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    (Original post by kels488)
    Hi!
    I have just graduated with a 2.2 in psychology and was hoping to do my masters this year- but most MAs are looking 2.1s . My longterm goal is to become a neuropsychologist or something related, but i need to get onto a MA to rebuke my 2.2- but most MAs in Psychology are looking 2.1s- I find this bizzare!:mad::woo:
    Anyone been in the same position as me or give me advice on how i can go forward?
    thanks
    Here are a few threads from Psyclick specifically for Psych that you might find useful concerning a 2.2:

    General advice about 2.2s
    http://forum.psyclick.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=5615
    http://forum.psyclick.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=5163
    http://forum.psyclick.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=4067
    http://forum.psyclick.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=3844
    http://forum.psyclick.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=2596
    http://forum.psyclick.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=1362
    http://forum.psyclick.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=870

    What the courses say about 2.2s
    http://forum.psyclick.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=675

    A heated debate:
    http://forum.psyclick.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=3339

    No doubt I will be warned for linking to another forum, but whatever, it's useful.
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    (Original post by mickeyfit)
    My impression of the postgrad system is that they discourage people from applying purely for the reason of rebuking their bad undergrad degree, which is why entry onto them is usually to the same standard as entry onto any graduate scheme.
    Not to mention that PG's are extremely hard work, that require great academic ability, so most uni's will expect a 2:1 as proof that you will be able to handle the coursework and understand the concepts covered.
    Also, from reading the Postgrad threads, it is also my understanding that an MA will not replace a poor performance in UG - employers will still refer to your UG result.
    I would say an undergraduate course is much more rigorous and difficult than a postgraduate one. The latter is a way for universities to make money.
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    (Original post by princessnavi22)
    People take 2.2s far too bad on here!!
    It's not the end of the world!! Geez!!
    Of course it's not the end of the world, but for someone hoping to do a PhD in a relatively popular subject, it's still quite a setback. (I have no idea whether Psychology really is that competititve at graduate level, but G50's comments suggest that it is).
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    My brother got onto a Masters Course in Durham University with a 2.2 (mind you was in law).
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    Of course it's not the end of the world, but for someone hoping to do a PhD in a relatively popular subject, it's still quite a setback. (I have no idea whether Psychology really is that competititve at graduate level, but G50's comments suggest that it is).
    Considering Assistant Psychologist jobs can receive ~300 applications per place within about 24 hours of them being posted, I'd say yes, unfortunately.

    Psych is tear-jerkingly competitive at postgraduate level and can take 5 years or so before applicants get on. There is a huge bottleneck as previous posters have said, and only the top notch candidates get the places.
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    Like undergraduate entry requirements, sometimes this 2:1 can be a reflection of the demand on the course- several courses are really only interested in people who are very close to firsts, for instance. It's been mentioned, but look at Aberdeen. It's location usually puts a lot of people off applying, so I doubt its courses will be full- it also had the world's first chair of Psychology, and a relative graduated in Psych from there about a decade ago- it ain't half bad.

    Some postgrad courses are little more than money spinners, and lecturers criticisms of them seem to indicate they're at best only equal to another final honours year. However, it's best to avoid generalisations on this front, some (especially those which prepare people for further research) are not really designed to bring in the foreign students who pay big fees (the MBA has made a lot of unis a lot of cash), so you may well find them rigorous and demanding. You have to be prepared to work pretty damn hard, but a 2:2 is not the end of the world- I know a 2:2 St Andrews grad with a distinction (and prize) from a masters at Dundee who went on to gain PhD funding.
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    (Original post by kels488)
    My longterm goal is to become a neuropsychologist or something related, but i need to get onto a MA to rebuke my 2.2- but most MAs in Psychology are looking 2.1s- I find this bizzare!:mad::woo:
    Neuropsychologist is a nice word but what do you actually want to do? Clinical work? Research? What area?

    A masters at this stage will be very expensive for you, have you thought about how you'd pay for it? Funded positions will be the ones with the most competition so you would probably struggle toget on one.

    My advice is to work out what you want to do and get some work experience (employed and paid if you can) as close as you can get to it. Some places will even want to help you take a masters or whatever later on.
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    (Original post by RadioElectric)
    Neuropsychologist is a nice word but what do you actually want to do? Clinical work? Research? What area?

    A masters at this stage will be very expensive for you, have you thought about how you'd pay for it? Funded positions will be the ones with the most competition so you would probably struggle toget on one.

    My advice is to work out what you want to do and get some work experience (employed and paid if you can) as close as you can get to it. Some places will even want to help you take a masters or whatever later on.
    I fail to see how any of this is relevant to what OP posted.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I fail to see how any of this is relevant to what OP posted.
    Then you must be confused:

    Hi!
    I have just graduated with a 2.2 in psychology and was hoping to do my masters this year- but most MAs are looking 2.1s . My longterm goal is to become a neuropsychologist or something related, but i need to get onto a MA to rebuke my 2.2- but most MAs in Psychology are looking 2.1s- I find this bizzare!
    Anyone been in the same position as me or give me advice on how i can go forward?
    thanks
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    (Original post by RadioElectric)
    Then you must be confused:
    Still not relevant.

    OP was asking how to proceed on to postgrad with a 2.2, yet here you are questioning his ability to fund the course as well as his direction in what he wants to do. Not really useful.
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    (Original post by kels488)
    Yup i am taking a year out ll! :eek3: i need a break, but am going to spend that year working productively getting experience in the field (most of it will be voluntary) and travelling for a bit!
    What is a graduate diploma? never heard of it before!
    Cheers Kels
    It's sort of not quite a masters but would make you more attractive to universities (possibly) =) I'm not even sure there are psychology ones. But yeah, if you do a gap year, as other people have said - lots of relevant experience is a v good idea, and if you can combine this with travelling even better =D That's what I'll be doing next year between masters and phd, but for arch/heritage =)
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Still not relevant.

    OP was asking how to proceed on to postgrad with a 2.2, yet here you are questioning his ability to fund the course as well as his direction in what he wants to do. Not really useful.
    I consider my advice to be relevant and useful. Your complaints are not.
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    Well to be honest, I think with effort, dedication and especially relevant work experience, you should be able to get onto a masters somewhere. This is especially true if you're going for ones in neuroscience areas of psychology and neuroimaging as quite a few good quality institutions have recently introduced courses and new ones are easier to get onto than established ones.

    But think about whether that's really what you want to be doing. If you do want to go on to neuropsychology, getting onto those later courses is going to be a hell of a lot more competitive than a masters, so if they're picking between you and someone who didn't need to do a Masters to "rebuke a 2.2", I'm afraid I don't see you coming out of that well.

    I'm just saying that if you're looking to do a Masters as a path into something else, do the research on the other courses, email admissions tutors etc. to make sure that the masters will actually lead you where you want it to.
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    Taken from one of the links I have already previously posted, one of the forum members collated all of their replies from enquiring to universities about having a 2.2 and applying to the d.clin.psych.


    UCL
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    although a 2:2 is not in your..., the additional academic experience you have gained most certainly is....Your clinical experience is also very relevant.

    Firstly we look for people with a good academic track-record.

    >Having established this, we look for evidence that candidates:
    >a) know about the service context they're going to be working in. Do they have some experience of structured/ statutory services (this could be in the NHS, or in a voluntary setting such as a MIND day centre, or in a
    social services unit), and do they show some awareness of how psychologists function within the NHS? Candidates who have only worked with individuals, or only worked in non-clinical settings, may not appreciate how the service ontext impacts on the way psychologists work. Similarly candidated whose clinical experience has been almost entirely gained abroad may not have a detailed understanding of the role of clinical psychology within the NHS.
    >
    >
    >b) have a realistic sense of the sort of clients they'll be working
    with.Have they come across the sort of clients Clinical Psychologists see,
    and the challenges such clients present?
    >
    >c) know what Clinical Psychologists actually do, and what they don't do

    >Finally, we don't think people should have to serve a long apprenticeship
    before entering training. We don't think it's necessary for candidates to
    have had a clinical job and a research job, nor do candidates need to have
    experience in more than one clinical area. What we do look for is evidence
    of the above - for some this can be gained in one post, for others more
    experience might be necessary.
    >
    >Some applicants do not gain an interview because of particular weaknesses
    (e.g., lack of experience, weak academic background or poor expression on
    the form). Others, however, do not get an interview simply because of the
    intense competition for training places: many applicants meet the basic
    requirements, and our (very difficult) job is to come to a decision about
    which candidates are the strongest.


    Oxford

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    academic requirements at Oxford are usually that candidates have achieved an upper second honours degree. There are however some exceptions, principally when the undergraduate degree does not provide a true reflection of academic ability. The important thing is to provide evidence that this is the case (e.g., by proving that there were extenuating circumstances that resulted in a poorer grade than expected). Being accepted for a PhD would also count as evidence in my opinion. However, applications are not likely to be considered from candidates who are currently registered for a PhD, unless this is nearing completion.


    Surrey
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    "thank you for your email. You are right that having a 2:2 is likely to
    prove a problem when applying for clinical courses. There are some
    courses that indicate (in the handbook) that they will simply not
    consider anyone with a 2:2. Others, like Surrey, will consider those
    with a 2:2 in exceptional circumstances. There is obviously no hard and
    fast rule about this, but it is likely in practice to mean having a very
    good pass (e.g. a distinction) on an MSc, or having a PhD. Other
    possible academic experiences which might be helpful (although not as
    good) would be having published papers in good quality peer-reviewed
    journals (e.g. the British Journal of Clinical Psychology), or having
    attended and presented at national or international conferences.



    Southampton
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    MSc Research Methods/Health Psychology is an indication of academic
    ability that we would take into account beyond your original degree. It
    looks like you have strengths which might gain you an interview place
    here, subject to how you present yourself on an application form and
    subject to the other competition!"



    UEL
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    Given your record, we would give your application the most serious
    consideration, though (obviously) alongside that of many others applicants,
    in the competitive process organised by the Clearing House


    Exeter
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    If you had good reasons for
    not performing to your full potential and can demonstrate the academic and
    research skills necessary for study at doctoral level, which from your email
    you appear to have then the 2(ii) should not being a bar to your being
    considered. Of course it is not possible to say whether you will in fact be
    successful since getting a place depends on many factors including the
    competition you face from other candidates.


    Salomons
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    Within our selection system having completed the MSc's would compensate for
    the 2:2, completing the PhD would of course compensate even further. From
    the information you have told me your experience would be valuable in terms
    of getting an interview - of course this is dependent upon the overall
    quality of your application form. Your experience could be strengthened by
    gaining more paid clinical experience in the NHS. I hope this information is
    helpful to you.


    Bristol
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    a 2: 2 degree does not disadvantage you in situations where you have gone on
    to develop your academic strengths via MSc/ PhD etc. you also have a good
    deal of relevant clinical experience so i would encourage you to apply


    So yeah, some good and some bad.
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    (Original post by RadioElectric)
    I consider my advice to be relevant and useful. Your complaints are not.
    Agreed!

    If someone is asking how to get onto a postgraduate course in order to go onto do something else, then their reasons and the other factors affecting whether they are able to do a course are entirely relevant.
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    (Original post by Mitothy)
    Well to be honest, I think with effort, dedication and especially relevant work experience, you should be able to get onto a masters somewhere. This is especially true if you're going for ones in neuroscience areas of psychology and neuroimaging as quite a few good quality institutions have recently introduced courses and new ones are easier to get onto than established ones.
    The consensus I've heard from postgraduates is that masters courses are great moneyspinners for universities. Over the year you'll be putting a significant amount of money into the institution so you need to make sure you'll get that an appropriate amount of value back out of it.

    (This is probably no less true for most undergraduate courses, but then you don't feel the sting of the expense quite so readily there.)
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    (Original post by RadioElectric)
    The consensus I've heard from postgraduates is that masters courses are great moneyspinners for universities. Over the year you'll be putting a significant amount of money into the institution so you need to make sure you'll get that an appropriate amount of value back out of it.

    (This is probably no less true for most undergraduate courses, but then you don't feel the sting of the expense quite so readily there.)
    Certainly true that a lot of masters courses are profitable for uni's but people tend to hear the word "moneyspinners" and have a knee jerk reaction, assuming that they must be useless and that they are just there to take advantage of mugs. This isn't the case for (the majority) of courses, they simply are expensive as we live in a world of supply and demand.

    Also, the psychology masters fees I looked at back when I was applying were some of the lowest out of all the different subjects, so its certainly not a charge which sticks in the same way as it does to an MBA or other management courses.
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    (Original post by Mitothy)
    Certainly true that a lot of masters courses are profitable for uni's but people tend to hear the word "moneyspinners" and have a knee jerk reaction, assuming that they must be useless and that they are just there to take advantage of mugs. This isn't the case for (the majority) of courses, they simply are expensive as we live in a world of supply and demand.

    Also, the psychology masters fees I looked at back when I was applying were some of the lowest out of all the different subjects, so its certainly not a charge which sticks in the same way as it does to an MBA or other management courses.
    I agree totally, all I'm saying is that the Masters is a product that you're buying so you have the right to be demanding in what you get out of it.
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    (Original post by kels488)
    Hi!
    I have just graduated with a 2.2 in psychology and was hoping to do my masters this year- but most MAs are looking 2.1s . My longterm goal is to become a neuropsychologist or something related, but i need to get onto a MA to rebuke my 2.2- but most MAs in Psychology are looking 2.1s- I find this bizzare!:mad::woo:
    Anyone been in the same position as me or give me advice on how i can go forward?
    thanks
    Have you considered the Open University? They do an MSc in Psychological Research Methods, for example.
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    Doing a Msc is entirely possible with a 2.2 however they are difficult to get on to and you will probably have to fund it yourself. Getting relative experience will help as well as good references and anything to add to your C.V.

    One of my friends is currently awaiting to start an Msc with a 2.2 so it is not impossible
 
 
 
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