Italy, as well as the Netherlands, Spain, Belgium)

    Noting this criminal industry is worth between $152 million and $228 million annually, this is a major source of revenue for criminals

    Further noting the market sees a yearly inflow of between 3800 and 5700 women. It is estimated that West African trafficking victims comprise about 10 per cent of the forced sexual labour pool in Western Europe.

    Emphasising
    These women are being forced in the sex trade against their will and there are serious fears for their well being - as well as the obvious human rights and internation law violations.

    Taking into consideration some of these woman have no other option than to go the sex trade to pay debts and support families in abject poverty

    Calls for the following set of actions to be considered to reduce this human trafficking:


    1: Calls for tighter controls at borders, immigration and freight entry points to detect people being smuggled and stop them being put into the sex trade
    2: Urges greater use of intelligence gathering techniques by the authorities in Europe to locate gang masters who operate from shores of Europe.
    3: Further urges the setting up of an extradition treaty to allow the African side of the operation to be disruption and members extradited to face trial in Europe
    4: Calls for the setting up of a joint trans-continental task team with the ability for national police forces in Europe to use intelligence gathering techniques to locate, raid and remove the trafficking victims from brothels to safety. Also for the European police to help the African police in the same matter.
    5: Further urges national courts to pass tougher custodial sentences for those involved in this business
    6: Further calls for the ability to seize assets which are the proceeds of crime
    7: Encourages a worldwide commitment from all members to do all they can to stop this trade happening and preserve and protect the welfare of these most vulnerable women



    DUEL REPRESENTATION VOTES
    Noémie - UK (Yes), Israel (Yes)
    Captain Biggles - USA (Yes), Switzerland (Yes)
    Student2807 - France (Abstain), Venezuela (Yes)
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    Georgia supports this resolution in its entirety.
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    The UNDOC thanks Georgia for their full support and hopes all nations can combat this dangerous and degrading criminal menace to society
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    We also express concern over this, and we are disappointed that a lot of these women come from our nation. We welcome any help that nations offer us, so we can stop this crisis.
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    The Republic of Turkey wholeheartedly agrees with the concerns raised by the UNODC. All human beings should be treated with equality and the sex trade has only degraded these women. It has also breached Human Rights and action must be taken. However, the core of the problem, is finance issues. In this way, this issue is similar to that of piracy; in that the root of the issue is a lack of resources. Therefore, the Republic of Turkey feels that the resolution needs to contain something to help ease economic strain on countries where sex trade may seem like a way out.

    Also regarding operative clause 3:

    "3: Further urges the setting up of an extradition treaty to allow the African side of the operation to be disruption and members extradited to face trial in Europe"

    The Republic of Turkey is not so sure about this clause. Wouldn't enforcing European laws on African nationals be a breach of sovereignty? Perhaps removing this operative clause and strengthening the one that states that African governments should establish more restricting laws.

    Also, maybe these the education of these governments on ways of preventing sex trade (patrolling police, charity work,) would be an alternative and MEDCS (More Economically Developed Countries) could donate funding to establish this police force (for equipment, weapons, training). This way African countries would be more able to help themselves.

    (OOC) Sorry for the length of the post :o: (/OOC)
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    (Original post by taigan)
    The Republic of Turkey wholeheartedly agrees with the concerns raised by the UNODC. All human beings should be treated with equality and the sex trade has only degraded these women. It has also breached Human Rights and action must be taken. However, the core of the problem, is finance issues. In this way, this issue is similar to that of piracy; in that the root of the issue is a lack of resources. Therefore, the Republic of Turkey feels that the resolution needs to contain something to help ease economic strain on countries where sex trade may seem like a way out.

    Also regarding operative clause 3:

    "3: Further urges the setting up of an extradition treaty to allow the African side of the operation to be disruption and members extradited to face trial in Europe"

    The Republic of Turkey is not so sure about this clause. Wouldn't enforcing European laws on African nationals be a breach of sovereignty? Perhaps removing this operative clause and strengthening the one that states that African governments should establish more restricting laws.

    Also, maybe these the education of these governments on ways of preventing sex trade (patrolling police, charity work,) would be an alternative and MEDCS (More Economically Developed Countries) could donate funding to establish this police force (for equipment, weapons, training). This way African countries would be more able to help themselves.

    (OOC) Sorry for the length of the post :o: (/OOC)
    The UNODC thanks Turkey for their most helpful comments, being our first resolution under the new representation of myself my office is totally open to comments and suggestions.

    On the financial point, the UNODC does see the neglected economic section of the resolution and may decide treat this as a draft resolution which can be further refined before seeing if it is passed.

    Section 3 caused a great deal of problems for me in the wording, I feel the African police services are riddled with corruption, and their judicial system has also suffered from this. Our idea of a treaty for extradition would be presented by a government - taking for an example; Italy would present an extradition treaty request to Nigeria and if they see it fit they would accept it. Much similar to the way the United Kingdom of Great Britian and Nothern Ireland operate an extradition treaty with the United States of America. African polticial and judicial matters are not best stable at the moment, and we would feel comfortable if anyone accused of crimes commited by trafficking women to Europe faced trial there where they are more likely to recieve a fair sentence.

    Once again the UNODC would like to warmy thank Turkey for taking their time to spell out their most valid and well presented concerns regarding Resolution 2009/08 and we looking forward to working with Turkey and all nations in future.


    [ooc] Not at all :p: I made a long one too :p: [/ooc]
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    Cyprus fully supports this Resolution and it is concerned by the prevalence of the issue this Resolution is endeavouring to prevent.
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    Whilst Brazil supports the idea, we do have a few questions for the UNODC.

    Firstly, everything that has been suggested will take an enormous of money to implement. For instance, having tighter border controls will undoubtedly mean hiring more people to guard the borders. This will cost money. How does the UNODC expect to pay for this?

    Regarding Clause 3, we feel that this will be a very arduous process, and not to mention encroaching on the sovereignty of African nations, so we suggest that many of "smaller" criminals be tried in Africa, whilst the major, international gang masters be tried in an international court, e.g. the International Criminal Court in the Hague. Will the UNODC accept this?

    Concerning Clause 4, wouldn't it be better just to use Interpol for this rather than setting up a completely new force?
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    As a country on the frontline of Europe's fight against human trafficking, France is concerned about the implementation of many of the clauses of this resolution.
    It is all very well for countries around the world to support and vote for this resolution, but when the time comes to pay for measures such as tighter controls at borders, immigration and freight entry points, it will ultimately be a select few nations (such as ourselves, Spain, Italy and Greece) who foot the bill.

    Also being developed by the European Union is a common system for immigration and asylum, and we feel that this resolution would only serve to complicate and compromise this system.

    While France fully supports the fight against illegal human trafficking, we will not support this resolution and will continue to support and develop the internal EU immigration and asylum strategy which will itself work to battle these illegal activities.
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    The UNODC can see the problems with clauses in this resolution, we thank all nations for bring the issues of funding, complication and legal issues.

    (Original post by gyyy2807)
    Whilst Brazil supports the idea, we do have a few questions for the UNODC.

    Firstly, everything that has been suggested will take an enormous of money to implement. For instance, having tighter border controls will undoubtedly mean hiring more people to guard the borders. This will cost money. How does the UNODC expect to pay for this?

    Regarding Clause 3, we feel that this will be a very arduous process, and not to mention encroaching on the sovereignty of African nations, so we suggest that many of "smaller" criminals be tried in Africa, whilst the major, international gang masters be tried in an international court, e.g. the International Criminal Court in the Hague. Will the UNODC accept this?

    Concerning Clause 4, wouldn't it be better just to use Interpol for this rather than setting up a completely new force?
    The UNODC would take money from the assets seized from this hundred million dollar criminal affair, we would also seek appropriate funding from the world bank and if countries wanted to strengthen their borders in general we could help them to use their money effectively to tackle not just trafficking of people but also drugs, tabacco and alcohol

    The UNODC will galdly accept the comments on Clause 3

    Taking Clause 4 into account the UNODC agrees that an interpol task group could be better placed to manage this


    [OOC] A few over sights there!! :p: [/OOC]
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    (Original post by Radgebanter)
    The UNODC would take money from the assets seized from this hundred million dollar criminal affair, we would also seek appropriate funding from the world bank and if countries wanted to strengthen their borders in general we could help them to use their money effectively to tackle not just trafficking of people but also drugs, tabacco and alcohol
    The World Bank is happy to sponsor any project that will increase legitimate employment in African countries and attract citizens away from criminal activities.
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    (Original post by gyyy2807)
    The World Bank is happy to sponsor any project that will increase legitimate employment in African countries and attract citizens away from criminal activities.
    The UNODC warmly thanks the world bank for support in the shared goal of reducing criminal activity in the African continent
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    Mauritius agree's with this resolution and supports any actions to counter human trafficking.
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    This resolution should go to the vote today/tomorrow if the two sponsors are willing for this to be the final draft.


    [OOC]Tyler&Cameron - if you want it to go to the vote tonight, would you change the OP? If it's cool until morning, I'll do it, if you want [/OOC]
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    I shall put this to the vote for 4 days and announce it in a PM tonight.
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    Austria fully supports this resolution to back up our long smtabding commitment to human rights and the fight against crime
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    and one yes for israel.
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    Mexico wholeheartedly supports this resolution. Mexico would also like to commend the bearer of this resolution as it signifies a development in human rights and equality in the world.
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    Added one Yes for Israel
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    The US feels, along with others, that Clause 3 does nothing to show support for the region of Africa as a whole and could in fact be breaching the respective country's sovereignty and their ability to take criminals through their own justice system accordingly. America is pro-active in discouraging trafficking by putting aside funding for programmes throughout the world to protect the vulnerable who may be trafficked and also imposing tougher penalties on those who are involved in trafficking. We recognise, above all, that woman and children are the most vulnerable to being put through this awful ordeal however we would prefer if this resolution encompassed all vulnerable groups. We apologise that these words come too late for changes to be made but we will be supporting this resolution as it goes some way to addressing the major problems.

    Switzerland notes that this is a terrific, global problem that needs immediate attention and we commend the author of this resolution. As such, we would like vote yes.
 
 
 
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