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Did you research your university course thoroughly? Watch

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    Yes - Went to university
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    Yes - Went to different university
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    How many people here looked into and planned their course from Year 1?

    Anybody go to different universities despite the course being better elsewhere?
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    i didnt research my course at all. was in for quite a surprise when i arrived.
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    I just liked the sound of my course, so put it down on my UCAS form.
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    uni close to home + course I wanted to do = my decision

    I didn't even know what was on the syllabus when I picked it that's how rash my decision was.
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    I haven't researched at all. I doubt I'll get in this either. But next year, I'll reapply and still won't bother researching thoroughly.
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    Thoroughly? No. Bit more than a brief research though. It can be difficult for some if they wish to pursue a thorough piece of research on prospective courses because it's not like reading lists and class formats are given on the course websites now is it? For some courses like psychology and criminology, two degrees of the same name can be very different to each other. Like for criminology at postgraduate level, Cambridge is a re-run of my time at Durham paying lots of attention to the classical/old school thoughts while at Oxford it's more like a law degree.
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    They usually provide the module list if you like the titles, you're done.
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    What do you mean "go to different universities despite the course being elsewhere"? Why would you do that? :s

    I knew what I would have to do in my first year and vaguely had an idea about where my interests would lie, but it's probably best not to prioritise your modules and decide your future module options until the time comes to choose them.
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    I think I researched it a little too much... :redface:
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    I thoroughly researched the course before applying... I think I actually went somewhat overboard. :p:

    Economics while broadly the same at most universities differs in terms of quantitative content, whether this be in terms of microeconomics, macroeconomics, or econometrics. Personally I wanted a course which had a strong focus on econometrics.

    Obviously I went on the websites and looked at the modules available at each university, but I also contacted specific lecturers and students at each university to ask more questions about each module and to inquire regarding topics covered, reading lists, and importantly for me, the level of econometrics. I even in a number of cases requested slides for the modules so I could compare for myself between the different universities.

    I did this for pretty much most modules throughout the degree at each university I was considering so I could be sure the course would be exactly what I wanted.

    Excessive? Very much so. :laugh:
    But at the end of the day, I know now the course is right for me, and additionally it helped me learn a lot more about the discipline I’m about to embark upon.
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    Community Assistant
    (Original post by NDGAARONDI)
    It can be difficult for some if they wish to pursue a thorough piece of research on prospective courses because it's not like reading lists and class formats are given on the course websites now is it?
    Contact admissions? Contact the lecturers for said course? If someone really wants to thoroughly research the course, they can do. It's not that hard to send an email or pick up a phone.
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    I'd chosen which subject I wanted to study when I was 15. As soon as I got to Sixth Form, I began researching the various universities which offered it, and continued this until the application date. I went into every little detail about every university and every course, as well as attending open days, to ensure that I was getting perfection.
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    I researched my course very thoroughly and I think it paid off (my tutor recognised me from all the open days, so he knew I was quite serious about my application, etc.) :yes:
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    The problem is you wont know what youre going to enjoy until youre in uni studying it properly. Especially if its a complex subject you dont know much about yet.

    I remember i was dead against laboratory work when i was applying for courses and chose the ones with the most theoretical content. But it turned out that my final year project in the lab was by far the most enjoyable and rewarding thing i did at university.

    Plus keep in mind the city and uni itself is as important if not more important than the course. You need to be somewhere you enjoy living because if youre not happy it will affect your performance and ultimately the degree you get at the end.
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    I researched the hell out of my subject and university. However, upon starting I still quickly decided that both the university and career choice wasn't for me, and I transferred after the first year. Still stuck with the course though..
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    I researched mine a lot, as I'm taking a more vocational degree, dental hygiene and therapy, I did weeks of work experience, lots of research and went to the open days. I think this definitely put me at an advantage as when it came to interviews I had a lot more to say for myself!
    Just hope I meet my offer now
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    Ah, what I did was embarrassing.

    I applied for art, because it sounded fun and I wanted to do some non-studying. I figured I could do it for 6 months or a year, and then if it was very good continue but otherwise just drop out and then start a real education later. I was unemployed and needed university as a back-up but didn't really want to study.

    Didn't know much of the course at all, only the name - "creative art"... I figured we'd get to do some painting.

    It turned out to be awful, because it was really unorganized and boring. I couldn't leave university either because I needed the student funding to pay my rent. I e-mailed university and said "pretty please, let me swap to something real" and I was allowed to start Politics&Economics the next day. That course has been organized and well, serious. I like that. Turns out studying politics is something that really suits me and I really like it. However economics makes me cry because I hate maths and I hate graphs and there's nothing fun about economics.

    Next semester was supposed to be maths, statistics and other boring stuff so I have now arranged to be a guest student at university of Warsaw this upcoming fall and spring, where I'll get to study political science, international relations and such. No economics! But I'm sending new application in UCAS in the fall, because I have nothing to return to (if I want to finish my course I have to study economics and statistics and such and I refuse to. -.-)
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    I'm hopefully going to uni next year, and I've been researching for ages! It's a long way off yet, but I hate the thought of ending up somewhere I hate, studying something that bores me senseless. So if I research and plan enough, I should end up somewhere good
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    (Original post by .ACS.)
    Contact admissions? Contact the lecturers for said course? If someone really wants to thoroughly research the course, they can do. It's not that hard to send an email or pick up a phone.
    Sometimes they don't like it. I emailed Queen Mary for further information, asking a selected reading list and further insight to the course for an LLM in medical law, and got no reply. Their tough luck as I'd have been paying full fees without a single penny from research councils. I'll do what you said for Cambridge but I don't think I'd get any. A get around would be to find a student on the course and then contact them. That said, some courses have a selected bibliography for modules but these tend to be postgraduate courses rather than undergraduate. Presumably they don't think undergraduates will use this to help make informed decisions.
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    A bit, but not really thoroughly.
 
 
 
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