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    This year I've pretty much turned half our back garden into a veg patch, and even planted a few beans, aubergines, globe artichokes and pumpkins in the front garden.


    Anyway, if you have a garden and know that you'll be there for a full year, then rather than have the usual student garden that is basically a mix of large ashtray and empty can and bottle depository, with the odd discarded disposable BBQ. Why not try growing some veg, maybe a few carrots, or if you're a stir fry fanatic Pak Choi is really easy and very fast growing. And of course then there's salads, very easy, very quick, very cheap and very tasty...



    However, the reason I am posting now is that I've just made myself and the girls purple mash potato. Potatoes are just about the easiest crop to grow, you just dig some manure into the ground, then plonk a seed potato every foot or so. You can earth up for an increased yield, or just chuck some cheap compost on top, I managed to get a load from the allotments at the bottom of my road in exchange for some of my excess seedlings.


    Anyway, for purple mash potatoes you will need some potatoes of the variety 'Congo', which I'm pretty sure you won't be able to buy in the shops for eating, so you'll have to grow your own. You can however buy the variety 'Salad Blue', but I don't believe that the pigmentation is as strong, but I will be trying to grow this as well next year.

    Get your freshly harvested potatoes, clean them, if large enough then peel them as well (mine weren't, and won't be until the end of August), cut them up nice and small and then steam them, probably best for about twenty minutes. I believe that boiling would destroy most of the colour.


    Then mash with a fork or masher, add butter, salt and pepper, grated cheese and so on to taste. In november I intend adding some of the purple curly kale that I'm growing for added 'purple-ness'.

    Serve alongside steamed purple carrots 'purple haze', steamed purple sprouts, maybe with the meat component being a 'coq-au-van' and there you go, just about the most purple meal you could possibly hope for.



    And.... All that purple is stuffed full of antioxidants, so its even better for you than would otherwise be the case...
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    Great but sadly my garden is gravel and concrete :sad:
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    Thats cute Might try it!
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    I hoping to move into my own little place before summer next year. I am definitely gona try and grow all the things I love to eat, nothing better than fresh food

    Are you allowed to use gardens to grow vegetables when you're only renting the place?
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    Home-grown peas. Pretty much the best thing in nature. Full stop.

    Expensive things, but if you have a sunny wall, train a raspberry cane up for some tasty autumn fruits. Consider growing the tatties carefully though, you'll never get rid of them in the years after.

    Leeks are another good one, just remember to blanch the bottoms with soil.
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    (Original post by Rian1988)
    Great but sadly my garden is gravel and concrete :sad:
    Carrots can be grown in deep pots, potatoes in canvas bags which are then cut open when ready to harvest, tomatos in hanging baskets... etc.
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    (Original post by xo-Heva)
    Carrots can be grown in deep pots, potatoes in canvas bags which are then cut open when ready to harvest, tomatos in hanging baskets... etc.
    Genius!
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    oh what
    i thought that thread was about growing ganja
    well dissapointed
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    both my homes have no gardens
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    Don't grow carrots in fresh manure or pure compost though. They'll split to find nutrients.

    Actually, do it, some of the shapes you get are pretty cool.
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    salad vegetables are easy as you like to grow, even things like cress on your window sill etc.
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    My grandad lives next door and has a fairly large garden which is great as it seems to compensate for our piddly one. He grows potatoes, leeks, onions, rhubarb, cabbage, strawberries, raspberries, plums, apples, tomatoes and whatnot. I think I've missed out a couple but you get the point. He loves his garden

    He doesn't use all of the fruit and veg himself so we get a lot of it too. It just seems so much nicer to be able to get it from the garden instead of nipping to the supermarket and bringing it home wrapped in plastic!
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    (Original post by Rian1988)
    Great but sadly my garden is gravel and concrete :sad:

    My 'Congo' purple potatoes are growing in what basically amounts to sturdy plastic bags, only slightly stronger than a compost bag. My pumkins are growing in 35 litre plastic pots, and of course my tomatoes, aubergines, cucumbers, etc... are all growing in grow-bags.

    If you go organic you can get two grow-bags for about £8, probably half that if you use peat based. You just need to keep it well watered and remember to feed them at least once a week once the fruit starts to set. If you don't want to, or can't raise the seedlings yourself, you can usually pick young tomato plants, etc... for about £1 each at the begining of spring.


    Oh and you can grow potatoes in old builder's buckets with a couple of holes punched in the bottom...
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    I planted some spuds that had started sprouting in the cupboard into an unused black bin in our garden at Easter. Done essentially nothing to them except water and stick some canes in, just had to upturn the bin to tip all the soil out and collected almost 5kg of them So, very easy to grow and produced a reasonable amount. If it I had my way though I would start digging up 1/2 the garden and get some chickens but unfortunately parents slightly disagree.
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    I have my own allotment when I'm at home in Peterborough and the parents look after it and theirs whilst I'm away (dad is head of the local allotment society lol) Growing raspberries, carrots, peas, and potatoes at the moment.

    (I feel like an old man)
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    Was hoping this would be weed related.
 
 
 
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