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gurz
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plz plz plz,can sum 1 help me, i need 2 do a introduction on how the length of the wire affects the resistance
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LPK
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(Original post by gurz)
plz plz plz,can sum 1 help me, i need 2 do a introduction on how the length of the wire affects the resistance
i learnt about this but i cant remember i will think about it
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Tribi18
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(Original post by gurz)
plz plz plz,can sum 1 help me, i need 2 do a introduction on how the length of the wire affects the resistance

The main prediction I will make is that the results will be directly proportional because my preliminary results showed that volts were proportional to length. This is because when lengths doubles so does volts. I believe this will happen again on a larger scale. The length also maters, the longer the wire the more volts passing through.#

A fixed current of 1.00 amp passed through a wire of 40cm. The volts moved to measure the P.d across different parts of the wire for example 10cm, 20cm, 30cm and 40cm.

The volts were directly proportional to the length of wire. For example the length of wire was 20cm and volts as 1.48. When we did 40cm of wire the results were 2.96. Showing that 1.48 doubled as did the length of wire.

Let me know if any of this helps!! )
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munkeh
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resistivity = Resistance x Cross-sectional area / length

A bit of algebraic manipulation and

Resistance = resistivity x length /cross-sectional area

R = rho(<--greek letter) x L / A

From this you can see that the bigger the length the bigger the resistance, this is due to their being less pathways for the current to flow through the wire in a straight line.

hope this helps, other people feel free to criticise, this is AS physics
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meepmeep
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(Original post by munkeh)
resistivity = Resistance x Cross-sectional area / length

A bit of algebraic manipulation and

Resistance = resistivity x length /cross-sectional area

R = rho(<--greek letter) x L / A

From this you can see that the bigger the length the bigger the resistance, this is due to their being less pathways for the current to flow through the wire in a straight line.

hope this helps, other people feel free to criticise, this is AS physics
Yup, and rho is this: ρ (not a p mind, found in character map)
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