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10k run watch

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    CARBO LOAD

    You have a week left so it's too late to train properly, but carbo loading is meant to take place the week before the race, up till the race. pro's do it and it's meant to help a lot xD

    wiki it.
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    (Original post by yoshifumu)
    CARBO LOAD

    You have a week left so it's too late to train properly, but carbo loading is meant to take place the week before the race, up till the race. pro's do it and it's meant to help a lot xD

    wiki it.
    (Original post by Nhala)
    Have porridge the morning of. Get a bit of interval speedwork done this week. Take glucose pouches before or poss one during if you are not used to middle distance running. Other than that: pace yourself, only sprint towards the end, if you have it in you, OR like in some races where a bridge etc will be there will be a mass of people blocking your route, hah! With your height you should "eat up more ground", but you will not have the legspeed of someone who is 5"8.
    Surely a waste of time? If anything, better off going with an isotonic sports drink so that he's getting water and glucose in the right ratio. But either way, for a 10k I would have thought he's unlikely to see any particular benefit from excess carbs if he just eats well in the coming week or so? Changing diet or introducing new things so soon before a race, without prep, seems like a bad idea.

    OP - like has already been said, you're probably best off learning to pace yourself before the race. A lot of improvement can be made in a short time simply from learning to push yourself and to maintain a pace.

    Edit: Also, don't eat too soon before the race!
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    (Original post by Tyraell)
    Surely a waste of time? If anything, better off going with an isotonic sports drink so that he's getting water and glucose in the right ratio. But either way, for a 10k I would have thought he's unlikely to see any particular benefit from excess carbs if he just eats well in the coming week or so? Changing diet or introducing new things so soon before a race, without prep, seems like a bad idea.

    OP - like has already been said, you're probably best off learning to pace yourself before the race. A lot of improvement can be made in a short time simply from learning to push yourself and to maintain a pace.

    Edit: Also, don't eat too soon before the race!
    carbo loading is meant to be introduced slowly over the week before the race? so it's not a sudden change, and it's how it is always done. it's meant to work. excess carbs means he can push himself a bit harder, and run for longer. so does help.
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    (Original post by Tyraell)
    Surely a waste of time? If anything, better off going with an isotonic sports drink so that he's getting water and glucose in the right ratio. But either way, for a 10k I would have thought he's unlikely to see any particular benefit from excess carbs if he just eats well in the coming week or so? Changing diet or introducing new things so soon before a race, without prep, seems like a bad idea.

    OP - like has already been said, you're probably best off learning to pace yourself before the race. A lot of improvement can be made in a short time simply from learning to push yourself and to maintain a pace.

    Edit: Also, don't eat too soon before the race!
    Have to disagree with the isotonic drink, as there will be a water station(s) there (I presume) and glucose puches really do the job (not a waste of time), whilst also being really easy to use. Carrying an isotonic drink would be frustrating beyond belief!

    I do agree with your comments about pace and not eating too soon before the race, OR drinking too much, too soon before the race. Also, stay off bread for a few days before :rolleyes:

    I would suggest getting some proper running trainers, however. See Runners World for advice and go to a running shop for advice on what shoes you need for your gait.
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    UPDATE: Went to our last training session before the run tonight and did a 8k run/fastwalk over a very hilly course in about 50 minutes (not too bad i dont think) and the course we are doing on sunday is much flatter actually completely flat. Never felt too out of breath just had a stitch alot (no idea we were running that session didnt get a text) and a recurring problem i get on road running where my calves tighten up. Does anybody know how I can sort that out. After about 2 minutes running my calves seize up and dont recover. This could seriously jeopardise my race on Sunday.
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    (Original post by yoshifumu)
    carbo loading is meant to be introduced slowly over the week before the race? so it's not a sudden change, and it's how it is always done. it's meant to work. excess carbs means he can push himself a bit harder, and run for longer. so does help.
    Its a bit pointless on such a short distance tho.
    He's going to be out there for less than an hour or so.
    Still, wont do any harm, food tastes good!
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    (Original post by MaccyG)
    After about 2 minutes running my calves seize up and dont recover. This could seriously jeopardise my race on Sunday.
    Is this after stretching and warmup?
    Does this not affect you in your sport?
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    (Original post by Chrrye)
    Is this after stretching and warmup?
    Does this not affect you in your sport?
    Got there late and so no warm up or stretching well no proper one anyway. And no if I was running on a pitch i wouldnt get it. It is only on roads or hard ground.
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    Just to add my 2p worth to the glucose/isotonic discussion, I would say that whilst I personally find stuff like Lucozade to be too sugary to stomach as my only source of hydration, I would be very wary of starting to use a gel on the day of your race. It's very easy to misjudge your nutrition with them - they require a large amount of water at the same time to prevent water being drawn back into your stomach to process it. This causes an alternative dehydration, can give cramps, runners trots, etc...

    I use energy gels now, but I know what works, how much to take, and how much water to consume with them (and I still end up wasting half sachets as I don't take it all on). To that end, I would recommend drinking some lucozade before the race (though not in the immediate 45 minutes prior to the start), and to take water with you. If you are going to use an energy gel/glucose-fructose tablet or similar, be very cautious.

    Best of luck!
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    (Original post by MaccyG)
    Got there late and so no warm up or stretching well no proper one anyway. And no if I was running on a pitch i wouldnt get it. It is only on roads or hard ground.
    (Original post by Gypsy King)
    To that end, I would recommend drinking some lucozade before the race (though not in the immediate 45 minutes prior to the start), and to take water with you. If you are going to use an energy gel/glucose-fructose tablet or similar, be very cautious.

    Best of luck!
    this guy knows his stuff. Although if a charity race there's a good chance there may be water stops along the way so find out and that will mean you wont have to cart a bottle round with you.

    Make sure you do a proper warm up otherwise it sounds like a possible lack of cushioning/shoe issue.
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    Also on the warming up... it's a big no from me to static stretches before you set off - you're only gonna risk pulling something and putting excess strain on yourself. Whilst you may be wary of how much energy you are using (especially given that you want to set a respectable time), you WILL benefit from going for a light jog before the start. Just 10 minutes, down the road for 5 and back, you'll see other people doing it too. That way you can loosen up and stretch supple muscles.
 
 
 
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