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Change in viscosity with temperature tin rolling down ramp faster for less viscous? Watch

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    The tin is heated using water bath. The tin will roll faster down the ramp if the syrup has higher temperature, ie is less viscous, won't it?
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    (Original post by ssadi)

    The tin is heated using water bath. The tin will roll faster down the ramp if the syrup has higher temperature, ie is less viscous, won't it?
    Yes I think so, the moleclules in the syrup would collide more quiclky which would make the tin move more faster.
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    But then again, a can full of water wouldn't foll as fast as a can of dog food, as the water would slosh around and create friction against the inside of the can, whereas dog food would just spin with the can and conserve the most energy. If this is the case with each extreme, why would these properties change the other way around when concerning more or less viscous syrup?
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    (Original post by Nuffles)
    But then again, a can full of water wouldn't foll as fast as a can of dog food, as the water would slosh around and create friction against the inside of the can, whereas dog food would just spin with the can and conserve the most energy. If this is the case with each extreme, why would these properties change the other way around when concerning more or less viscous syrup?
    I think you are right in what you have said , but you hav'nt taken the temperature into account.
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    I think too many variables need to be accounted for with changing viscosity.
    Use the proper scientific method by observing an experiment then guessing why what happened happened :P
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    (Original post by rbnphlp)
    I think you are right in what you have said , but you hav'nt taken the temperature into account.
    Why should the temperature be taken into account? The only role it plays is in determining how thick the syrup is. Assume we have an infinitely long slope. If we set off both the thicker syrup can and the thinner syrup can at the same time, then they will roll down the slope. Due to friction between the syrup and the inside of the can, eventually (on an infinite slope) both cans will roll at the same speed as the contents will eventually spin at the same speed as the can. Before each can reaches this point, there will be friction between the can and the syrup. The thicker syrup will have more friction, and will stick to the inside of the can faster, and the can will reach it's terminal velocity faster. It will start off slower, but will accelerate faster and reach that speed before the other can with the thinner syrup.

    Dear God.

    If that makes sense then I congratulate you. I'm probably wrong but that's how I see it.
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    I was under the impression it's only the total mass of the tin which really determines how fast it will go here, not exactly what substance is in it - after all, gravity is the only thing moving the tin...
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    This paper may help.
    http://puhep1.princeton.edu/~mcdonal..._64_277_96.pdf

    An extract
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    (Original post by trm90)
    I was under the impression it's only the total mass of the tin which really determines how fast it will go here, not exactly what substance is in it - after all, gravity is the only thing moving the tin...
    Terminal rolling speed will be the same for the same mass, but different viscosities will accelerate at different rates. I think we're trying to work out which way around :p: That said, I really don't think I actually know what's going on here.
 
 
 
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