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    I have always wondered how pay is compared.

    According to Al-FT women are paid 22.6% less than men!

    Do they compare males and females performing jobs (at the same company) with exactly the same specification and with equivalent levels of experience.

    Figures from the FT today have 'revealed' that women are paid 36% less in the media and 27% less in medicine but have equivalent pay in retail and pay which is on average 2% higher than males in the technology sector.

    It also mentions that women on average reach a senior managerial position by the age of 41 whilst men reach the same position by the age of 47 though males are overrepresented 10-fold at this level relative to male:female ratio in the general population.

    The gender pay gap in the UK is much higher than in countries such as Deutschland (12%), France (11%) and Italia (15%).

    What should be done to address this?

    Could it be that fewer women than men apply for certain high-earning positions - e.g. front office nvestissement banking, fund management, surgery, corporate law etc.?

    Is gender stereotyping during the adolescent years in mixed-sex schools contributing to this.

    Is the man in a heterosexual couple still perceived by older generations to be 'the breadwinner'?

    It would be interested to compare male:female earning power for individuals who are 18-30, don't you think?

    Reports suggest that females (on average) outperform males in further/higher education. Could men be outperforming women in non-academic areas during adolescent years leading to them earning more on average?

    What do you reckon?

    squish.
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    bump.
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    Why can't you add squish to your signature?


    Edit: As to answer the question, it could be to do with males being in a higher positions quite often and thus earning more pay, because they are often perceived as managers...etc of a company. I think, sub-conciously, very old-fashioned people (or even non old-fashioned people) will often trust a man more to be the "bread-winner" as well of a relationship; the one bringing home the bacon.
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    This is very interesting. I think we need more government legislation, forcing companies to release pay figures to employees, therby creating more transparency in the workplace and enabling employees to see whether they are recieving the same pay as an equivalent employee.
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    Men are more likely to ask for higher pay.
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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    Men are more likely to ask for higher pay.
    This is a big reason. Men far more regularly push for higher pay, yet Women feel they will be noticed and remunerated appropriately if they work hard.
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    Why do you add 'squish' to EVERY single god damn post of yours! I mean how anal does one have to be to type the same word out over and over again! It doesn't even make sense!

    On topic: I'm not entirely sure, maybe it's because the higher paying jobs predominantly involve men?
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    Women are more likely to want long periods of time off to have a kid, or even to quit and become housewives.

    Is this pay gap constant through all ages of women?

    Rich
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    Pertinent to this: http://mises.org:88/WalterBlock
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    Maybe its because women have to take time off when they are between about 20 and 30 and then after maternity leave may only work part time. Im no expert but it could be that it is during this time that many of the men begin to move up the pay ladders and start to get those promising positions
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    (Original post by Richard_A_Garner)
    Women are more likely to want long periods of time off to have a kid, or even to quit and become housewives.

    Is this pay gap constant through all ages of women?

    Rich
    It would be more interesting to compare childless men with childless women to see if there is any effect of gender.

    Males achieve their first 'exec' position by 29 and women by 30 (on avg. according to the FT feature).

    Apparently women earn more up to the age of 30 than men do - wonder why this is? Coincidence or the effect of better academic qualifications.

    squish.
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
    Males achieve their first 'exec' position by 29 and women by 30
    Whats an exec position?

    btw that isnt really a difference, it could be that on average males acheive it by 28 years 11 months and woman by 30 years and 2 months.
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    (Original post by la fille danse)
    Men are more likely to ask for higher pay.
    Why do you think this is?

    Why don't women request higher rates of remuneration?

    Do you reckon that base pay is standardized regardless of gender, but that performance-related bonuses or overtime (for some reason) paid to males may be significantly higher than those paid to female people?

    squishysquish.
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    Men get higher pay because women get privileges which are exclusive to women. These include things such as maternity leave and shorter hours due to child care and general family life.
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSdZlPKHpUQ

    Quite good
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    (Original post by Olivia_Lightbulb)
    This is very interesting. I think we need more government legislation, forcing companies to release pay figures to employees, therby creating more transparency in the workplace and enabling employees to see whether they are recieving the same pay as an equivalent employee.
    Pay may be different for each individual dependent on contract negotiated, prior experience (even if the 2 people perform the same job specification) and responsibilities. Variable performance and commitment to overtime may result in some employees being paid more than others.

    Also, in some workplaces there is a strict policy whereby pay in certain positinos may not be discussed between employees. Obviously if there is sufficient justification for the variable pay then I see no reason why it cannot be made transparent.

    As far as I am aware I am paid at the same rate (instead of less) as my older female colleagues who perform the same functions.

    I am surprised that the 'pay-gap' is that wide - are you surprised that many women have not publicly complained or demonstrated about this? If not, why not?

    Off-topic, but there are more female (48,000) than male (37,000) millionaires in Al-UK (according to Al-BBC).

    squishysquish.
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    (Original post by xps.systems)
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    Whats an 'exec' position?
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Whats an 'exec' position?
    It isn't made clear.

    I'm assuming in a financial sense it means a 'non-operational' role.

    E.g. bid exec? sales exec? - something revenue-generating?

    squish.
 
 
 
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